The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently have a 29 gallon low tech tank with plants and am running into (surprise, surprise) some algae issues. Thanks for those who helped with the advise on reducing the photoperiod, raising the light.
These measures have really helped (as have the 5 otos and rubber lipped pleco I added!!)
Still with a fair amount of brown hairs growing on the margins of many leaves. If it were not for the ugliness facotr, the plants and fish do not seem to mind. Plants growing new leaves like mad and the fishare thriving.

This is not a tank specific question, just a general one regarding the BEST tank inhabitants to control algae. The LFS guy recommended SAE's but I am not convinced they are all that great at eating algae except when young.
I have otos and a pleco and am considering adding some shrimp if anybody thinks they would help. ( I will be moving the 3 clown loaches out to the 75 gallon, so shrimp would be a legitimate possibility)

latest tank parameters:
pH 6.8, KH 80, GH 60, NO2 0, NO3 10-15


thanks for the help!


29gallon
HOB penquin filter 200 with biowheel (rated for 50 gallon tank)
hagan glo T5HO 24W single light fixture
substrate is fluorite with sand and pebble overlay
lots of driftwood, plants include java fern, anubias, various crypts, hornwort, onion plant, hairgrass
small UV sterilizer (green killing machine)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks!

wow, VERY nice article. I think a lot of what I have heard and read must apply to the Chinese and not the Siamese algae eater. I really do trust my LFS guy. (Actually not local at all, but I am willing to drive an hour to get healthy fish and dependable advise)
He said "make sure to get a REAL SAE" and now I know what he means. I hope it is easy to tell the difference when looking with what type you get.
I like the snail section and LOVE snails, but think my pH is too low for snails (6.8)

thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
The "True" SAE is Crossocheilus siamensis. It's black stripe is saw-toothed and extends into the tail. When it rests on the bottom, it sits on its fins, so it's belly doesn't touch.

The "Chinese" is Gyrinocheilus aymonieri and is often sold as the SAE (by the "unlearned" people) at some stores. (I know from experience, I presently have 2 in my tank. They are presently "small" but they will be removed in a few months.) Their "stripe" is spotted and ends before the tail. These fish rest on their bellies on the bottom.

Your LFS should be able to order them via their scientific name.

From the article and what people are saying here, it takes several types of eaters in a tank to do the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
SAEs never worked out for me (the true SAE). They're fine until they come across fishfood. At that point they forget that algae even exists. They did love my flame moss though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
SAEs never worked out for me (the true SAE). They're fine until they come across fishfood. At that point they forget that algae even exists. They did love my flame moss though.
x2....

even true SAEs are not a reliable algae eating fish, only put them in your tank if you like the way they look, if you get one that stays interested in eating algae look at it as a bonus. They are also very hard to catch if you want to remove them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
x2....

even true SAEs are not a reliable algae eating fish, only put them in your tank if you like the way they look, if you get one that stays interested in eating algae look at it as a bonus. They are also very hard to catch if you want to remove them.
My experience with SAE's is the same as with plecos; they eat algae while they are young but as they age and grow they have no or only a passing interest in algae. They just sit around waiting for their nightly algae wafer. It is true, SAE's are very hard to catch. I recently purchase a pair for my 40 gallon and the it took the poor girl at the LFS about ten minutes to catch them. Three years ago in that same 40 gallon aquarium I had to drain almost all the water out of the aquarium (I was changing the substrate) before I could net them.

Ottos seem to do a better job and it is always a challenge to find them all hiding in your aquarium.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
great advice

thanks for the advise. My plan at this point is to move the clown loaches to the 75 gallon tank that I have prepped for them (lots of water movement, sand substrate, many safe hiding places) and THEN put in some amanos and a couple true SAE. I have a feeling the loaches might really LIKE :icon_lol: to snuggle up to those shrimp.
Then we'll see how the battle against the algae ensues!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
I swear by SAE's, but I think what is said here about them not being miracle workers is true. They're much better at eating algae when they're young. At least, mine were. Also, as someone already said, they seem to like flake food better. (on a positive note, they enjoy eating/cleaning up the leftovers on the bottom of the tank that my other higher swimming fish won't touch) Nonetheless, I see them still cleaning off the edges of my leaves pretty often. It's good that they have big appetites.
Also, there's the possible issue that some individuals have more of a taste than others do. I bought two at the same time. One nearly burst from eating so much hair algae, while the other stayed small and didn't really care for it. Or for anything for that matter. He just chills out under a log and doesn't like to be very active.

I like supplementing them with amano shrimp and otos, though not really because I believe they're fantastic at eating algae, but because I love them. ^_^

When it comes to cleaning glass, though, I'd have to say that the best algae cleaning creature is me.
 

·
Aroid Addict
Joined
·
3,493 Posts
My Nerite snails outperform anything else I've tried. Amanos, SAE's other snails, mollies and shrimp don't even come close to eating as much algae as my Nerites do. The trade off is that Nerites will lay eggs EVERYWHERE! They don't hatch, luckily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
My experience with SAE's is that they would only eat algae. I never once saw them feed when I fed the other fish. They lived for a long time too. I'd guess that they were over 5 years old before they died.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
The Florida Flagfish is the best hair algae eater. A bit aggressive but it will flat out clear a tank of hair algae. I'd have one if I didn't have guppies and shrimp both of which I'm breeding. The Flagfish wouldn't bother the adults too much, but they are tough on the fry.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top