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The first one definitely. I honestly don't know much about the second one, but I can personally vouch for the GLA ones, and GLA gets nothing but great reviews from its customers (myself included), and I can't say I ever see people raving about the second company in general, much less a specific product of theirs.

Go with GLA, you won't be disappointed. If you have any questions, you should PM the owner, who is a member and sponsor here. His screenname is Orlando.
 

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I think this is an apple vs orange comparison. The GLA regulator assembly is based on a very high quality, industrial grade regulator, which is about as good as you could get for aquarium use. But, the other is an electronically controlled output regulator, which is a different thing entirely, but it seems to be based on a lower quality regulator. The reviews on the forums by people using these have all been very positive. I think if you want a really good quality, reliable regulator you get the GLA unit, but if you enjoy using something really different, possibly better, you get the other one.

Personally, I wouldn't buy a system like either one. I would much prefer to just buy the regulator assembly, and pick my own reactor/diffuser, and perhaps DIY the bubble counter. I haven't yet seen a good reason to buy a ready-made reactor/diffuser.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't buy a system like either one. I would much prefer to just buy the regulator assembly, and pick my own reactor/diffuser, and perhaps DIY the bubble counter. I haven't yet seen a good reason to buy a ready-made reactor/diffuser.
+1. If you pick out your own regulator, needle valve, solenoid, etc and assemble everything yourself, it will end up being a little cheaper. Significant savings can be had, especially if you are patient and wait for the best deal to show up on eBay.
 

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I believe that setup is based on the Azoo regulator. Some people have good experiences with it, others not so much so.

There is a lot more variety and choice if you want to look outside of pre-built regulator/pressurized CO2 setups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
hmm ya i know first time with a co2 setup but only thing that does really well in my tanks are mosses. Dark can you give me a hand, if you don't mind need to put something together.

thanks
JC
 

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Here are the things you will need:

CO2 Tank: I believe this is obvious. Get the biggest tank that you can afford/can live with. Larger tanks are not that much more expensive than smaller tanks, and refill costs are not substantially different. Rather than having to deal with the hassle of multiple refills per year, getting a large tank that will last you much longer can reduce maintenance quite a bit.
Regulator: This will reduce the tank pressure from ~800 PSI to a workable delivery pressure (most people set it between 20-30 PSI).
Needle Valve: This will further reduce the working pressure to an even lower rate (i.e. bubbles per seconds).

Some more "optional" equipment (in quotations, because in reality, they are needed, but are more for "safety")
Check Valve: You don't want a back siphon to start and have water destroy your regulator build

Optional, but highly recommended equipment:
Solenoid: Allows you to put your CO2 on a timer, so that it will turn on and off automatically.
Drop checker: When used in conjunction with a 4 dkH reference solution (can either be bought or made; I assume you work in a lab, so you likely have access to lab equipment to make your own), it will allow for "at a glance" levels of CO2 in your aquarium

Optional equipment, if you have cash to spare:
pH controller: Allows the constant monitoring of pH and can control the injection of CO2 (when used with a solenoid).
 

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ph controller = pointless.

If your planning on getting one, PLZ PLZ PLZ do your research here first. I got one too, and decided it was useless before I even bothered taking it out of the box. Spend your money elsewhere.

James 2¢
 

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I'm with Zavikan on pH controllers. They aren't cheap, and if you add their cost to what you planned to spend on a regulator/needle valve you can get parts that will make your CO2 system work easily and reliably for years. And, you lose very little by doing so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wells I like to get everything in one place. The only place i found with good stuff together is GLA can anyone help me put something together there? And what I would need to get CO2 system running completely automatic.

Thanks for your help guys.
 

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Wells I like to get everything in one place. The only place i found with good stuff together is GLA can anyone help me put something together there? And what I would need to get CO2 system running completely automatic.

Thanks for your help guys.
Here are some other sites that also sell complete setups (minus the CO2 tank, I believe)

http://sumoregulator.com/
http://www.bestaquariumregulator.com/index.htm
http://oregonaquadesign.vstore.ca/index.php/cName/co2/osCsid/6df24975704b151b07d9989be16fe136

Jame you dont you the PH controller you just use a timer ?
Along with many other people, I don't use a pH controller either. A solenoid attached to a timer is more than sufficient for my needs.

ADA products are like the Cadillacs of the hobby; while they are extremely nice pieces of equipment, (in my humble opinion), they are overpriced and really unnecessary.
 

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I just received a SuMo Regulator. Quality is excellent. Came well packaged, with good setup instructions. It includes the Ideal needle valve whcih is the best and I can vouch for its precision. It was one of the least expensive with the Ideal valve. It setup fast and easily. No problems and has been rock solid.

The SuMo guys are very responsive and helpful. The assemble was thoroughly tested before tehy shipped.

AB
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
thank you Anthony and AB.

Anthony what the setting you put on a timer. Did you get any timer for the job?
 

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I have my timer set so that the CO2 turns on 30 minutes before the lights turn on, and turns off 30 minutes before the lights turn off.

I am using a cheap, no-name brand timer I found on sale at Home Depot many years ago. Any timer will work.
 

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btw, before you purchase a tank:

1) measure your cabinet to ensure you buy one that fits. Add 3 inches or so to the top of the tanks to accomodate the regulator.
2) Find your nearest CO2 supplier and see how they work. Mine only fills on Fridays, but you can pick up pre-filled anytime. So it was much more flexible to just enroll in their refill program. No point buying a nice, pretty new tank just to "give" it to them as part of the exchange program.

AB
 
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