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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been keeping aquaria for close to 50 years and this is the first time I have seen this particular problem. My 150 gal planted Asian tank is infested with this black velvety algae. It grows on the driftwood, the walls and worst of all, the plants themselves. It is very unsightly. The plants don't like it, the fish don't care.

I have tried different combinations of light bulbs with no discernible change. I do 33% water changes monthly, sometimes with gravel vacuuming. Tank water is crystal clear. Temp 77. pH 7.2. Two canister filters and a 1800 gph wave maker provide flow. Can someone offer a cure?

Here is a picture:

 

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very nice tank

if it was mine, id attack with peroxide and uv. it would work eventually, peroxide has quite a following now in both freshwater and in reef tanks, actual running reef tanks with thousands of dollars worth of sps corals I have the threads to show it...

sure its a total cheat and something natural exists that could probably work alternatively, I just couldnt wait lol
 

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You have a pretty serious black beard algae infestation. Do you inject co2? This stuff is a bugger to rid if tank parameters aren't adjusted and kept as such. I had it once, and dialing up my co2 and dosing excel for a week cleared it up.
 

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What is your lighting set-up? Photoperiod?
Current bulb programming:
1 Actinic and 1 pink plant 80w T5 bulbs 9am-9pm
2 6500k 80w T5 bulbs 9:30am-8:30pm
Blue moonlight LED 9pm-10pm

I have tried four 6500k bulbs as well. I like the colors of the fish with the actinic and plant bulbs in the mix.

You have a pretty serious black beard algae infestation. Do you inject co2? This stuff is a bugger to rid if tank parameters aren't adjusted and kept as such. I had it once, and dialing up my co2 and dosing excel for a week cleared it up.
I have a CO2 bottle and regulator. I am still confused about what needle valve and solenoid I need to hook it up (yes, I've read the stuff here). I will see if I can pick up a bottle of Flourish Excel today. That is the product you are referring to, correct?
 

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it is ok to either use or not use actinic spectrum lighting, 400ish nm not implicated in any special algae cases its more a product of import vs anything else. what we try to attain with algae free plants only occurs in asain streams or coldwater typically...warm water + pristine leaves I have never seen scuba diving in lakes lol

turning up the co2 can affect it by nutrient competition from the plants, but id opt for direct removal and concentrate all this on regrowth prevention. thats how we beat things in reef tanks. manual removal first, preventatives second.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
it is ok to either use or not use actinic spectrum lighting, 400ish nm not implicated in any special algae cases its more a product of import vs anything else. what we try to attain with algae free plants only occurs in asain streams or coldwater typically...warm water + pristine leaves I have never seen scuba diving in lakes lol

turning up the co2 can affect it by nutrient competition from the plants, but id opt for direct removal and concentrate all this on regrowth prevention. thats how we beat things in reef tanks. manual removal first, preventatives second.
I've tried removal, it doesn't scrape off very well. Not like Cyano and hair algae in my reef, those come off much easier than this stuff. Not to mention it would be tough on the plant leaves, even the Anubias. I'll try to get my CO2 going and see what happens.

Oh, I'm glad you don't think the Actinic lamp is a problem, my turquoise rainbows look so much better with them on!
 

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This stuff is a bear to remove! I had good luck with peroxide (use a syringe to spot shoot it). In my experience, it grows faster with Actinics and the moonlights if on all the time since the plants really don't utilize that spectrum at all. I haven't had anything eat it except for a Pelegrini pleco(L95) (which are not cheap, and they are ugly until they get large) The peroxide will almost immediately turn this stuff purple, and it will fizz until it basically melts away to nothing. Good luck...Some say flying fox will eat it but I'm not sure on that.

Adam
 

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yes I wasnt mentioning peroxide as a maybe, agreed its rather awesome. I know people want their all natural approach, but in the end, they usually come crawling in to one of the p threads out of desperation.

p was touted as inherently destructive for too long. if you ever want to see a massive scale application of it on hundreds of reef tanks since 2011 google this "pest algae challenge thread"

imagine how easy plants would be to fix if we apply this to delicate brain corals and every other coral in the system.

I referenced a thread active right now at TPT in my reefcentral thread on P. you guys do great fw work with it, skip over to the algae forum and see their peroxide work. between the two threads, you can see we beat BBA all the time with it. funny you mention the hallmark color change, this happens in marine settings when you treat rhodophyta species with p, they turn hallmark bright pink and thats the harbinger of doom for them while nontargets are preserved so well we can make a sixty pager out of it.

peroxide use is so controversial in marine systems (whereas you guys in fw know it has uses documented back to the 60s and before) Ive lost very long standing forum accounts over chemistry battles that ensued (in the end, the man with the cancel membership button wins lol)

its just an effective cheat. you imported that strain into your tank (marimo balls anyone) and it simply found a niche it could exploit with your varying parameters etc.

p is good to knock out biomass targets, while preserving biofilters.

I know of no fish intolerant of it, marine fish included. every fish Ive ever seen in a reef tank tolerated it well while we attacked X invader

it doesnt harm filter bacteria in the ways it used to be stated it would. we simply destroyed that notion in the challenge thread. constant ammonia testing feedback, across test kits, across reef tanks, even after over doses of a terrible proportion. your filter bacteria are nearly immune to peroxide use (in our tanks) this includes fw.

one would think peroxide just -has- to kill aerobic filter bacteria, or reducing ones for degassing nitrate out of reef systems, its not so. threads hold all the anecdote we need after 60 pages of decently solid predictions I might add :)

we talked about reasons its postulated that its not killing our beds.

you dose after -heavy- effort to clip your leaves you can stand to clip, thumb remove where you can stand to do it.

manual removal factors into removing the eutrophication we let explode off one single brushy area. its the cost of hesitation man.

after tank is as clean as it can be from your elbow grease and pruning and scraping off the glass with razors, work, you underwater spot inject the spots one at a time with your tank full using one of the myriad capture techniques outlined in that giant marine thread. (saran wrap, pill bottles etc)

sure its a crap ton of reading. you want your tank cleaned ? :) might be worth it man. RCS incidentally aren't on the list of sensitives, Ive actually put too much in my breeding tank before to no harm. genetic susceptibles like the lysmata shrimp are quickly evident. there is a contrasting line of tolerance we are discovering using constant feedback in active peroxide threads.

somewhere out there, an elusive mix exists that can naturally cure your tank of this invader in short time. I dont know what that combo is or I wouldnt have wasted 4 yrs on peroxide work lol
B
 
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