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Hi! I have started a new planted tank that I am going to try and keep plankton (daphnia, copepods, hydra, etc...) in, in a long-term effort to provide live food for some fish.

I have already put a lot of thought and effort into keeping these critters alive, by providing ample separated hiding places, and giving them food to eat.

I was hoping to collect them at my local pond, maybe a few months prior to getting fish, to let them populate the tank first. And obviously, if there are fish in that pond, there is a risk that they may carry some diseases.

BUT!!! If I do this, could I start out with a few fish, and if they live for a few months, I can assume any harmful diseases would have attacked these first fishes I introduced, and I can now begin to introduce other fish?

Any experience adding water from a pond to your tank? What were the results?

THANKS!

Bump: What I mean, is can I add the water directly to the tank, or would there be any real way of quarantining such tiny invertebrates?
 

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I can't help with your questions but you should check with your state gaming and fishing regulations to make sure you can even legally take the water from a public pond/lake/river. A lot (if not all) states ban the transportation of the water itself to limit the transportation of the organisms in it that may potentially be transferred to another water sorce (usually when people are collecting baitfish). Just like we dont release live plants and fish into local water ways, we don't deposit water from another body of water into another. I know you are only using it for personal aquarium use but good luck explaining that your local DNR. Just letting you know that if DNR sees you collecting public water, you will more than likely be questioned and/or fined. It's always good to check local and state laws when collecting nature.
 

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Why not just acclimate the inverts, net them out of the pond water, and put them in the tank?
You don't want hydras, they stick to the walls and aren't edible. Also, they sting, and they'll eat fry and any of the buggies you try to grow.
 

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Moving Pond Water

Hello Jake...

The chances of keeping organisms alive from the pond to a tank is remote, because you can't duplicate the environment. To me, this isn't a project that will work.

B
 

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There are parasites like Camallanus worms that uses water bugs as carriers. You'd have to quarantine your water bugs for months to make sure the parasite dies off.

Or you can get tank raised water bugs from other hobbyists. They're safe.

Bump:
Hello Jake...

The chances of keeping organisms alive from the pond to a tank is remote, because you can't duplicate the environment. To me, this isn't a project that will work.

B
It's not that hard as long as you know what to feed them and don't introduce chlorine and other chemicals like excel/glut.
 

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What Fish Diseases Might be Present in Pond Water?

All of them!
 

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Using pond water is about ten steps further along on pushing the luck than pouring the water fish come in directly into your tank. When you get new fish it is always better to not pour the water into your tank, just on the thinking there might be something there. In a pond, there is an almost unlimited number of bad things you might regret having in the tank. Some may be in the small critters you collect but if your fish are in good shape, they have a good chance of fighting off anything of that nature. But feeding live food does come with some fair amount of risk involved.
 

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Thing is, any pathogens in the pond are things your fish aren't used to. Pond fish are at least partially immune to what they're swimming in, but your fish could be from halfway across the world. They aren't anywhere near immune to whatever's in your backyard.
You could culture pond buggies in a separate tank for a few months and use dechlorinated water for water changes. After a few months, most fish-attacking germs should have died off.
 
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