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What the heck is wrong with my cordora's eye?

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I have a 10 gallon low tech planted tank with 3 bronze corydoras and 1 amano shrimp.
Today during my water change I noticed a white, cloudy slightly raised spot on one of my cory's eyes. From what I can tell he is the only fish affected and it's only on one of his eyes. Does anyone have any idea what this is and how I can treat it?

):

Also sorry for the crappy picture quality it's the best I could do with my phone. In the pic with 2 corys it's the one in back not the one eating the bloodworm.

Thanks,
kt

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Some basics are needed to begin to sort out fish diseases. Some things like how long the tank has been up and running. Is it cycled or new? Temperature and other water tests are a good place to start. Lots of small things to make narrowing it down will help get less than random guesses. Tests to weed out that the tank water is bad are my place to start.
I start with making certain the water is good before moving on to treatments.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Some basics are needed to begin to sort out fish diseases. Some things like how long the tank has been up and running. Is it cycled or new? Temperature and other water tests are a good place to start. Lots of small things to make narrowing it down will help get less than random guesses. Tests to weed out that the tank water is bad are my place to start.
I start with making certain the water is good before moving on to treatments.

It's been cycled for a while now. Sorry for not including this stuff in the original post I'd still consider myself to be kind of a newbie, still learning stuff. :)
For the temp it's currently at 78 F (It's usually in the high 70's)
PH: ~7.2
Ammonia: 0ppm
Nitrite: 0ppm
Nitrate: 5.0ppm

Thank you for the quick reply btw !

Bump:
10G is small for these cories. Small tanks provide little space for larger fish so the water quality goes down quickly. They belong in a 29 G tank or you can do water changes almost every day.
I wasn't aware that my tank was too small. I was told by multiple people that 3 would be a good amount for my tank. ): I'm not sure that I can afford a new tank , but I will absolutely try and do more water changes. Thanks for the information.
 

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Your cories will be okay in the 10, you'll just want to water changes more frequently than normal. I had albinos in a 20 and even they weren't happy, I didn't start getting eggs until I put them in a 29. In a few weeks they'll be in a 55.

Also, I want to add that cories prefer sand over gravel. Comfier to rest on, and it allows them to sift.

As for the eye, get on those water changes. Maybe a half dose of ParaGuard or other gentle medication, since copies absolutely do not do aquarium salt. I had this happen to my 20 when I added some baby angels in. Their eyes looked like someone put foggy filmy ash trays on them and then everything went to h*ll. Cories are sensitive little buggers, so trying to be as gentle as possible (like doing more water changes over medicating) is best. If water changes aren't doing it, try a gentle invert safe med.

Is your filater rated for the tank size, or overboard? The higher the overfilter, the more you can get away with minor overstock (your tank is biologically full right now).
 

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The tests would seem to indicate that the water is okay so maybe that's a problem or not for later. Right now would be a good time to do extra water changes as I find good water is by far the best, easy, cheap med around. How the future goes is still undetermined for me. Three cories is not what i would call overcrowded. But then I aso think of cories as small fish. They are among the smallest I keep except fry growing out to bigger!
But how I determine crowded is more a factor of how the maintenance/water change /cleaning filters goes. If the tests show the water is not collecting too much in the way of nitrate for my cleaning and water changes, I go with it. That does assume that the filter is able to process any ammonia and nitrite down the line to nitrate. With plants, I find the nitrate stays lower also, so that leaves me just watching how it is working more than have a number of fish in mind.

But for the current question, I see nothing major wrong but would watch for getting better/ getting worse. Sometimes a cloudy eye can come from a temporary stress/ getting knocked around or it could be a disease beginning to show. My cories seem to give me no trouble except jumping out so I'm not very up on their personal treatments. I might suggest Pimafix and Melafix as my go to's for general treatment of other fish.
Maybe others with more corie trouble experience can tell you how they would go and if the meds I mention are safe for cories.
I like those two as they are low level, cheap and seem to help head off things that I can't really ID so that I rarely get the full blown disease outbreaks. Maybe watch that one guy really close for a hazey look spreading over other parts or if the eye gets worse?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Your cories will be okay in the 10, you'll just want to water changes more frequently than normal. I had albinos in a 20 and even they weren't happy, I didn't start getting eggs until I put them in a 29. In a few weeks they'll be in a 55.

Also, I want to add that cories prefer sand over gravel. Comfier to rest on, and it allows them to sift.

As for the eye, get on those water changes. Maybe a half dose of ParaGuard or other gentle medication, since copies absolutely do not do aquarium salt. I had this happen to my 20 when I added some baby angels in. Their eyes looked like someone put foggy filmy ash trays on them and then everything went to h*ll. Cories are sensitive little buggers, so trying to be as gentle as possible (like doing more water changes over medicating) is best. If water changes aren't doing it, try a gentle invert safe med.

