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What do you feed your fish?

2302 Views 24 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  NickAu
So I am gonna be a first time fish owner. I've had a planted tank for years, but never felt the need to have fish till now. I'm only gonna house two species; Otocinclus vittatus, and Brachydanio tinwini. The Otocinclus are not a worry. I've got algae cultivation on lockdown. I'm having trouble finding what I want to feed the tinwini. Most websites say live foods and a "good quality dried food." Well, what the heck does that mean? And what are some good dried foods. I plan to get a Grindal worm culture set up, and maybe some drosophila or Daphne too. But I want a good backup, some pellets, flake, or freeze dried combo. I just have no idea what to look for. Any direction would be helpful. I don't mind spending some money.
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With any fish, variety is key. For the danios I suggest New Life spectrum (small fish formula) or crushed flake food. Good quality fish foods will have shrimp or fish as there first ingredient. Another good thing to do is add frozen foods to their diet. I feed my danios and tetras frozen bloodworms or brineshrimp about twice a week. I hope this helps!
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I feed my fish New Life Spectrum Small Fish Formula 0.5mm.

Typical Ingredients: Whole Antarctic Krill, Whole Herring, Whole Wheat Flour, Algae, Beta Carotene, Spirulina, Garlic, Vegetable and Fruit Extract, Vitamin A Acetate, Vitamin D Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Folic Acid, Niacin, Biotin, Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (Stable C), Ethylenediamine Dihydroiodide, Cobalt Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Choline Chloride.
My otos love a little slice of zucchini every now and then. As for the the dry food. New life spectrum S is ok, it floats a little too much for my liking goes straight to the over flows. I really been happy with borneo wilds Staple S but it's hard to find. Not sure if they still make it. Looks like they mostly concentrate on shrimp stuff. My fish have all loved it. Right now only fish I have are some chili rasbora.
Another vote for NLS small fish formula (0.5mm). Get it in the Thera A+ (extra garlic) or Finicky Fish version if you can find it in that size pellet.
Haven't kept the Tinwini's myself, but I've considered them in the past and vids show them to be just as fast eaters as other danios, so I don't think the dry food would be a problem.
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fish / soy / wheat germ / seaweed, flour, yeast, vitamin A / C / D / E / K, biotin, garlic, probiotics, zeaxanthin, spirulina

thread here on it http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/146-southern-oak-aquatics/157708-borneowild-fish-food.html
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With the good brands, they don't need variety. Does not mean they don't enjoy it.
I feed Tetramin flakes (even newly caught wild fish eats it) as well as crisps, Dophin no9, Tetra prima, BBS, A local brand baby powder, cucumbers, bloodworms, daphnia, deformed baby fish, First bites, 2 types of tablets and the list probably goes on for a while. (oh yeah I have more fish than my LFS)

Live food is also the best companion to any form of treatment a fish may need.
,
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Awesome​! Thank you all for the information. I just bought a small container of NLS 0.5mm. opted to not go the thera+ route, as it just as extra garlic, where the other still contains it. Could not find anyone who sold borneowild staple.
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I feed an alternating variety: Omega one veggie wafers and crushed up veggie pellets, NLS garlic therapy A pellets, crushed for some tanks. Hikari micro wafers. And frozen bloodworms, daphnia, and mysys shrimp.

I also supplement plecos and Otos with blanched veggies and just ordered Repashy Soylent Green and Super Green.

I crush food for my nanos in a pill grinder from the dollar store.
I have fed nothing but NLS for years. My fish have never been better.
Some fish get fed weird things like sweets or cranberries and eventually will eat nothing else.
Ken's Fish Food is what I've fed my fish from the beginning and have had nothing but success. My rainbows starting eating flakes hours after placing them in the tank and all the fish I've had in the past enjoy it. Half a pound, about a gallon of flakes, is like $10.
frozen blood worms.

$6 that will last me 6+ months
I feed my betta some plecocaine, frozen blood worms, and frozen brine shrimp, and some frozen veggies. I get the variety pack at Petco, the plecocaine from a guy named John Patakos, who is really good about getting your order to you within a week.
and some frozen veggies.
Bettas are insectivores and should NOT be fed vegetable matter they cant process it in their gut.

This includes feeding peas to Bettas that are bloated.
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Ya know' I thought this thread was another one of those threads that just is asking for click bait, but @NickAu turned it into education. Good job nick your making the world a better place
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and some frozen veggies.
Bettas are insectivores and should NOT be fed vegetable matter they cant process it in their gut.

This includes feeding peas to Bettas that are bloated.
Okay, then how do you cure a betta from swim bladder disorder then?

I have never had any issue with swim bladder disorder or bloat with any betta that I have owned.

You should always feed a variety to any fish you have, because without that variety, they can get malnourished. You wouldn't want to just eat one type of food, would you?

To treat swim bladder disorder, you do feed peas, deshelled peas, to bettas. Peas are a laxative for fish and can cure swim bladder disorder.
would you?
he said peas, and you said you feed like 4 different types of food.... (plecocaine, frozen blood worms, and frozen brine shrimp)
and to ensure health yes I would. Its not just a matter of variety, its a matter of correct nutrients for fish.


