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Native South American plants, native Apistogrammas, lil' male Betta and some Paleomonetes Argentinus
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All right, so first off let me apologize. Honestly, my knowledge of aquarium plants is Neanderthal. I know consummate hobbyists hate dumb questions. Just know I realize this.

I've got "a native plant" (really do not know what it is, I'm from Argentina and I collected it from a ditch along with my Apistogramma) that seems to have some issues with light. My lights (two dimmed COBs 50 watts each) were originally placed pretty far above the tank, but my Salvinia Auriculata wasn0t growing well, so I brought them closer. Now these native stem plants have begun yellowing somewhat.

Exhibits A through D: lil' fish, top view, side view, full tank view.

Water Vertebrate Fin Botany Organism


Plant Leaf Groundcover Petal Terrestrial plant


Plant Leaf Terrestrial plant Aquatic plant Marine biology


Plant Vertebrate Rectangle Wood Wall


The substrate is sandcapped topsoil. It's growing all my natives like crazy with zero issues... until now.

The population is one male juvenile betta, one male juvenile (I think) apistogramma commbrae, and some invertebrates. There's Macrobrachium Borellii, Paleomonetes Argentinus, and native trumpet snails.
 

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I think this is Lysimachia nummularia. Amazing plant - grows in my dry and sunny backyard as well as in my aquariums. There is also an 'Aurea' variant which happens to have yellowish leaves.

As for Neanderthals :ROFLMAO: what frequently happens is that after a while of happy growth from the initial setup and substrate charge, your plants deplete the required nutrients and start to slow down/yellow/die. This depends a bit on how rich your substrate is (inert sand vs top soil for example). Typically Nitrates run out and since plants need these to grow you start to see deficiencies.

It could also be that the lights are too weak, although if plants have been growing well and just started to yellow I would thing this less likely.

There are also a number of other, even less likelier reasons. Aquariums are complex systems, so who knows.
 

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Native South American plants, native Apistogrammas, lil' male Betta and some Paleomonetes Argentinus
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think this is Lysimachia nummularia. Amazing plant - grows in my dry and sunny backyard as well as in my aquariums. There is also an 'Aurea' variant which happens to have yellowish leaves.

As for Neanderthals :ROFLMAO: what frequently happens is that after a while of happy growth from the initial setup and substrate charge, your plants deplete the required nutrients and start to slow down/yellow/die. This depends a bit on how rich your substrate is (inert sand vs top soil for example). Typically Nitrates run out and since plants need these to grow you start to see deficiencies.

It could also be that the lights are too weak, although if plants have been growing well and just started to yellow I would thing this less likely.

There are also a number of other, even less likelier reasons. Aquariums are complex systems, so who knows.
Thanks for the answer!

I'll go with the "who knows", I think. It shouldn't be depleted, though. It's topsoil and the bioload is pretty heavy. Also, it's a month old, or two. If anything, nutrients should be high.

It's not light, although it might be too much light.

As for the species, no, I don't think so. I'll see if I can snap a pic next time I'm near the ditch. It's winter now, so we won't have any flowers, that would simplify things. Lysimachia nummularia does not occur in South America, or so Google says. Also, it's not really like the photos I looked up.
 

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All right, so first off let me apologize. Honestly, my knowledge of aquarium plants is Neanderthal. I know consummate hobbyists hate dumb questions. Just know I realize this.

I've got "a native plant" (really do not know what it is, I'm from Argentina and I collected it from a ditch along with my Apistogramma) that seems to have some issues with light. My lights (two dimmed COBs 50 watts each) were originally placed pretty far above the tank, but my Salvinia Auriculata wasn0t growing well, so I brought them closer. Now these native stem plants have begun yellowing somewhat.

Exhibits A through D: lil' fish, top view, side view, full tank view.
View attachment 1045675

The substrate is sandcapped topsoil. It's growing all my natives like crazy with zero issues... until now.

