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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been noticing some holes in the larger leaves of my ludwigia lately. None of my critters that I keep in the tank should eat these plants, but i do have some seed shrimp.
Any ideas as to what may be wrong here? Thanks!
 

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hmm... thanks!
if i start dosing some ferts, should this go away? Should I go with Flourish?
Flourish comprehensive will solve this problem for the short term, but the Ludwigia won't completely change and grow the best it can since flourish comp. has macro nutrients (N, P, K) in very marginal amounts - not nearly enough to serve plants' needs. I recommend dry ferts for this --- "nilocg" on these forums is an excellent seller and source of help when it comes to ferts and dosing, maybe you want to try dry ferts (they're cheaper in the long run and will give you growth you wont believe is possible)
 

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aquanoob can you take a few more photographs of the ludwigia and any other plants in the tank that are doing the same things?

If it was potassium deficiency you'd expect to see other plants showing similar holes in the older growth only.

Do you have nerites?

What ferts are you adding right now?


Also, only one deficiency can affect plants at a time.
 

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kidgrave - you were thinking the right way but unfortunately that chart you found is almost entirely incorrect. Whoever made it got almost all of the symptoms and locations of each kind of damage wrong.

aquanoob's plant damage might be potassium deficiency since the symptoms of pinholes in older leaves (starting about a third of the way down from the growing tip to the base of the plant) match. The holes also have the chlorosis that usually surrounds each hole, however the problem still might be caused by other factors like nerite snail damage. If he is adding potassium regularly then the issue may not be potassium deficiency. We just need to know more information before definitively being able to show what the damage is from. Personally I'd love it if it was potassium deficiency since I don't really have any potassium deficient Ludwigia photos on the Deficiency Finder site.

In case anyone is interested in Mn deficiency here is a Mn deficiency/toxicity write up I did just recently. Just a side node - Mn deficiency is extremely rare since it is needed in such tiny amounts.

From:http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/...s/94114-toxidity-deficiency-2.html#post702314

Mn's Role
Mn's main role in photosynthesis is its involvement in the water splitting system of photosystem II. It is also involved in metabolic processes such as respiration, photosynthesis, synthesis of aminoacids and hormone activation. Mn is also used as a cofactor in an enzyme called superoxide dismutase which is an extremely important enzyme that helps stop oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species and other radicals that are made by photosynthesis. Therefore, when Mn is deficient it is dangerous for the plant because it affects photosystem II which provides the necessary electrons for photosynthesis and at the same time reduces the plant's ability to prevent damage by reactive oxygen species.

Mn Deficiency
Mn deficiency occurs most often when the pH is between 7.3-8.5, when the CaCO3 levels and organic levels are high. Also, chelated Mn is absorbed by plants more slowly than free Mn ions. Mn is an immobile nutrient, and therefore cannot be transported out of old growth so all effects show up on newer leaves (but not the very newest leaves).

Mn deficiency becomes unmistakable only when the growth rate is extremely slowed down. It shows up as diffuse interveinal chlorosis on young fully formed leaves (which differs from iron deficiency which shows up on the very newest small not fully formed leaves first). Severe necrotic spots or streaks may also form in Mn deficiency. Symptoms often appear first on the middle leaves. In mild cases the symptoms appear on young leaves and disappear as the leaf matures. Young leaves often show a network of green veins in a lighter green background, closely resembling iron chlorosis.

Interestingly, in contrast to iron deficiency the chlorosis from Mn deficiency is not uniformly distributed over the entire leaf and the leaf tissue may rapidly become necrotic.

It can be difficult to tell early Mn deficiency apart from iron deficiency, but late Mn deficiency leaves start dying rapidly and necrotic lesions develop.

Mn Toxicity
Mn can be extremely toxic to plant cells. Toxicity occurs mainly in acidic conditions with low organic content in the environment. Mn uptake does not appear to be tightly controlled.

Toxicity causes plants to slow down their growth rate, but you will also see interveinal and marginal chlorosis in older leaves. Necrotic leaf spots are also very common and so is leaf wrinkling. These symptoms can occur all over the whole plant (new and old growth) but in terrestrial plants is focused mainly in the old growth. Mn toxicity can sometimes appear similar to Fe deficiency due to the chlorosis. Toxicity of Mn is also made worse if other nutrients are in low concentrations (Ca, Mg, K, Fe), and in general higher Ca and Mg levels make micro nutrients less toxic and protect plants.

From:
Handbook of Plant Nutrition by Allen V. Barker & David J. Pilbeam​

From:
Manganese as essential and toxic element for plants: transport, accumulation and resistance mechanisms, by R. Millaleo et al.,​
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey guys, life has been crazy the past several months... (New baby, etc.) my apologies for not responding! Thanks to all of you for the info!!
 
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