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SCAPEr
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Can someone explain? I asked this because I'm bored. (waiting for my tank to cycle that is lol).

So what makes a substrate leech ammonia? Do you think its intended? Or unavoidable? Why?

i.e. We all know Aquasoil (New Amazonia) leech ammonia for about 4 weeks more or less. So no matter how much cycled filter media you put in, ammonia will still leech from the substrate (unless the media can keep up with the leeching ammonia). Also New amazonia has a great amount of fertilizer in its soil. Plus a very good buffering capacity.
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In the other side for example Akadama substrate also buffer the water down pretty good. And more interestingly it does not leech ammonia at all. But the downside is this substrate does not contain any fertilizer.
 

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Natural material: Ammonia is often the side effect of organic matter in the soil. This is especially the case with using garden soil with some compost as an aquarium substrate. The leaves, microorganisms, worm poop, and other things in the soil had some protein in them when they were alive, and this protein decomposes once the organism is dead. The nitrogen in protein becomes ammonia.

If a material is designed, made for garden or aquarium use, and has some fertilizer added, then the ammonia might have been directly added (especially for garden use) or it might be the effect of some other material like urea breaking down.
 
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