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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi people!

I'm a fairly new wine drinker. Me and my wife have picked up the addiction for trying new wines. We also just received a wine refrigerator as a gift. We're looking to stock it with lots of different varieties, so that we can develop our palate. I have no idea what i like yet... but i know that i do like Red wine more than White wine.

My question to you is: Do you have a favorite style, or variety, or grape, or perhaps a favorite winery? Do you have a "go to" wine that you get over and over?

Now, keep in mind, i don't really want to be paying more than $12-ish per bottle, yet. But if there's a wine that has really knocked your socks off, and is a bit more pricey, i'd consider it.

Thank you from a wine newbie! :thumbsup:

Scott
 

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I am new to wine as well. I have liked White Zinfandel for a couple years. I actually keep a box in my fridge all the time. I like Franzia. I pay about $20 per box, so it is very reasonably priced.

I have tried cabernet sauvignon and merlot per the advice I found on another forum and hate them both. I tried Yellow Tail, not terribly cheap, but not the best quality either. Each bottle was about $15 and they both ended up being given to my parents who actually thought they tasted ok.

To be honest the first time I tasted cabernet I really thought that it was spoiled. I just don't like it.

I suppose I like the sweeter white and not the bitter reds, though I'm open to reccomendations.
 

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Tasting wine is one of the most subjective and personal pref things I can imagine. Just because someone decides a wine is "good" doesn't mean you will like it, and vice versa. A $100 bottle will not necessarily taste better to you than a $10 bottle.

I found that most folks starting to get into wine prefer heavier, sweeter wines. As you mature (=get old) and the high sugar, high alc ones make it difficult to get up early you discover the taste of the drier wines.

Just try a wide variety to figure out what you like... If you ever go abroad, like to Europe, that's a great opportunity to sample wines. Even though you can get a bottle of wine from another country here as well, for some reason it is much different to taste a french or german or spanish wine in its proper country. For ex, I lived in Spain for a while, and am still partial to a good Rioja.

Enjoy them in small doses rather than large buckets... Enjoying a glass of wine and getting drunk are two totally different things. :eek:
 

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i like anything made by yellow tail. has a kangaroo on the bottle. but fya you shouldent store red wine in the new wine fridge. well you can but your not suposed to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Tasting wine is one of the most subjective and personal pref things I can imagine. Just because someone decides a wine is "good" doesn't mean you will like it, and vice versa. A $100 bottle will not necessarily taste better to you than a $10 bottle.

I found that most folks starting to get into wine prefer heavier, sweeter wines. As you mature (=get old) and the high sugar, high alc ones make it difficult to get up early you discover the taste of the drier wines.

Just try a wide variety to figure out what you like... If you ever go abroad, like to Europe, that's a great opportunity to sample wines. Even though you can get a bottle of wine from another country here as well, for some reason it is much different to taste a french or german or spanish wine in its proper country. For ex, I lived in Spain for a while, and am still partial to a good Rioja.

Enjoy them in small doses rather than large buckets... Enjoying a glass of wine and getting drunk are two totally different things. :eek:
Good advice! Of course, while i'm not going to take someone's advice here as "the gospel truth", it is very interesting to here people's takes on what they like, or dislike.

I've started my wine journey with the local fare. I live in a region (Southwest Michigan) that has a lot of local wineries. My house, in fact, is practically surrounded by vineyards. It seems that a large portion of their offerings, however, are "table wines". They are too sweet for my taste. They do have their more elite varieties, but i haven't tried them yet. So far, i've enjoyed a local Gerwurstraminer, and one called "Witches Brew" - which is served warm. Awesome flavor.

I do enjoy a nice buzz... but i'm also really loving the diverse flavors available. Also, wine seems to be a different kind of buzz then what i'm accustomed to with liquor and beer.

Keep it comin' guys!
 

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I personally like Merlots and Cabernet Sauvignons the best. Zinfandels are great for picnics and partying in general, where cost and volume issues come into play. I don't care for any white wine I've tasted lately. I haven't tasted any Shiraz that I like either, including Yellowtail. Shiraz tastes like watered down Merlot to me.

My favorite lately is Merryvale Starmont Cabernet Sauvignon, I can find it at Costco for $20.00 and is rated very well (like that really matters). I don't buy it that often because its still $20.00 a bottle. I buy Bogle Merlot at Costco for $7.00 a bottle. It's pretty good for the money. Crane Lake Merlot at $6.00 a bottle is pretty good to.

