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I have a 40B that is basically empty of Fauna. Right now there are 3 Tiger Nerites and 5 Oto Cats in the tank and that's it. I've been thinking for weeks about what to put in the tank. My LFS just got some gorgeous Fire and Blue Gouramis. I was wondering if I could keep 10 or so of them in this tank without issues? Will both species play nice together? I know some Gouramis can be semi-aggressive and become a problem. I also know some of them get big and a 40B isn't sufficient. From what I can find both of those species appear to be dwarf Gouramis which stay smaller. Any info would be greatly appreciated. I've always loved Gouramis but have never kept any.
 

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Keeping gouramis can be problematic due to their aggressive natures. The common advice is to either just keep one, or keep a large group so their aggression is dispersed and not directed against a single individual.

Some gouramis are less aggressive than others. My experience with dwarf gouramis, blue gouramis, gold goramis and their close relatives is that they can be pretty aggressive towards each other. On the other hand, my lace gouramis get along nicely with each other. Also golden honey gouramis and sunset honey gouramis are pretty mild mannered.

Others may have differing experiences of course.

Good luck.

Julia
 

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I have a powder blue and a red dwarf gourami in my 25 gallon. The red one is more dominant, but they coexist just fine. Many types of fish establish a pecking order and as long as it does not become brutal or constant harassment, that is ok. The red one only bullies when he is bored it seems, when there is food in the tank they eat fin and fin...lol.
 

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I had to get rid of my blue Opaline gourami as he picked on my larger pearl gourami non stop. My two pearls get along fine. Blues/golds are both the same species but different variants and aggressive. Pearls are mellow and very beautiful once they fully develop their colors. I don't have any experience with the dwarfs. I also have noticed individual gouramis are individuals and some act better than others of the same species.

I had a pearl and a gold together in the past without any issues. I don't remember the gender as that can also be a factor.
 

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It didn't matter how well my pearl hid in the thickest of my plants, the opaline would search everywhere until he found him and then proceeded to literally drill him into the gravel repeatedly. Didn't matter how well fed they were either or how many other fish were in the tank.
 

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BTW they are the same species just different bred coloration.
Yes. To clarify:

Opaline, blue, 3-spot, gold, lavender = all the same species and all aggressive. Do not keep with other types and keep either one or 5+.

Dwarf gouramis are as aggressive as those listed above and the same advice holds.

Pearl gouramis and moonlight gouramis are more peaceful. I haven't kept moonlights, but my pearls do find with a betta and the small, shy honey gouramis.

Honey gouramis (both golden and sunset) are shy and peaceful and can be kept in groups. (They have very small mouths however, so be sure you're feeding them something they can eat.)

I hope this helps. As others have said, these guys are individuals though, and may behave differently than what I have experienced.

Julia
 

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I've had a couple dwarf gouramis and they weren't so nice to each other and others if I remember right.

I have a golden gourami now and he's the best fish in the tank! My tetras and rainbows are not so nice to each other. lol

Love the pic or your goldens!

Oh and keep us posted as to how they get along. Hope all goes well.
 

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One or More Blue Gouramis Works

I have two Blue Gouramis in a 45 gallon tank with a lot of other fish and they bicker a bit but nothing serious. The keys are 1) Have lots of cover, plants, rocks, driftwood, etc; and 2) Get females! Females have a shorter, rounded dorsal fin and a rounder belly than males (no she does not have roe on board). Males have a longer dorsal fin that comes to a point, and no notable belly bulge. Females are less aggressive than males and so when there is a territorial dispute, it is less impacting. Blue gouramis are more docile than dwarfs or gold gouramis, or pearl gouramis. That's why I went with blues. There will always be one dominant fish and one passive if you put two in a tank together. The larger, dominant female will establish her territory and chase the smaller one out sometimes, but not always. Sometimes they even hang out together in nuetral water. But when the dominant one chases the passive one out of her territory, that's it - She leaves her alone. It's nothing serious and it works as long has there is enough cover. The dominant one takes 2/3 of the tank and leaves 1/3 to the passive blue gourami.

Other fish matter too. Here is what I have in the tank:
5 black neon tetras
3 serpae tetras
3 black skirt tetras
4 white skirt tetras
2 FEMALE blue gouramis
1 male beta
1 pictus catfish
1 clown loach
3 green cory catfish
1 bala shark
1 marble angelfish

Some would argue it is too crowded, but not if there is enough cover for everyone. I'm only violating the "inch of fish per gallon" rule by about 7 inches. The only other conflict I have is a territory dispute between the serpae tetras and the beta fish, but it too is not serious.

Bottom line - You can have more than one blue gourami in a tank if:
1) The tank is large enough
2) There is enough cover
3) They are females!
 

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I have two Blue Gouramis in a 45 gallon tank with a lot of other fish and they bicker a bit but nothing serious. The keys are 1) Have lots of cover, plants, rocks, driftwood, etc; and 2) Get females! Females have a shorter, rounded dorsal fin and a rounder belly than males (no she does not have roe on board). Males have a longer dorsal fin that comes to a point, and no notable belly bulge. Females are less aggressive than males and so when there is a territorial dispute, it is less impacting. Blue gouramis are more docile than dwarfs or gold gouramis, or pearl gouramis. That's why I went with blues. There will always be one dominant fish and one passive if you put two in a tank together. The larger, dominant female will establish her territory and chase the smaller one out sometimes, but not always. Sometimes they even hang out together in nuetral water. But when the dominant one chases the passive one out of her territory, that's it - She leaves her alone. It's nothing serious and it works as long has there is enough cover. The dominant one takes 2/3 of the tank and leaves 1/3 to the passive blue gourami.

Other fish matter too. Here is what I have in the tank:
5 black neon tetras
3 serpae tetras
3 black skirt tetras
4 white skirt tetras
2 FEMALE blue gouramis
1 male beta
1 pictus catfish
1 clown loach
3 green cory catfish
1 bala shark
1 marble angelfish

Some would argue it is too crowded, but not if there is enough cover for everyone. I'm only violating the "inch of fish per gallon" rule by about 7 inches. The only other conflict I have is a territory dispute between the serpae tetras and the beta fish, but it too is not serious.

Bottom line - You can have more than one blue gourami in a tank if:
1) The tank is large enough
2) There is enough cover
3) They are females!
Do you have a 150 gallon tank to transfer the Bala Shark to when it reaches maturity? The Clown Loach can get by with a 100 gallon.
 
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