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Which car would you buy for an investment?

  • Shelby GT 500 fastback

    Votes: 12 57.1%
  • Shelby GT 500 convertible

    Votes: 4 19.0%
  • Chevy 789

    Votes: 5 23.8%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Whichever car the wife says :angel: :icon_lol:
 

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Clean Fastbacks are becoming hard to find let alone GT 500. I'd go that route.

Customs can be built any time no real big deal there. But it is a cool looking ride for a warm climate. :)

Edit:
Sorry I though you were talking the real deal. The new mustangs are not my cup o tea. Ford as a whole turn me off... But when your talking classics it's a different ball game.
 

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Dude, a car is NOT an investment. Not even if you own an older model Rolls Royce or some such.
It will always decrease in value (wear and tear, plus mileage) and you'll almost never get your invested $$ back out of it.
Want an investment? How about some land, rare coin collection(?) or buy some mutual funds. A house, actually, is the best investment you can have.
On a side note, I love Mustangs, so I would probably go with the Shelby fastback, as I'm not that into convertables. Both of those Shelby's would be nice --- GT500 has the 427 cobra jet, I believe.
My dream (muscle) car is a 1969 or 1970 Mustang Mach1 w/ 351 Cleveland(big block). I drove a '69 w/ a 351 Windsor(small block) once and it was very nice. Great power and looked sharp. Burgandy w/ black stripe down the center. My father has a 1966 Mustang fastback that he just restored and already he has won several best of shows. That car is immaculate.
 

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Dude, a car is NOT an investment. Not even if you own an older model Rolls Royce or some such.
It will always decrease in value (wear and tear, plus mileage) and you'll almost never get your invested $$ back out of it.
I beg to differ. My dad supported my family for about 6 yrs(paid his way through college as well as our bills) on investing in cars. He'd buy older cars that had something wrong(or a lot of things wrong) and he'd fix and resell them. He did all the work himself, so his out of pocket cost was minimal, maximizing his profit. There was one car I remember very well that he bought for a couple hundred with a blown motor and a horrible paint job. He fixed it up real nice, airbrushed a spider on the hood, and resold it for over $5,000. It was a 77 or 78 Chevy Monza Spider. I would definitely call that and all the others he fixed up an investment.

I vote GT500 fastback only because I don't think they look right as a convertible. I'd have to agree with whoever said the old ones were better. They just don't make cars like they used to IMO.
 

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Cars are bad investments......fixing cheap broken cars is not so much as an investment but more of a job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Many of the original Shelby Mustangs and Cobras are selling for $500,000 to over $1 mil at the various actions. The original list price was $5000 to over $7000, I believe.

I don't think that the new GT 500 will lose money. It's price should increase down the road.

The Chevy 789 is in a different league, it's not in production yet.
 

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Maybe if the car is a super rare, collector's item show car, it could be considered an investment.
I also agree that what your father did, sethsmom, was not an investment but more of a job....at least in the technical sense.
 

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Many of the original Shelby Mustangs and Cobras are selling for $500,000 to over $1 mil at the various actions. The original list price was $5000 to over $7000, I believe.

I don't think that the new GT 500 will lose money. It's price should increase down the road.

The Chevy 789 is in a different league, it's not in production yet.
There are very few original Shelby's. In the greatest years of production you are looking at 2000 cars made. The new shelby mustangs are going to be limited to 10,000. You are kidding yourself if you think you will be making that kind of money on this car in 40 years. lol. Say you put that same 7000 in 1965 into the stock market. The average yearly return on the stockmarket since 1963 is 11 percent+. 7000 with compound interest (just once a year) over 42 years in the stockmarket is 560,612.98. If you compounded monthly your 7000 would be worth 695,661.83. That shelby looks like a great investment now huh?
 

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I beg to differ. My dad supported my family for about 6 yrs(paid his way through college as well as our bills) on investing in cars. He'd buy older cars that had something wrong(or a lot of things wrong) and he'd fix and resell them. He did all the work himself, so his out of pocket cost was minimal, maximizing his profit. There was one car I remember very well that he bought for a couple hundred with a blown motor and a horrible paint job. He fixed it up real nice, airbrushed a spider on the hood, and resold it for over $5,000. It was a 77 or 78 Chevy Monza Spider. I would definitely call that and all the others he fixed up an investment.

I vote GT500 fastback only because I don't think they look right as a convertible. I'd have to agree with whoever said the old ones were better. They just don't make cars like they used to IMO.
Where are we talking about buying and fixing old cars. The OP was not talking about an old car, but a brand new car.
 

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I have to say when he originally mentioned it, I thought he was talking about the old Shelby's....which, IMO, are the only real ones. Because, like ianiwane says, you can't expect the new cars to last as long as the older ones, nor be worth as much. Supply & Demand is the main reason, as the older ones were extremely limited production.
 

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I vote for the Chevy 789. There are no other new cars that are even close to looking like that. You will certainly be the only one on the block with one of those.
 

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$150k or whatever that one costs is pretty insane. You could buy a pretty pimped out classic Chevy (or Mustang) for about 1/3 that. Not a "true" Shelby, mind you, but just about anything else including Shelby clones. But, hey, if you have $150k to dish out on a car, more power to you :proud:
 

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I have always wished to own a Shelby GT 500 fastback and the price is always going up and up,so it looks like who ever bought one as an investment years ago is smiling right now.
My vote: Shelby GT 500 fastback.
 
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