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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I have the bug and am already setting up multiple tanks while I wait for my first to cycle:icon_lol:! My husband is not only supportive, but found another spot in our house and bought me the tank I have had my eye on! He's amazing!

So my question(s). I have a Fluval 305 that I purchased used set up on my new 27 gallon cube tank. I have just finished (lol like it will ever be finished) planting and notice some sway in the plants.

My intended stock is small fish - pygmy corys, ember tetras, and similar sized species. I am afraid they will get pushed around the tank. The plants are not grown enough to buffer the flow at all. My add-on concern is the intake will be too strong for them (the person I purchased the filter from put a plastic basket zip tied around the end of the intake, but he kept very large fish).

Is the outflow a valid concern with these fish? How can I modify the flow to better suit them?

Any suggestions for modifying the intake? I have a fluval sponge pre-filter on my other tank, but from previous experiments, the suction power of the 305 starts to pull the sponge in / reduces the flow (is this hard on the filter?).

I read that you can use the lever on the filter to adjust flow but that it put stress on the filter. I am trying to find a balance of happy fish, happy plants, and no damage to the equipment.

My apologies for so many questions. It should be a matter of a couple days before my cycle is complete and I want to ensure my tank is ready for the fish I am so looking forward to!

Thank you for your help.
 

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It seems the recommended circulation for a freshwater tank is 4x the volume of your tank although for planted tanks, circulation can be halved (http://www.aquariumguys.com/aquarium-circulation-article.html). Your filter circulates at 185 gph, which is almost 7x the volume of your tank, so it appears you may have too much circulation in your tank.

With that being said, I have an HOB filter on my 20 gallon that's rated for a 50 gallon tank. It circulates up to 200 gph. I have guppies (including fry), neons, corys, ottos, a dwarf gourami and a molly, and none of them seem to be bothered by the current at all. I'm guessing your fish will be fine too.

Your fish will find the calmer areas of your tank. If they all congregate in a particular area rather than exploring all areas of your tank, I'm sure there are ways you can blunt the flow.
 

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You might be pleasantly surprised to find your fish playing in the current :proud: They will find the calmer areas of the tank when they want a rest. I have an eheim 2026 on my 29 gallon, which is rated for around 250 gals/hr AND an AC70 both running at full throttle and the fish are doing great.
 

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I would use the lever to throttle it back if you find it has to much flow, it won't hurt anything, may draw a little more power but I wouldn't worry about it.

Good luck with the new tank.
 

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I have 200+ gph on my 12 gallon and 1500+ gph on my 190. Neither are too high by any stretch. Of course both have 2 returns so the flow is halved out of each.

As tankedagain said, it's easier to throttle than to increase flow.
 

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I would use a 'Y' insert fitting and use 2 glass inlet pipes.

You really just need to keep the water moving rather than rely on the pump to push it from one source. Fewer areas of poor circulation.

I've been experimenting with my cats water fountain pump for the ideal circulation for my small tank.
 

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I would use a 'Y' insert fitting and use 2 glass inlet pipes.

You really just need to keep the water moving rather than rely on the pump to push it from one source. Fewer areas of poor circulation.

I've been experimenting with my cats water fountain pump for the ideal circulation for my small tank.
If you're going that route split the outlet rather than the inlet.
 

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You should be fine. When the plants grow in you might want to get a power head for more movement.

I have ten times circulation in all my tanks but they are heavily planted.

Example fx5 on a 75 with reactor and inline heater with lots of plumbing that slows down flow but I still have lots of current also have a koralia 550 gph power head.

My fish just have a hoot in the current.

Inhabitants are baby (3 month old) praecox rainbows (10), brilliant red tailed rasboras (10), harlequin rasboras (10), 1 Killi a bunch of different cory cats and three plecos 1 super red, 1 long finned lemon drop, and my most expensive fish a blue phantom.
 

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I just don't understand this trend to buy more filter than a tank will ever need. I have been in this hobby for years and never once felt the need to do this. I am sure the companies that make filters are very happy though.

Yes I have had filters break down. In this case I took the bio media out put it in the main tank, went to the store and bought another filter put my old bio media in the new filter and went on with my day .

Nothing died ! Fish tanks are a lot like life , if you take care of things a lot of the horrible things you think can happen never do.