Mosquito larva. This my friend is the real true betta food. Bettas eat tones of them in the rice paddies of Thailand, so it is a great choice of food. One slight tiny problem though: finding the damn things. I don’t have mosquito larva where I live (but I guess Florida resident might have better luck) (did I just say “luck” ???). I hate mosquitoes, so I don’t mind not finding their larvas floating about in my water. In short, unless you have them pesky little insects around, you won’t be able to get larva to your bettas. Be careful also to not harvest from dirty water (where bacteria might be flourishing) so you don’t bring a diseases back into your tank.
Live brine shrimp. If you have a lot of money, go for it. You can buy them at your local fish store, and your bettas will love you like, forever. To use as a treat only and as I said earlier, in moderation.
Live worms. (I strongly advise against using this type of food). Brown worms, blood worms, any worms your fish store will sell you, any cultures that will produce live worms, in short bettas LOVE worms. And in this case, you should be able to easily find live worms at your local fish store. I do NOT recommend picking worms from gardens, etc.. As they may have been subjected to pesticides etc… When you feed live worms to your betta, FIRST CLEAN THE WORMS THOROUGHLY. Worms can carry tones of bacteria and parasites. I used to feed live brown worms to my bettas, and brown worms are especially yucky. Although my bettas loved eating them, I soon developed a heavy love/hate relation with the wormies: Invariably, after feeding live food for a period of time, a bacterial outbreak would sweep through my fishroom and the rate of dropsy would climb. No live food, almost never any dropsy. So I finally decided to give them up completely :((. If you like playing with fire, you can feed live worms. To wash live worms, dump them into a brine shrimp net and let COLD water run on them, rinsing them, for a good one minute. Brown worms need to be stored in a container, with only enough water to cover their bodies (no more) and placed in your refrigerator. You should open the container daily and rinse the worms, whether you intend to use them or not. If you cannot do all the above, then don’t bother with live brown worms, because they will be so unsanitary they will IMMEDIATELY give your fish diseases. Instead go for “once live but now dead” food (see below). Do not feed only live worms to your bettas, it is too rich and needs to be balanced with other foods. This is however a great food to condition your bettas for breeding. Too bad it is so contaminated... (sigh...). You might have luck with cultures that you can grow yourself, hence keeping them clean and free of bacteria. I have had the BEST of luck with my microworms cultures, but only the small fry under 40 days of age will eat them :(((. Larger worms are hard to produce in large enough quantities and usually demands a larger set-up (eats lots of space) and some also smell horrible (on a BIG scale!).
Frozen live food. This is one of the “once live but now dead” food that bettas will eat. It is more expensive, but cleaner and less yucky to manipulate then live food. Freeze it and it will keep for a long time (unlike live food). Unfreeze small portion and feed them to your bettas. One warning though, I believe there is a correlation between frozen foods and parasites, especially ich. Therefore, if you are feeding frozen food, remember to add AQUARISOL to your water to prevent ich. Also if anyone tells you that freezing the worms kills all the germs, you have my permission to slap them around a little bit, maybe it will bring them back to their senses, and to reality. LOL. Although all bacteria is not killed by the freezing process, it does get rid of most, making frozen food my favorite betta food and now a day the only food I allow in my fishroom.
Freeze dried live food. This is another one of the “once live but now dead” food that bettas will eat. I highly recommend it, because unlike the above live foods, it is sterile and will not bring any diseases or parasites into your tanks. You will mainly find two types: Freeze dried bloodworms and freeze dried brine shrimp. Bettas are especially fund of the later, while they sometimes eat the first reluctantly. I feed both to my babies. If you have many bettas, you might consider buying freeze dried food in bulk, it is otherwise pretty expensive. If you are prone to allergies, experiment with this food, I have found that myself and other breeders have a reaction to it (sneezing, temporary asthma, etc…). I use it anyways (aaAAAAA tchA!) Be careful to not feed any freeze dried food that is hard (over cooked if I may say) it will cause internal damage to your bettas. Any little hard piece should be tossed pronto.
Betta bites (and other betta pellets). There are a few different brands of betta food out there, food that were specifically designed for bettas. Most breeders don’t bother with them, because they are expensive and too generic. We prefer to have more control over the protein intake of our fish. But if you are just keeping a few bettas as pets, this is not a bad option, as long as you alternate with something else every now and then. Betta pellets are easy, just throw a few in your jar and you are done :). Bettas might not want to eat pellets if they have had a chance to taste yummy foods such as brine shrimp ;) though!!
credit to betta food
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Okay, then how do you cure a betta from swim bladder disorder then?
Peas will not cure SBD,

Keep the water super clean and warm
Fast the fish for three days. No food at all.
Encourage the betta to flare by placing another betta's tank nearby, or showing the betta a mirror. Bettas often poo when they flare.
Daphnia is a great laxative.
Epsom salt baths, DO NOT use aquarium salt.
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