Is your filater rated for the tank size, or overboard? The higher the overfilter, the more you can get away with minor overstock (your tank is biologically full right now).
Thank you for the response :) As for the substrate - I imagine it would be a difficult process to replace it but I heard that pool filtration sand is a cheap and decent option. I would love to switch to sand, I'm just not sure how to go about it.

I'll definitely be doing more frequent water changes now that I know I kinda overstocked.. :frown2:

What size of filter would you recommend to have a good amount of over-filtration without having too strong of water flow? (I currently have just a 10gal)

-kt
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The tests would seem to indicate that the water is okay so maybe that's a problem or not for later. Right now would be a good time to do extra water changes as I find good water is by far the best, easy, cheap med around. How the future goes is still undetermined for me. Three cories is not what i would call overcrowded. But then I aso think of cories as small fish. They are among the smallest I keep except fry growing out to bigger!
But how I determine crowded is more a factor of how the maintenance/water change /cleaning filters goes. If the tests show the water is not collecting too much in the way of nitrate for my cleaning and water changes, I go with it. That does assume that the filter is able to process any ammonia and nitrite down the line to nitrate. With plants, I find the nitrate stays lower also, so that leaves me just watching how it is working more than have a number of fish in mind.

But for the current question, I see nothing major wrong but would watch for getting better/ getting worse. Sometimes a cloudy eye can come from a temporary stress/ getting knocked around or it could be a disease beginning to show. My cories seem to give me no trouble except jumping out so I'm not very up on their personal treatments. I might suggest Pimafix and Melafix as my go to's for general treatment of other fish.
Maybe others with more corie trouble experience can tell you how they would go and if the meds I mention are safe for cories.
I like those two as they are low level, cheap and seem to help head off things that I can't really ID so that I rarely get the full blown disease outbreaks. Maybe watch that one guy really close for a hazey look spreading over other parts or if the eye gets worse?
My corys seem to be pretty happy and are always schooling together, so I think they will be fine too. I am going to be doing more frequent water changes and hopefully that will help to clear things up with his eye. I'm hoping that it was just stress or a small injury too and nothing bad like a disease or parasite ): That would be nearly impossible to treat with my shrimp in the tank. I would prefer to use medicine as a "last resort only" kind of option because with my shrimp I have to be extra careful when adding anything to my tank.
Thank you for the response!
 

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If fish are netted, they can wind up with the ey being kind of "rubbed" so that it looks funny for a time. I would watch and wait. Depending on your personal view, I might suggest just adding to the gravel rather than changing. I now use a mix on all tanks i set as it arranges itself in a way that I find more natural. I'm not an ocean/beach guy but rivers and lakes are what I see most and they are never one solid type of bottom.
It also fits my low stress style better? I keep a 2 liter bottle with the bottom cut out for the job of adding without creating the dust storm, too bad.
I fill the bottle, hold my thumb over the opening and slowly push the bottle to the bottom to then release the new as I move around the tank. It helps to lower the tank water while doing this but I do the job without moving fish out, etc. Turning off the filter helps, too.
 

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You aren't overstocked, you're just exactly on the margin.

Replacing substrate isn't difficult, per say, just time consuming and you'd need somewhere to put the old gravel. Can't exactly just toss that in the bin, you know? Pool filtration sand and play sand both make great substrates, I can't find decently-priced pool filtration sand near me but I know it exists so if you find it go for it, means less washing for you.

A 15-20g filter would give you adequate overfiltration. It's not necessary, I just always prefer knowing that my filter absolutely can handle the entire bioload of the tank. Yours works fine if your parameters areally coming out so nicely, you'd have no problem keeping just your 10g filter.

Just keep an eye on the little guy. Pimafix and Melafix are gentle enough for cories, they're just extremely weak and designed to make you need to come back and buy more. Yay marketing lol they do work for catching problems quickly, and treating mild issues, though. As long as his quality of life doesn't seem to go down (no white fuzz forming between armor plates, no ring or solid film forming over eye, no hyperventilation, no erratic/desperate swimming, etc.) he should be just fine.
 

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Cloudy eyes are a sign of bacterial infection. Most often due to poor water quality, but can also result from a vulnerable damaged eye (physical injury).

It's simple to treat. Fish can often heal from it by themselves without any medication as long as the water quality is kept in good health. Obviously a better diet can only help in recovery.

Melafix and Pimafix do work. If the infections come back that is only because something is still wrong with your water quality.

If the eye is allowed to get worse, the cory can lose his eye, and further still, can eventually die.

As for mistergreen's loach with the long term clouded eyes, fish can get cataracts, or it may be some other irritant in the water causing excess slime coat over the eyes.
 
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