Planted tanks in particular do not need all this filtration.
 

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I just don't understand this trend to buy more filter than a tank will ever need. I have been in this hobby for years and never once felt the need to do this. I am sure the companies that make filters are very happy though.

Yes I have had filters break down. In this case I took the bio media out put it in the main tank, went to the store and bought another filter put my old bio media in the new filter and went on with my day .

Nothing died ! Fish tanks are a lot like life , if you take care of things a lot of the horrible things you think can happen never do.

Planted tanks in particular do not need all this filtration.

No two tanks are the same. Some tanks are longer. Some are taller. Some have few fish. Some have tons of fish.

A good flow never hurts. A lacking flow can hurt.
 

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I just don't understand this trend to buy more filter than a tank will ever need. I have been in this hobby for years and never once felt the need to do this. I am sure the companies that make filters are very happy though.

Yes I have had filters break down. In this case I took the bio media out put it in the main tank, went to the store and bought another filter put my old bio media in the new filter and went on with my day .

Nothing died ! Fish tanks are a lot like life , if you take care of things a lot of the horrible things you think can happen never do.

Planted tanks in particular do not need all this filtration.
You can get away with a "small" filter sure. You can't argue a small filter is just as good as a large filter though. Good enough maybe, but definitely not as good.
 

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You can get away with a "small" filter sure. You can't argue a small filter is just as good as a large filter though. Good enough maybe, but definitely not as good.
I am not talking about a "small" filter...I am talking about one that is designed for the size tank you have. For example I have a 75 gallon full blown planted tank....I have an Ehiem Classic 2215 its designed to filter up to 93 gallons of water. All my plants and fish are thriving....I don't need a bigger filter its just not necessary.Why would I spend my hobby dollars on a bigger filter when I could spend it elsewhere ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you everyone for your input! I should be getting fish this weekend or early next week so I'll see how they do and the modify per the above as needed. Reading everyone's experience is really helpful. I floated a couple plant leaves that I clipped and watched and there are definitely some slower areas. I hope my little guys and gals happily play in the current too! I have not seen the Y split but will look it up so I can be ready if modifications are needed beyond toggling the lever.

Regarding the filter size, I purchased it along with a 40 gallon hexagon tank when I got back into the hobby. The guy I purchased from had a really nice set up and clean water and I had no idea what I was doing it so I just went with what he said and have gotten off to a good start. When my husband and I got it home the tank ended up looking awful with our decor so I sold it but kept the filter and heaters. All in all I paid about $20 for the Fluval 305 in good condition, so I am happy with it and even happier if I don't have to replace it, even though it might be too much filter for my tank!

I am doing my very best to make the plants happy and create a healthy environment for my fish, but as far as the equipment is concerned I've just kind of stumbled my way into the whole hobby (it all started with a 10gallon tank for our youngest!).

Again, thank you for the input!
 

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I am not talking about a "small" filter...I am talking about one that is designed for the size tank you have. For example I have a 75 gallon full blown planted tank....I have an Ehiem Classic 2215 its designed to filter up to 93 gallons of water. All my plants and fish are thriving....I don't need a bigger filter its just not necessary.Why would I spend my hobby dollars on a bigger filter when I could spend it elsewhere ?
Up to 93 gallons is the key phrase. Eheim doesn't disclose the same information on the american models as they do the european models, but if you look up the classic 350, which is the euro version of the 2215, you'll see the following.

The 350 is rated "for aquariums of about" 120 liters (31 gals) and "for aquariums up to approx." 350 liters (92 gals).

The media capacity is 4L (~1 gallon) and the pump output is 620 liters (164 gals).

Link here: https://www.eheim.com/en_GB/products/technology/external-filters/classic-350

Interestingly the ratings for the pro filters are much more conservative. The 2073, which is rated for up to 90 gals, has a flow output of 275 gals. That's nearly double that of the 2215. Media capacity is only slightly larger than the 2215 at 1.3 gals. Yet those filters are rated for the same size tank by the manufacturer. This is why one can't just look at the box and pick a filter. You need to decide how much turn over is enough. 5x is generally a good aim, but sometimes you may want more.