The population is one male juvenile betta, one male juvenile (I think) apistogramma commbrae, and some invertebrates. There's Macrobrachium Borellii, Paleomonetes Argentinus, and native trumpet snails.
Hi @Jorge OPL

It appears to be nutrient related, specifically lack of sufficient nitrogen. Two reasons I say that; first the older leaves in the picture are showing much more chlorosis (yellowing) than the new leaves, this indicates the issue involves one of the 'mobile nutrients', and secondly the new leaves are showing uniform chlorosis (yellowing) not interveinal chlorosis. All soils are not the same, the amount of nutrients they contain can vary greatly. Also, soil does not retain nitrogen easily.....that is why farmers have to use fertilizer to begin with. I would suggest a good all-purpose fertilizer to supplement what nutrients may or may not be left in your soil. If you live in the U.S. I recommend nilocg.com Thrive. If you live in Europe or elsewhere I suggest Tropica Specialised Nutrition which contains both macro nutrients and micro nutrients. Hope this helps!

Seriously doubt it is the light, if the plants grew well before it is most likely nutrient related. Hope this helps! -Roy
 

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Native South American plants, native Apistogrammas, lil' male Betta and some Paleomonetes Argentinus
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi @Jorge OPL

It appears to be nutrient related, specifically lack of sufficient nitrogen. Two reasons I say that; first the older leaves in the picture are showing much more chlorosis (yellowing) than the new leaves, this indicates the issue involves one of the 'mobile nutrients', and secondly the new leaves are showing uniform chlorosis (yellowing) not interveinal chlorosis.

Seriously doubt it is the light, if the plants grew well before it is most likely nutrient related. Hope this helps! -Roy
Well. I am astounded at the wealth of information you got from a lousy phone picture. Can't thank you enough.

I live in Argentina - good ole third-world country, but I'll pick up some NPK fertilizer from my local store. I was looking at it with greedy eyes already.
 

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Well. I am astounded at the wealth of information you got from a lousy phone picture. Can't thank you enough.

I live in Argentina - good ole third-world country, but I'll pick up some NPK fertilizer from my local store. I was looking at it with greedy eyes already.
@Jorge OPL

lol, I downloaded and enlarged the photo to get better detail....my old eyes probably couldn't have done it otherwise. Let us know how it goes! -Roy
 

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Well. I am astounded at the wealth of information you got from a lousy phone picture. Can't thank you enough.

I live in Argentina - good ole third-world country, but I'll pick up some NPK fertilizer from my local store. I was looking at it with greedy eyes already.
If you do have topsoil as your substrate and the tank isn't that old yet it may be something else. In any case, before you buy nutrients, perhaps a NO3 test kit would clarify if it is that sort of deficiency.
 

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Native South American plants, native Apistogrammas, lil' male Betta and some Paleomonetes Argentinus
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you do have topsoil as your substrate and the tank isn't that old yet it may be something else. In any case, before you buy nutrients, perhaps a NO3 test kit would clarify if it is that sort of deficiency.
I'd love to, honestly, but the test array just isn't an option. A single test kit is more expensive than the aquarium itself down here, it makes no sense whatsoever. The only thing I'm really worrying about is the fish. I got the plants for 1.5 US dollars the 30-stem bunch. Worst case scenario, I'll buy more and continue trying to find an equilibrium.
 

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Not sure what kind of topsoil you have, but generally new topsoil would have plenty of N. Could be your taking native plants and they can't adjust to the "reduced light" in an aquarium compared to outdoors. Even if you tested the water and it came up low on N, it doesn't mean the topsoil doesn't house a sufficient amount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Not sure what kind of topsoil you have, but generally new topsoil would have plenty of N. Could be your taking native plants and they can't adjust to the "reduced light" in an aquarium compared to outdoors. Even if you tested the water and it came up low on N, it doesn't mean the topsoil doesn't house a sufficient amount.
I've been researching, and I've got INSANE lighting. Looked good to me, but apparently it's too much. Two 50 watt led COBS for a barely 35 liter tank...

Pity though. Liked the look on it.
 

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I've been researching, and I've got INSANE lighting. Looked good to me, but apparently it's too much. Two 50 watt led COBS for a barely 35 liter tank...

Pity though. Liked the look on it.
It doesn't usually work that way. There is really no such thing as too much light for plants, unless algae is growing. If your lighting was insanely high, your tank would be an algae farm. Plants don't generally yellow from too much light, especially ones that are used to outdoor sun.
 
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