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I don't know it, but this looks very similar to an ermersed plant I just collected in central Ohio (in a seasonally wet area) that I am trying to get ID'd.

I can't get my pics to upload for some reason, but here is a thread I started. Take a look at the first plant:
https://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/plant-id/145143-central-ohio-wetland-help.html
https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/33-plants/1314569-central-ohio-plant-id.html#post11380655

At the risk of doing so without a flower, I believe I have the first ID'd as a Lysimachia sp., probably L. nummularia, due to it's growth habit, and the habitat in which it is seen here (seasonal wetland/wet forests, etc.).
While there are no flowers on these (and the suspected species flowers in June/July), I did confirm tiny red dots covering the leaves using a 10x hand lens.
Not sure if this is what you've got, but it's a start.
 

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Pelvicachromis Lover!
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It looks like Cardamine lyrata to me. I had some in my 75g back when I was running it as a high-tech tank.

Bump: Here are pictures of it in my 75g. It's on the far right side of the tank, looks rather whispery with very thin stems. It never liked my tank that much, but it's supposed to be pretty easy to grow.

Pictures of the Cardamine lyrata n my 75g.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It looks like Cardamine lyrata to me. I had some in my 75g back when I was running it as a high-tech tank.

Bump: Here are pictures of it in my 75g. It's on the far right side of the tank, looks rather whispery with very thin stems. It never liked my tank that much, but it's supposed to be pretty easy to grow.

Pictures of the Cardamine lyrata n my 75g.


thanks for the reply. I googled some photos of Cardamine lyrata and I think mine looks more similar to L. nummularia. Im not 100% sure though because L. nummularia looks to have more straight leaves while mine are more curved.
 

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Pelvicachromis Lover!
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Lysimachia nummularia has thicker leaves, kind of like Bacopa. The leaves are somewhat oval, elongated to a point at the end.

Cardamon lyrata is wispier overall. The stems and leaves are very thin and delicate, often with slender roots growing at the leaf nodes. The leaves are more rounded, kind of like a spider web. They're also wavy.

You should know soon enough as it grows. C. lyrata puts out very small leaves that reach to the light and enlarge as they get older. There's more space between leaf nodes. L. nummularia grows more compact, and even though the new leaves are smaller, the space between the new leaves and old ones is uniform through the plant.

Here are examples of the different plants: first one is Lysimachia nummularia and the second one is Cardamon lyrata.



The above picture is from davesgarden.com.
 
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