Now it gets a little more complicated if you want to really drill deeper. The pump output numbers don't account for any fluid losses as a result of the media, especially dirty media. Those numbers are strictly how much water the pump puts out. So that 5x is maybe more like 4x or 3.5x the aquarium capacity after you add media. Not a huge deal if you start with a filter that has 5x the capacity of your tank as you would if you're running the 2215 on a 31 gallon aquarium. However, in your case you're running that filter on a 75 gallon so you're starting at only 2x before you even add media, less if you're running that filter on a 92 gallon tank. After media you're at maybe 1.5x or even less.

It's certainly doable as you've demonstrated, but I wouldn't call it ideal by any means. A lot also depends on the tank as was already pointed out. It's one thing if you're keeping tetras and cory cats and a very different story if you're trying to keep 4 discus. The plants help too of course. But once you get to such a low turnover rate by the filter you are pretty much forced to do large water changes every week. You can't let the filter go 3 months without cleaning it. If you are diligent about your maintenance you can certainly pull it off, but I'm not. Some weeks I just don't have the time and for me the few extra bucks for the convenience of being able to miss a week here and there is well worth it. I think this is true for most people and that is why I recommend a slightly larger filter whenever possible. Overall the larger filter expands your options quite a bit. You can plant the tank more heavily before you run into dead spots, you can stock the tank more heavily, etc.
 

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Up to 93 gallons is the key phrase. Eheim doesn't disclose the same information on the american models as they do the european models, but if you look up the classic 350, which is the euro version of the 2215, you'll see the following.

The 350 is rated "for aquariums of about" 120 liters (31 gals) and "for aquariums up to approx." 350 liters (92 gals).

The media capacity is 4L (~1 gallon) and the pump output is 620 liters (164 gals).

Link here: https://www.eheim.com/en_GB/products/technology/external-filters/classic-350

Interestingly the ratings for the pro filters are much more conservative. The 2073, which is rated for up to 90 gals, has a flow output of 275 gals. That's nearly double that of the 2215. Media capacity is only slightly larger than the 2215 at 1.3 gals. Yet those filters are rated for the same size tank by the manufacturer. This is why one can't just look at the box and pick a filter. You need to decide how much turn over is enough. 5x is generally a good aim, but sometimes you may want more.

Now it gets a little more complicated if you want to really drill deeper. The pump output numbers don't account for any fluid losses as a result of the media, especially dirty media. Those numbers are strictly how much water the pump puts out. So that 5x is maybe more like 4x or 3.5x the aquarium capacity after you add media. Not a huge deal if you start with a filter that has 5x the capacity of your tank as you would if you're running the 2215 on a 31 gallon aquarium. However, in your case you're running that filter on a 75 gallon so you're starting at only 2x before you even add media, less if you're running that filter on a 92 gallon tank. After media you're at maybe 1.5x or even less.

It's certainly doable as you've demonstrated, but I wouldn't call it ideal by any means. A lot also depends on the tank as was already pointed out. It's one thing if you're keeping tetras and cory cats and a very different story if you're trying to keep 4 discus. The plants help too of course. But once you get to such a low turnover rate by the filter you are pretty much forced to do large water changes every week. You can't let the filter go 3 months without cleaning it. If you are diligent about your maintenance you can certainly pull it off, but I'm not. Some weeks I just don't have the time and for me the few extra bucks for the convenience of being able to miss a week here and there is well worth it. I think this is true for most people and that is why I recommend a slightly larger filter whenever possible. Overall the larger filter expands your options quite a bit. You can plant the tank more heavily before you run into dead spots, you can stock the tank more heavily, etc.
Wow ! You know I have never had anyone actually make a good case as to why they do this but you certainly have. Do you think it would make my tank more stable if I added another 2215 ? I am already doing big weekly water changes if this would cut that back to 10 days it would be awesome.
 

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Wow ! You know I have never had anyone actually make a good case as to why they do this but you certainly have. Do you think it would make my tank more stable if I added another 2215 ? I am already doing big weekly water changes if this would cut that back to 10 days it would be awesome.
Definitely. I'm not sure if it would cut back your water changes unless there is some metric you currently go by (nitrate spikes, floating debris, etc.), which more filtration would reduce. It would halve your filter maintenance at the very least.
 
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