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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Current bulk head fittings have a slip on for tube, and I am going to use PVC instead, so I need to get threaded bulk head fittings rather than these slip on ones that came with my tank. Where do you suggest I buy them from? Several web sites say FIPT as an option, I don't know what that is. I need the drainpipe and return inside of the tank to just slip in that how my overflow is setup now and the underside I need to be threaded.

I need
3/4" bulkhead, washer, and nut
1" bulkhead, washer, and nut

Thanks.
 

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I have found that bulkhead fittings are tough to find locally. I usually get mine from Savko. Here is a link (offsite) to the page on bulkhead fittings - http://www.savko.com/partlist.asp?pgid=2

Note one important factor - There are the Schedule 80 bulkhead fittings and the lightweight bulkhead fittings. They require different size holes. My personal preference is for the Schedule 80 parts, since they a less prone to break. I've had a few of the lightweight ones break off over the years.

FIPT = Female Internal Pipe Threads

I'm not quite sure what your trying to do or why you need FIPT fittings. This is usually more work to install, since you have to screw else into the bulkhead fitting and so on. It's also another place to leak.

If this is because you want to be able to disconnect it at that point, you are much better off using unions after the bulkhead fitting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have found that bulkhead fittings are tough to find locally. I usually get mine from Savko. Here is a link (offsite) to the page on bulkhead fittings - http://www.savko.com/partlist.asp?pgid=2

Note one important factor - There are the Schedule 80 bulkhead fittings and the lightweight bulkhead fittings. They require different size holes. My personal preference is for the Schedule 80 parts, since they a less prone to break. I've had a few of the lightweight ones break off over the years.

FIPT = Female Internal Pipe Threads

I'm not quite sure what your trying to do or why you need FIPT fittings. This is usually more work to install, since you have to screw else into the bulkhead fitting and so on. It's also another place to leak.

If this is because you want to be able to disconnect it at that point, you are much better off using unions after the bulkhead fitting.
Thank you for the info. Here is the problem I have. Inside of the tank, I need those to both be slip for my drain and return pipe to just slip in, from side the tank. Under the tank, right now I have the slip kind where I have to put a plastic tubing over it then a clamp, I wanted to get threaded under or something so I can connect to PVC, rather than have to use this plastic tube. Wish I could take a picture to explain better. What I have right now is ribbed on the bottom. I don't see how I would put PVC pipe on it? Bottom of my bulk head fitting looks like where I would have to slip tube over it and use clamp to hold it on. I would rather use PVC and glue it on or threaded PVC.

http://www.marinedepot.com/Insert_R...ttings-Plumbing_Parts-FT6243-FIFTFICO-vi.html


Also, when buying new bulk head fittings, do you measure, the inner hold size and that what I need to order for example, the 1 inch hold size ID, the OD that fits on the glass is 2.5 inches, so when order do I go with the ID? and it will just be large on the outside?

Thanks all for your help, just want to get this right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The one on the left is 2 inch OD & 3/4 inch ID
The one on the right is 2.5 inch OD & 1 inch ID

My understanding with the 2 bulkheads I have now, the only way to connect them is with flex PVC tubing, not the white hard PVC.

I want to use the white hard PVC.
 

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Ah, I see now.

You have bulkhead fittings with hose barb or insert connections. They are specifically made to connect to flexible PVC tubing, like the stuff that comes with canister filters. In other words, you have the wrong bulkhead fittings to use with PVC pipe.

While this will work, in my opinion it's far from ideal. I much prefer using standard PVC plumbing fittings and either rigid or flexible PVC pipe. Flexible PVC pipe is also known as spa flex.

Note the link I posted in my original reply - Here is is again for reference - http://www.savko.com/partlist.asp?pgid=2

Note the size numbers. This is the size of the pipe you can connect to the fitting. In the parens is the size hole you need to install the fitting. So if you want to use 1" pipe, you get a 1" fitting, and for a Schedule 80 fitting, you need to drill a 1 7/8" to 2" hole. Note that a lightweight bulkhead fitting uses a somewhat smaller hole, only 1 3/4", but takes the same pipe.

