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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sorry if this is not the right place to post this, but here goes...

I have duckweed (and some other floating plant whose name I don't know) on top of my tank, and I like it a lot, but I don't know the best way to deal with the little bits of it that get sucked out when I'm doing water changes.

I know it's invasive, so I am really worried about disposing of it in the right way.

For the ones I pick out by hand, I put them in the trash. But the ones that make their way into the "dirty" water that needs to be disposed of.... what do I do?

Halp! :confused:
 

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Just run the water though a net as you dispose of it, however that may be. I learned the hard way that you should always do that when I accidentally poured 5 or 6 baby shrimp down a drain when I was doing a water change.
 

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Although most sewage gets treated in such a way that the duckweed would be killed, its a good sign of a responsible hobbyist to be concerned about where it ends up. The method 'Seargent Dude' stated is a good way to ensure you grab all the floater bits out, then you can throw it away. Another idea is to add a bit of bleach to the bucket before flushing it. I keep my water change vessels separate. One for throw away water, and one for new water. That way it doesn't matter what I put into the 'gray water' bucket, I know it will never have any negative affects on the new water I'm adding to the aquarium.
 

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You can put a pantyhose on the bucket end of the siphon tube to catch duckweed and debris. You can't easily clean/reuse the pantyhose, however, so that's mostly if you're trying to clear a lot of stuff from the tank.

Can also give excess duckweed to friends with critters that eat it. Goldies do, I think. Tanks are best, of course; you *can* give it to friends with ponds, but there is the risk of it getting into natural waterways via run-off, flooding, birds, etc.
 

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You can put a pantyhose on the bucket end of the siphon tube to catch duckweed and debris. You can't easily clean/reuse the pantyhose, however, so that's mostly if you're trying to clear a lot of stuff from the tank.

Can also give excess duckweed to friends with critters that eat it. Goldies do, I think. Tanks are best, of course; you *can* give it to friends with ponds, but there is the risk of it getting into natural waterways via run-off, flooding, birds, etc.
Never, ever put it in a pond.... gosh....

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I think H2Ogal's method might be the easiest, and it should work for almost anything, nylons, filter bags, filter socks, even just a regular old sock.

As to throwing out duckweed (and other plants), it's probably best to let it dry out first, but that's probably a fairly minor issue. I've got a small glass bowl sitting on my stove that I use for this - sitting it near the pilot light or the oven vent helps speed the drying process, even if I'm not cooking anything.

If you have indoor plants (or even outdoor, so long as there isn't a waterbody/drainage ditch nearby) You could always just use the water for them. I've noticed frogbit that I throw in planters dries completely in a day or two, I imagine duckweed would take even less time.
 

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Can also give excess duckweed to friends with critters that eat it. Goldies do, I think. Tanks are best, of course; you *can* give it to friends with ponds, but there is the risk of it getting into natural waterways via run-off, flooding, birds, etc.
Never, ever put it in a pond.... gosh....

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Obviously, there are ways for it to escape, as I pointed out in my post. But some hobbyists do use duckweed deliberately in self-contained ponds. I had a conversation just the other day with someone in the forums who grows duckweed for his pond, where the apple and trapdoor snails eat it non-stop.
 

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Obviously, there are ways for it to escape, as I pointed out in my post. But some hobbyists do use duckweed deliberately in self-contained ponds. I had a conversation just the other day with someone in the forums who grows duckweed for his pond, where the apple and trapdoor snails eat it non-stop.
Still a reckless suggestion. Have we learned nothing from those goofs in the south who thought Asian carp were a good idea and would not get away. Very irresponsible suggestion.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You can put a pantyhose on the bucket end of the siphon tube to catch duckweed and debris. You can't easily clean/reuse the pantyhose, however, so that's mostly if you're trying to clear a lot of stuff from the tank.

Can also give excess duckweed to friends with critters that eat it. Goldies do, I think. Tanks are best, of course; you *can* give it to friends with ponds, but there is the risk of it getting into natural waterways via run-off, flooding, birds, etc.
Such a good idea for the pantyhose! Thanks! And I'm totally giving it away to be eaten!

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Lets not talk about those carp... freakin idiots.

Duckweed is found just about everywhere... not a big deal. It also floats, so net it out of the bucket before you dump it out. Or flush it, highly unlikely its going anywhere but certain destruction. Duckweed is tough, but it aint that tough...
 
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