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Discussion Starter #1
Today I added a 5" yoyo loach to a new 20 gal tank, after about 1 hour the tank turned all white and cloudy, I was thinking because he stirred up the new flourite. Could it be bacteria?

20gal.
flourite substrate
I used bio bacteria 2 days ago.

I also added a new smaller yoyo loach that looks fine and has strong colors.

Any ideas? Could it be cause he scared? Or sick? It happened in about a 3 hour period.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
no its cycled.
ph is 6.5
kh is 0
ammonia is 0
nitrate is 0
nitrite is 0

the tank had been running a week and a half, 2 days ago i added bacteria.
should be fine. water symptoms show to be good.

I am almost sure the cloudy water is because of the flourite.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
im curious what are some other reasons the loach might be losing its color.

stress?

changing color because of the different lighting and colors in tank?

It was in a planted tank now in a non planted tank.

It is acting normally so I doubt its stress related.

I guess I will keep a close eye on him to see his actions.


I take that back.
its 0.20 ppm ammonia. But i doubt thats uncommon for flourite.
 

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no its cycled.
ph is 6.5
kh is 0
ammonia is 0
nitrate is 0
nitrite is 0

the tank had been running a week and a half, 2 days ago i added bacteria.
should be fine. water symptoms show to be good.

I am almost sure the cloudy water is because of the flourite.
You are not supposed to add fish until your tank has cycled. What 'bacteria' were you talking about?:confused:

Adding fish simply will cause ammonia to rise. Ammonia is quite toxic to the fish. Hardy ones however will tolerate it but most of them fail to survive in the end. I would suggest returning your yoyos to your lfs until your tank has cycled. This is a case of New Tank Syndrome.

Try adding ammonia and seed your tank with your lfs' established filter media. This will jumpstart your tank into cycling phase.
im curious what are some other reasons the loach might be losing its color.

stress?

changing color because of the different lighting and colors in tank?

It was in a planted tank now in a non planted tank.

It is acting normally so I doubt its stress related.

I guess I will keep a close eye on him to see his actions.


I take that back.
its 0.20 ppm ammonia. But i doubt thats uncommon for flourite.
Again, the reason why your yoyo was losing colors is that your tank hasn't cycled at all. Your fluorite has nothing to do with ammonia spikes. It is your fish's poo that has allowed appearance of ammonia.
 

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Discussion Starter #6


is what i used.
My local fish store told me that I could add this to the tank and add fish the next day. I played it safe and waited 2 days. Also, the tank had been running a week and a half.

If its true that the tank hasnt cycled yet, what should the ammonia go up to about?
 

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Children Boogie
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well, check the tank again for ammonia... i think you're fine. Any fish when first put in any tank will get alittle stressed.

And yes, they turn grey/white when stressed.. And also, if there are other kuhlis in there, it's a way of communication for them... The alpha has deeper colors. Just give it plenty of hiding space...

here's more info on it.
Kuhli Loach (Pangio kuhlii) — Loaches Online
 

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well, check the tank again for ammonia... i think you're fine. Any fish when first put in any tank will get alittle stressed.
Were you saying the fish will be fine?:confused: Even with the low pH which makes ammonia less toxic, it is still fatal.

I wouldn't waste money and time on products. Be patient with it. Patience is a virtue in fishkeeping. If you want the best for your fish, definitely let the tank finish cycling before adding any more fish. Your lfs is making convincing statements and you'll be into more troubles soon. I don't like how your lfs managed to get you to buy that stuff and then the fish when the time right now is not ripe for new fish.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
ok, for the time being i put the fish into my 29gal tank.
They should be fine in there.
Tomorrow morning I will check the water levels again. Just to be safe.

I hope they dont die from stress from being moved a couple times tonight.
 

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Children Boogie
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Were you saying the fish will be fine?:confused: Even with the low pH which makes ammonia less toxic, it is still fatal.

I wouldn't waste money and time on products. Be patient with it. Patience is a virtue in fishkeeping. If you want the best for your fish, definitely let the tank finish cycling before adding any more fish. Your lfs is making convincing statements and you'll be into more troubles soon. I don't like how your lfs managed to get you to buy that stuff and then the fish when the time right now is not ripe for new fish.
calm down bluebell. That product he used actually works...But so does a handfull of gravel from an old established tank. :)
You didn't have to spend money on that.

If you have some small fish, put it in the new tank. The bacteria need ammonia to feed off. Wait another week and then put in bigger fish.
 

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Brand new tank, zero nitrate, I would be thinking along the lines that its not cycled yet. Nitrate being the end result of the ammonia being broke down to Nitrites and then Nitrates.
Pull the fish out and let the cycle finish. Check Rex Grigg's site out about cycling
 

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Children Boogie
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not different.. just varied :)

from the link I gave you, they say yoyos don't like new tanks all that much. For now, just put in small fish that don't really care all that much like guppies or something.
 

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I prefer danios and platies for starters. Guppies these days simply don't seem to stand a chance of surviving in the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks, I added a couple tetras from another tank.

Water levels havnt changed at all and now its been about 4 days since i added the bacteria.
Water is clear
ph 6.7
ammonia 0.20ppm
nitrate 0
nitrite 0
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ok, so turns out I was right, the water was cycled cause the bacteria I added cycled it much faster. 9 days have passed, the tank contains 1 5" yoyo loach, a 2" yoyo, 6 tetras and a hillstream loach.
This whole time the water has shown the same reading of ammonia, 0.20-0.25ppm, it was not caused by the tank not having been cycled, so I was led to believe it was the rocks I added that might be leeching ammonia. I removed the rocks, did a water change and placed the rocks in a bucket of water for 9 days, tested for ammonia and got 0ppm.

Today I also tested the tank water and it gave me the same reading 0.20ppm
The tank only has 2 stems of sunset hygro. The plant has not been growing very fast under the lower light conditions but growing and pearling a couple hours after i dose with excel. Which I have stopped doing the last 9 days.
It is now growing hair algae. So I think there are excess nutrients in the tank, mainly because there are only two stems in the tank. More plants should help.

Back to the ammonia, where is it coming from? Every one says its not the Flourite but I am starting to question that again. I remember somebody saying it caused traces of ammonia a while back.

Any ideas?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
bump, what would cause ammonia?
What is known to cause ammonia?
 

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bump, what would cause ammonia?
What is known to cause ammonia?
Unconsumed food, decaying fish corpses, and decaying plant matter generate ammonia in the water. Though some fish are still tolerant to low levels of ammonia, ammonia is still toxic to the fish hence there is a need to ensure ammonia is nil in the end before you add the fish. This is where the first of two, very beneficial, bacteria come into play. As the ammonia becomes present in the tank, this bacterium, called Nitrosomonas, begins to develop and create colonies within the filter media, substrate, and any other porous materials within the water. The Nitrosomonas bacterium feeds on the ammonia, converting it to yet another highly poisonous toxin called nitrite (No2).

For more information, read this link.:smile: I had posted only what will answer your questions.:smile:

HTH
 
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