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just out of curiosity, why are they illegal? :bounce:
its an invasive species. It grows under just about any light and can easily clog creeks and streams. Check with your local laws to see if it is prohibited in your area, if not as long as you get it locally there should not be any problems. When you trim and have to dispose of any part of the plant make sure it is utter mush before you toss it.
 

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its an invasive species. It grows under just about any light and can easily clog creeks and streams. Check with your local laws to see if it is prohibited in your area, if not as long as you get it locally there should not be any problems. When you trim and have to dispose of any part of the plant make sure it is utter mush before you toss it.
Since he did post on a local thread he can only get it from someone in NY. Its allowed within the state. Just can't bring it across the borders.
 

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Since he did post on a local thread he can only get it from someone in NY. Its allowed within the state. Just can't bring it across the borders.
Most of the time when someone cannot find something locally, they begin searching nationally. Just wanted to get the warning in there before he did.

I know places like Texas, it is not legal to own it by state law, as well as federal law. Was not sure about NY
 

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Here is a quote

"Hygrophila polysperma is a fast-growing and fast-spreading invasive that can outshade and therefore outcompete other submersed plants; it can occupy the entire water column; many adventitious roots at stem nodes means that fragments can easily grow.
Hygrophila polysperma clogs irrigation and flood-control canals; in south Florida, large mats of fragments collect at culverts and interfere with essential water control pumping stations; it interferes with navigation; and it's even able to compete with another aggressive non-native invasive plant, hydrilla, and is replacing hydrilla in some Florida locations.

Hygrophila reportedly grew on Lake Tohopekaliga (Florida) from 0.1 acre in 1979 to 10 acres in 1980 (MITRE). "

The last part about .1 acre to 10 acres in one year shows why they are trying to contain it.

Good read with some photos
http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/191
 
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