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PH/KH Chart -OR- Drop Checker

  • PH/KH chart

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  • Drop Checker

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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
so i did some test on my tank and i just wanted some inputs from follow hobbyist who's had better results let me know your thoughts...

did a PH/KH chart and says i have about 25-30 ppm of co2
Mines read at PH:6.8-6.9 ---- KH: 6 Degree



Looked at my Drop check and it shows a dark green color for 25-30 ppm of co2



so whats more accurate?
 

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that is true... let me update a new chart lol someone was drunk when they made this chart but it wasnt me xD
LOL that looks more like it.

In my limited experience, I'll say that I am trying both. I have a cheapo $10 drop checker and it's pretty difficult to discern the color once it's not solid blue (is it blue green/green/yellow green? I don't know). I've been testing my pH and dKH with liquid test kits and I have similar issues with that. I feel like my KH is often between 4 and 5. The API ph test kit goes from 7.2 to 7.6 on the chart and I feel like I'm in the middle.

I am trying to keenly observe both the plants' growth and my livestock's response to the co2 and i'm slowly adjusting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
true and thats what i ment... do from a normal drop check can show a lime green and with to many drops it can show a dark green and be the same as a light green so how would one know if their at the right level with a drop checker?
 

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A drop checker is a tool, not an accurate way to measure the amount of CO2 in the water. It lets you confidently add CO2 until you are in the right ballpark for having an optimum amount in the water - when the solution is green to yellow-green. After that you have to slowly change the CO2 bubble rate, while observing both the fish for bad effects and the plants for good effects. When the plants no longer show good effects - more healthy looking growth, more pearling, faster growth, you have an optimum bubble rate for your tank with those particular conditions. But, if the fish start clustering at the surface, usually in a corner, or laying on the substrate, or show fading colors, you have too much CO2 for your tank, your fish, and your conditions. Without spending money in the $3000 ballpark there is no accurate way to measure the amount of CO2 in the water, and even if you could, you would still need to fine tune the bubble rate to get the optimum amount for your tank, your fish, and your conditions.
 

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I'm still a newbie as far as planted tanks go and in particular hi-tech ones, but I think the labels on the chart are off. The area to the left of the green band should be red (too much CO2) and the right side should be yellow (not enough).
You're objecting to the color of the chart because it wasn't color coordinated to the pH fluid?

Anyway, the pH/kH only works accurately if there is nothing else in the water that would alter pH. Unfortunately, that's often not the case.
 
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