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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new 20G aio cube. I'm thinking of adding some emergent plants and I'm wondering which plants I can use besides Pothos? I think I read Monstera adansonii (Swiss Cheese Plant) will work, but I'd need to order that. Can I use a Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum)? What plants are others here using? I think a Spathiphyllum (Peace Lily) is probably too big for my space. Pictures for inspiration would also be a big help.

I have plastic media, ceramic media and layers of sponge in the center back chamber of my cube. Would it be effective to remove the sponge and have the plants grow from there or would it be better for both the tank and the plants to leave the sponges and place some plants directly into the main space?

I have a lot of rock inside the tank. The first chamber contains the heater (Hygger Mini Glass) and CO2 diffuser. The last spot is dedicated to the return pump (Sicce Syncra 1.5 turned as low as it will go).

Water temp is set at 77. I put in 4 Microdevario Kubotai and 2 dozen super red cherry shrimp over the weekend. I'll add more Kubotia and a pair of Apistograma Cacatuoides next week when they come out of quarantine. I'm trying to balance the temp needs of the Kubotai and Neocardia with the incoming Apistos...
 

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I am pretty sure you can do most any plants. I’ve seen Pothos, tomato plants, pepper plants. From what I understand most plants do fine with the bottom up their root structure being in the water. Look up and avoid plants like rosemary which have chemicals that can be hazardous.


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I am pretty sure you can do most any plants. I’ve seen Pothos, tomato plants, pepper plants. From what I understand most plants do fine with the bottom up their root structure being in the water. Look up and avoid plants like rosemary which have chemicals that can be hazardous.


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Many herbaceous plants develop temporary water roots in water, but don't thrive if the roots are permanently submerged. I can root tomato, pepper and herb plants easily in water, but have to transfer to soil to grow. A few exceptions are Pothos, Lucky Bamboo, Philadendron, among a few others you can permanently grow in water. I am rooting colorful coleus in water, but they are not happy and don't grow in water.
 

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Many herbaceous plants develop temporary water roots in water, but don't thrive if the roots are permanently submerged. I can root tomato, pepper and herb plants easily in water, but have to transfer to soil to grow. A few exceptions are Pothos, Lucky Bamboo, Philadendron, among a few others you can permanently grow in water. I am rooting colorful coleus in water, but they are not happy and don't grow in water.
Checkout Foo the Flowerhorn on YouTube. Grows a few plants long term in his aquarium. Cool to see


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Checkout Foo the Flowerhorn on YouTube. Grows a few plants long term in his aquarium. Cool to see


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Interesting set up. On closer look, he is not growing vegetable plants with fully submerged roots, but hydroponically in pots with partially submerged roots. With limited root aeration, the size of the lettus is stunt with browning leaves in the bottom.


This is different from plants such as pothos and lucky bamboo that thrive with fully submerged roots. My lucky bamboo is 3 year old and about reaching the ceiling. I’m experimenting with coleus, mint and basil. They survive but don’t thrive, so not all plants can grow submerged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone for suggestions. I'll keep looking around. I might just try to find some large emersed grown anubius... but I thought that maybe there would be some cheaper and easier houseplants to add. Our hobby is often a work in progress.
 

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any pothos is worth a try. I find that the lighter colored ones work the best in tanks. Could just be me though. But they are cheap, hell go to your mom's or friend's house and just as for a clipping with like 3 leaves on it and enough stem to reach the water and hang it some how. Roots will grow down pretty far if you let them. I used them as a part of the tank. One corner little fish would hang out in the roots that grew down like in a mangrove.

Water Pet supply Wood Organism Plant

This was my tank with a few I started. Since the tank is in a completely different spot now, but this is how I started them. I would say about 1/4 ended up dying slowly, while 3/4 of the pothos I tried flourished and grew many feet long. I just wrapped them around each other and the light until I/we figured out something to do with them.

This is just google images for what to look for.
Plant Flowerpot Houseplant Green Leaf

Also, if you do try anubias, I would try to trim off all the oldest leaves, maybe leave 2 or 3 of the newest. Most will likely fall off anyway, so might as well put plant energy towards new emmersed growth rather than saving leaves. Also a lot of plants sold for aquariums are often grown emmersed, if you find some someplace like this you should be ready to go right out the gate.
 

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Thanks everyone for suggestions. I'll keep looking around. I might just try to find some large emersed grown anubius... but I thought that maybe there would be some cheaper and easier houseplants to add. Our hobby is often a work in progress.
Unfortunately, emerged grown Anubius don’t make good houseplant. Mine keeps getting unsightly brown edges on emerged leaves despite lush submerged foliage. I guess low ambient humidity makes Anubius as well as many marsh plants bad houseplant. You are better off with Pothos which looks remarkably like Anubius anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Unfortunately, emerged grown Anubius don’t make good houseplant. Mine keeps getting unsightly brown edges on emerged leaves despite lush submerged foliage. I guess low ambient humidity makes Anubius as well as many marsh plants bad houseplant. You are better off with Pothos which looks remarkably like Anubius anyway.
I did try it once. I thought it was my particular plant, but I got the same results you report. I have pothos hanging. I'll have to snip some for the tank. I was just hoping to add something more. Thanks!
 
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