If you don't like red wine, everything stated is null and void.:icon_mrgr
 

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Best way to get started: Just buy a few and try them. Taste them on their own, decide what you like and dislike about each and then read reviews about them online.

If you read other tasters comments before hand you will tend to just agree with them and not develop your own palate. However, if you taste then read other reviews you can pick out things you may have missed or not known how to describe.

And also remember wines are best paired with food so look for good pairings. My favorite wine is probably Tempra Tantrum, I like having it with spicy food.
 

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Best way to get started: Just buy a few and try them. Taste them on their own, decide what you like and dislike about each and then read reviews about them online.

If you read other tasters comments before hand you will tend to just agree with them and not develop your own palate. However, if you taste then read other reviews you can pick out things you may have missed or not known how to describe.
Great advice.

I'll add: Try and find a wine shop that does a decent volume. They usually have hang tags with little blurbs on the particular wines. Give them a read. See what appeals to you and what intrigues you. Great way to find wines that fit your likes and your wallet.

After tasting you will really start to get a feel for what you like and don't like.

That is the best way to develop a palette.
 

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Generally, I find anything under $10 is pretty rancid :)
That's my only advice.

I've been keeping an excel spread sheet of all the wines I've had over the summer. I score them and describe the taste etc... You should try to keep a record of what you've had. There are so many options.
 

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Generally, I find anything under $10 is pretty rancid :)
I totally agree, however I would go as far as $15 - $20 depending on what it is.

I'm a huge fan of most Rieslings from Germany. All I basically drink is Riesling and from my experience, German Rieslings is by far the better Riesling to "me". Its clean, clear and has an incredible bouquet that finishes well. They are never bitter but some can be very sweet.

Dan
 

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my family owns a vineyard in cape cod. and I realize i am not of age but I am developing a palette for wine tasting and theirs far exceeds many others. this is a very nice place to take venture to if you are ever traveling, they do tours and tastings and it is a very nice place. Also if you are getting into the wine culture i would reccommend trying to get your hands on some Grappa. It is like a grape moonshine type alcohol that is distilled from the leftover mash from the wine making process. hard to get your hands on but well worth your while:D also rombauer(i believe is how it is spelled) is a good one to try given you can find a bottle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Also if you are getting into the wine culture i would reccommend trying to get your hands on some Grappa. It is like a grape moonshine type alcohol that is distilled from the leftover mash from the wine making process. hard to get your hands on but well worth your while:D
I tried Grappa several years ago and loved it! It was definitely a sipping drink though. Very potent.

Thanks for all your opinions, folks!

I've enjoyed some Rieslings for sure. One of our local wineries, Tabor Hill, produces a Cherry Riesling from native cherries that is fantastic.

mistergreen: good idea on the log of wines. I'd been thinking about this. How are you supposed to remember what you like? Write it down! :icon_wink
 

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Big Reds!

I think a couple people are on the right track, explore, taste, keep notes, and stay open minded. So much goes into a bottle of wine -- region, climate, growing season, vineyard manager, conditions it was harvested, different wine making techniques and styles, etc. etc.

Find a wine or a style that you like and branch out from there. Spending money on wines without knowing what you like and what to expect is foolish. Finding a good wine shop that knows their product and can coach and steer the customer is probably the best bet for most.

I live in Washington Wine Country, and a big chunk of what I do is food and wine pairings. I have a Chef's Table in the kitchen and do 7-10 course dinners several times a week. All of the menus start with the wine, then I design each course to compliment and build on the flavors of the wines, I try to create a flow as we move from one varietal to the next. It's fun!

Me, I love the Big Reds!
 

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here's a screen shot of my xls. I forgot the prices on most of them...geee, I wonder why... haha.
Nothing more than $25 for sure.
Product Rectangle Font Material property Parallel
 

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Anything in a dry red. There are several brands that are decent in a 3L box for around $20. Pinot Noir, Shiraz, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignion are all good IMO. I've had Fat Bastard before-not bad-love the name.
 

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Sample line up and a grilled prawn with Chilis Yuzu and Hamachi tartar that went with a Riesling.

That looks great!

Reminds me of a dish at the New York Water Club I had a few times. Great wine and fantastic food.

There is a restaurant that I frequent on a regular basis now for 13 years called "IL Palazzo" on Mulberry Street in Little Italy and every time I'm there the manager asks me what I'm in the mood for because he picks the wine and as you said builds the entire meal based on the wine. Its a wonderful experience. My wife doesn't drink much at all but whenever we frequent that restaurant she has a glass or two with her meal because it all goes so well together.

Chefbear, you definitely know what you're talking about. Kudos!

Dan
 
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