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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
There are three amano shrimps in my tank, only this one has an orangish tint to him. Is this normal for amanos?

I think I may have gotten ghost shrimp. What are distinguishing differences between amano and ghost shrimp, to be sure?

 

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Amano shrimp can change colors depending on their environment and water conditions. There's a member on HFB who has Amano shrimp and they breed profusely in his many ponds. His Amanos are a variety of colors: blue, green, yellow, and orange. Once you move them to a normal aquarium setting, they start to change back to what most of us are used to (transparent with markings). I've always thought they were supposed to be transparent, but was shocked upon finding that they can change colors.
 

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do a quick google search it looks like a cardina propinqua or orange bee shrimp. also whoever told you they were breeding amano shrimp in their pond is either a lair or confused. ammano shrimp need brackish water when they're young. so whoever told you this is probably breeding cherry shrimp which are the varieties that come in a bunch of colors such as red orange and blue and usually loose their coloration in undesired water conditions. anyways this is definitely not an amano shrimp.
 

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Apparently they aren't lying or confused. I had gotten some in the past from him and they are truly amano shrimp. After they settled, I couldn't tell the difference between his pond amanos and my amanos I bought from the store. It was probably something in his ponds that affected them in this way. The guy had gotten some and just tossed them in one of his ponds and after that they were reproducing like crazy. He scoops them out and adds them to each pond he makes. Definitely not cherry shrimp as I have quite a number of them and they do not bear any resemblance. Also, amanos get much larger than cherry shrimp.

I never denied what you're claiming it to be. I'm just simply tossing out a little info from personal experience.
 

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I don't think they are amano. Amanos don't breed in freshwater ponds, brackish is the way to go with breeding Amanos. The young develop from a larval stage.
 

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I know... Amano shrimp develop from a larval stage that requires salinity of brackish water. I don't know how the guy is doing it, but his Amanos are breeding and thriving in his ponds. Maybe they're brackish ponds? I don't know how his ponds are setup.
 

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I know... Amano shrimp develop from a larval stage that requires salinity of brackish water. I don't know how the guy is doing it, but his Amanos are breeding and thriving in his ponds. Maybe they're brackish ponds? I don't know how his ponds are setup.
Take a picture of your Amanos from his pond.

They need full strength saltwater to develop properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Hmmm, sounds like I don't have an amano (was thinking maybe he was sick)

Is it possible that I was sold ghost shrimp instead? These guys haven't really gone after the diatom algae in the tank like I thought they would.
 

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Amano shrimp regardless the color or manner of "cultivation" don't look like ghost shrimp. The latter tend to be transparent, maybe with faint lines, have steeply arched backs, long limbs and feelers.

Amano shrimp look more like large cherries.

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It's definitely not a Palaemonetes ghost shrimp -- the body form is clearly atyid. I'd say it's some non-Amano species of Caridina. The rostrum and cephalothorax don't seem to indicate C. thambipillai -- this is the actual name of orange/"sunkist" C. cf. propinqua -- to me. The resemblance in coloration is probably just superficial -- it seems like its dietary or otherwise environmentally induced even in C. thambipillai (captive-bred F2s are more transparent).

The muscle tissue looked a little hazy in your first pic. If it gets to be opaque, the shrimp is almost surely on the way out.
 

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I don't know the name of this shrimp but where I live they are called opae. Not to be mistaken with opae ula. But I do believe they might be the same Organism Fish Pet supply Aquarium decor Underwater
they started out clear with very slight marking then they started turning orange/redish Green Freshwater aquarium Aquarium decor
 

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I don't know the name of this shrimp but where I live they are called opae. Not to be mistaken with opae ula. But I do believe they might be the same
Opae, as you probably know, is just the general Hawaiian word for shrimp. The animals in your pictures would be the Neocaridina denticulata (might now be N. heteropoda, depending on who you consult) that were introduced to Hawaii from East Asia. Same species as cherry shrimp.

I'm not that great with Asian atyids, but I don't think these are what OP has (body form reminds me more of a Caridina from the "bee shrimp" group).

At any rate, it's not uncommon for these non-target "contaminant" species to show up in shipments of Amanos, since they're all wild-collected.
 
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