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I'll post a short background on how the tank got to this point below, but does anyone know what's going on here / seen this before:

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Short background: last summer I went on a long-ish vacation (10 days) and asked my non-fish keeping neighbor to feed my small cohort of nano-fish once and a pinch during the time I was gone. If you guessed I came home to an extreme excess of food all over the substrate... you guessed right. I tried to counteract the damage, but with a tank this small and our city water being 8.0+ pH out of the tap, I think the incessant water changes I was doing to try and combat the algae growth at the time was too much for my livestock. They've all since passed and I decided to mostly leave the tank alone with only plants until it stabilized... instead it did this. The whitish circles appear to be trapped pockets of gas, either oxygen from the plants, or possibly a byproduct of some other process. I'm not sure what's going on, but the solution seems to be to just tear it down and start over. However, if it can be salvaged as is, I'd like to try as both an experiment and lesson in art of maintaining a planted tank.
 

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Yes, we've seen this before. It's called poor tank maintenance. We've all done it. Aquariums are like civilizations. They go through dark ages. These are periods of neglect and consequent deterioration. The good news is that there is a renaissance coming. It will be glorious. What are the water parameters? If your Nitrate is over 50 ppm you should increase your tank maintenance. Try reducing your TDS if it's too high and at least wipe the algae off of the front side of the tank so we can see your plants better. Check your filtration to see if it's still viable. You may have to cycle your tank if the filter is not working. Keep "feeding" your tank if it's not inhabited.
 

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You have blue green algae (which is actually not a type of algae, but cyanobacteria). Generally, you'll want to remove as much as possible (it should come off in large sheets). The more you can remove, the better, as leaving even small patches will cause it to grow back quickly.

Once you have done that (and be persistent day after day at manually removing it), you will need to fix your water parameters to prevent it from growing back.

There are other ways to remove the bacteria (e.g. with antibiotics), but a lot of dying/decomposing organic matter will drop the oxygen levels in the aquarium very quickly.
 
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