The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will rooted plants grow in PFS? I plan on dividing my tanks substrate but, even with doing this, some plants may have to go in the PFS. I have a 75g tank and will be dosing ferts, have CO2, 215w T5 HO lights and can also add fert sticks to the substrate, if needed. I was primerally looking at putting Dwarf Sag or some "carpet" type plant into the PFS. What do you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
Rooted plants will grow in pool filter sand. Plants pick up nutrients from the water as well as through the roots. If you add substrate fertilizer tabs under the fastest growing plants, they will probably grow better, but they will grow in any case if the water is fertilized.

You do have more light than you need for that tank. If you had half that light you would still have high light, and would still need to keep the CO2 concentration high and consistent throughout the tank. If you want to use that 4 bulb fixture, raise it about 10 inches above the tank to reduce the intensity and give more uniform intensity throughout the tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
Many people are using only PFS and plants apparently grow in it just fine. Last time I had a planted tank I used Eco Complete but I didn't feel like spending that kind of money on gravel this time. Now my tank is all PFS and some black aquarium gravel. This tank is twice as successful at growing all species of plants not because its PFS sand vs Eco-complete but because I know what I'm doing this time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. Hey Hoppy, do you think I should only use 2 bulbs, for now? Or would raising the fixture be the best option?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
Thanks guys. Hey Hoppy, do you think I should only use 2 bulbs, for now? Or would raising the fixture be the best option?
I think raising a light so it hangs above an open top tank is the best way to light any aquarium. That makes it easy to reach in the tank when you walk by, and pick up dead leaves, fluff the plants, pinch off some too fast growing plants, etc. It just keeps you totally involved with the tank, always a good idea. It also makes the light intensity in the tank much more uniform, so you don't have super high light near the water surface and low light at the substrate, nor do you have lower light at the ends and front/back of the tank. Since you have the fixture, if you don't mind using that much electricity, I would definitely hang it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
332 Posts
I think raising a light so it hangs above an open top tank is the best way to light any aquarium. That makes it easy to reach in the tank when you walk by, and pick up dead leaves, fluff the plants, pinch off some too fast growing plants, etc. It just keeps you totally involved with the tank, always a good idea. It also makes the light intensity in the tank much more uniform, so you don't have super high light near the water surface and low light at the substrate, nor do you have lower light at the ends and front/back of the tank. Since you have the fixture, if you don't mind using that much electricity, I would definitely hang it.
On the other hand with such easy access, if you tend to be the sort who cant resist straightening things up and fixing things in your tank, you will spend your time at home with one wet sleeve depending of course on the depth of your tank.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top