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22 gallon long tank that has been setup for about 6 weeks. Have had a ton of growth lately but the past 3 days my staurogyne repens have been losing leaves and the other leaves are starting to turn pale and then fall off. My rotala and ludwigia have been having this problem to a much smaller extent just some leaves falling off the bottom maybe reabsorbing? My water parameters are as follows: ammonia 0, nitrites 0, nitrates 0ish, ph 6.5ish with co2 on. Following seachems weekly dosing calendar https://www.seachem.com/downloads/charts/Plant-Dose-Chart.pdf One thing that has changed recently is that I turned the lights up from 5 hours to 8 hours. Could that have caused this, I didn't turn my co2 up after adding more light. My only other idea is that my nitrates are always 0 (my tank is heavily planted) Or maybe an iron deficiency? Any feedback on seachems chart above? Should I be adding more of something? Let me know any feedback or what you might think is wrong. Thanks!
 

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Hi @hiroshero,

Welcome to TPT!

At first glance it looked like a calcium (Ca) deficiency due to the hooking downward leaf tips of the Ludwigia however I don't think that is it. It looks more like a potassium (K) deficiency since it seems to be affecting the recently matured leaves of the Staurogyne. I see chlorosis (yellowing) followed by necrosis (dead areas) occurring.

Remember, a tank is all about 'balance'. When we increase the amount of light (duration, intensity, or both) then we need to increase the available nutrients (both nutrient fertilizers and CO2 in some cases). When you increased the light by 60% (5 hr to 8 hr) the nutrients needed to be increased as well. If it were me I would drop the photoperiod down to 6.5 hours and increase your nutrient dosing by 50%. Maintain those levels for two weeks and watch your new leaves as they emerge (the existing leaves will changevery little and may continue decline due to damage already done). Do the new leaves look healthier, greener, maybe even a little larger? Then you are on the right path.

If you have an opportunity I suggest getting a KH/GH hardness test kit and check your dKH and dGH in your tank.

Leaf chlorosis is not the dominant symptom. Symptoms appear on older leaves at base of plant.

2. Necrotic spots develop on older leaves

a. Margins of older leaves become chlorotic and then burn, or small chlorotic spots progressing to necrosis appear scattered on old leaf blades. Calcium excess impedes uptake of potassium cations.... potassium deficiency

Potassium deficiency symptoms first appear on the recently matured leaves of the plant (not on the young, immature leaves at the growing point). In some plants, the first sign of potassium deficiency is a white specking or freckling of the leaf blades. With time, the symptoms become more pronounced on the older leaves , and they become mottled or yellowish between the veins and scorched at the margins. These progress inward until the entire leaf blade is scorched. If sodium cations are present and taken up in place of K+1, leaf flecking (necrotic spots scattered on leaf surface) and reduced growth occur. Potassium is phloem re-translocated from old leaves to new growth.
 

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You need to test the levels of Fe, PO4, NO3, K, Mg and CO2. This looks like Fe or Mg deficiency but you have 0 NO3 and probably 0 PO4. You should increase the levels the micro and macro elements to the recommended levels if you have heavily planted tank. If your tap water is hard, you don't have to worry about Ca deficiency. Maybe the plants had already eaten the most nutrients from the substrate for these 6 months and that's why the issues started. I suggest you to test the main micro and macro elements levels then to check what do you put in the tank with the seachem nutrient calendar and adjust slowly the amount of the caps/milliliters accordingly.
 

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Hi @hiroshero,

Welcome to TPT!

At first glance it looked like a calcium (Ca) deficiency due to the hooking downward leaf tips of the Ludwigia however I don't think that is it. It looks more like a potassium (K) deficiency since it seems to be affecting the recently matured leaves of the Staurogyne. I see chlorosis (yellowing) followed by necrosis (dead areas) occurring.

Remember, a tank is all about 'balance'. When we increase the amount of light (duration, intensity, or both) then we need to increase the available nutrients (both nutrient fertilizers and CO2 in some cases). When you increased the light by 60% (5 hr to 8 hr) the nutrients needed to be increased as well. If it were me I would drop the photoperiod down to 6.5 hours and increase your nutrient dosing by 50%. Maintain those levels for two weeks and watch your new leaves as they emerge (the existing leaves will changevery little and may continue decline due to damage already done). Do the new leaves look healthier, greener, maybe even a little larger? Then you are on the right path.

If you have an opportunity I suggest getting a KH/GH hardness test kit and check your dKH and dGH in your tank.
Agree with him.. but if u don't wanna test ur water for the levels of various elements just add the ferts and look at how things change. As of now.. u definitely need to add macros and iron and turn up the co2. Then wait for the plants to show if there s a limiting nutrient or factor.

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