If your going to use threaded bulkheads, you then use a threaded bushing to connect the bulkhead to the pipe. You can also find other types of threaded fittings to connect a threaded bulkhead to larger or smaller pipe or to a threaded valve.

Usually I prefer slip bulkhead fittings, and just glue the pipe into it.
 

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I found what works but it must not be popular because they only have it in half inch, but I think this is whats needed slip x twist you would still have to use a short piece of flex to make this connection then you could use schedule 40 if you could find one in the correct size.

Why don't you just drain the tank and replace the bulkhead fitting, I think it would be a lot safer with pipe that big.
 

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Take those with you to Home Depot or your local hardware and see if you can get a match on the threads using a FPT to slip/glue adapter, if the thread is a match you can just cut off the barbed end and discard it, dope up the threads and tighten, then start glueing up your new plumbing. That's all I got Jim.

Look here, these should do it PVC-Female-Adapter-Spigot

This is assuming that there is enough thread left over after they are installed with washers and the nut, so you should mock it up and see if you have atleast 3/4 to an inch to screw on the adapter.
 

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Take those with you to Home Depot or your local hardware and see if you can get a match on the threads using a FPT to slip/glue adapter, if the thread is a match you can just cut off the barbed end and discard it, dope up the threads and tighten, then start glueing up your new plumbing. ...
Oh if it only worked that way. The threads on a bulkhead fitting, where you use the nut and washer to install it, are not pipe threads. They are standard threads. Pipe threads are tapered so that as you tighten the joint, the connection get tighter. This is why you can get a good seal using just that thin layer of teflon tape.

In other words, no pipe threaded fitting is going to be able to correctly mate with the external threads on the bulkhead fitting.

As you point out, the best solution is to replace the bulkhead fittings. The next best would be to just use clear plastic hose, and live with that.
 

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I have found that bulkhead fittings are tough to find locally. I usually get mine from Savko. Here is a link (offsite) to the page on bulkhead fittings - http://www.savko.com/partlist.asp?pgid=2

Note one important factor - There are the Schedule 80 bulkhead fittings and the lightweight bulkhead fittings. They require different size holes. My personal preference is for the Schedule 80 parts, since they a less prone to break. I've had a few of the lightweight ones break off over the years.

FIPT = Female Internal Pipe Threads

I'm not quite sure what your trying to do or why you need FIPT fittings. This is usually more work to install, since you have to screw else into the bulkhead fitting and so on. It's also another place to leak.

If this is because you want to be able to disconnect it at that point, you are much better off using unions after the bulkhead fitting.
A union gives you three places to leak instead of 2. It can leak where the pip enters both sides whether glued or screwed and also where the large part screws the union together.
 

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A union gives you three places to leak instead of 2. It can leak where the pip enters both sides whether glued or screwed and also where the large part screws the union together.
In my opinion, while this is sort of true, if you properly glue the pipe and union, you will almost never leak there. I don't think I've ever had one in that location.

Screw threads can be a little more tricky, but even there, you'll seldom get a leak as long as you wrap a few turns of teflon tape around the threads.

As for the union connection itself. Clean the O ring and union ends, lube the o ring with silicon grease and install, tighten it hand tight, and about 1/4 turn more, and that will not leak either.

I suspect that if your having such issues, you should review how you are assembling the pipe and fittings and unions. This stuff is made to go together quickly and easily, with no leaks.

All the being said, you only install unions where you need to be able to take the thing apart on a regular basis. For those once every 5 year issues, where you need to take something apart, I'll cut the pipe and then reconnect it with a coupling or union then. I usually keep a few around for such problems.
 

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Pixel Prestidigitator
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Yeah Dave I am all too familiar with unions and the tricks to get them to seal. In my last house I had the well pumps hooked up with them so that when one went bad you didn't need to cut anything. Just unscrew and replace. All galvanized fittings. Personally I like the flex on sumps.
 
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