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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm around 9 months into the hobby and sick of the water changes, so I think it might be good to sell off the fish I currently have and get something else that will require less water changes, even when fully grown, and I'm hoping that you all can help me figure out what I could possibly get, other than shrimp or crabs...

29 gallon tall tank, probably has around 25 gallons (due to water displacement), seems to need around 8 gallons per week, trying to keep nitrates between 5 and 10 ppm, with 2 adult Blue Gourami. Ultimately, I'd like to get it so it only needs 5 gallons every two weeks. What could I possibly replace the fish with?

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/yourtanks.php?do=view&id=15465



20 gallon tall, probably has around 17 gallons (due to water displacement), and will definitely not be able to keep the two Pinoy Angelfish in there for too long. I'm hoping it too could end up with something that will only require 5 gallons every two weeks.

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/yourtanks.php?do=view&id=15481


Thanks for the suggestions!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you have live plants?
Yes, see link. You are able to see my profiles in the links, right? But yeah, I do suspect that they'll eventually help out more, but still, I don't think they'll be able to do enough. I suppose I could let the moss take over half the tank, that might do it, but I was hoping to avoid that (half the tank being moss). ?
 

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Gotcha, are your tanks completely cycled? Biological filtration will be the power pouch behind reducing ammonia, and nitrite. So, if the bacteria isn't properly established you will get spikes in both. Are you seeing high levels of either? Also, many hobbyists don't like them, but floating plants really tend to help reduce excess nutrients directly out of your water column. Personally I do 10 to 20 percent water changes every 2 weeks and I run external canister filters with mostly biological filtration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No problems with ammonia or nitrite, as the gravel bed is quite thick. I'm just sick of having to do weekly water changes (from nitrates), and I don't want my biweekly water changes (as if I could go that far before risking going into the red) to be so big. I was thinking about putting in some lesser duckwheat or riccia fluitans. Would be easier to scoop excess out instead of having to do a water change.
 

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I was worried your filtration isn't enough. (Just a bubbler or under gravel filter?) But I'm also curious what signs your getting that you need water changes. do you test your water? No tank is the same and everyone has different water change needs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah. buck up a Lil more filtration, and floaters. It will help you in the long run. Good news though! Your tanks sound and look healthy otherwise!
Good luck!

Thanks, although, I can't imagine that a filter would reduce nitrates. I think it would take anarobic bacteria to turn nitrate back into a gas, and I doubt that bacteria would do well in a filter, maybe at the bottom of the gravel bed, if there's clay, or something, but a filter, I doubt it, then again, I wouldn't really know.
 

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I don't feel like people are understanding the question... more filtration would not reduce nitrates.
If you want to replace the fish, simply get something that stays small. Lower bioload = slower accumulation of nitrates. And enough plants in there, and they won't accumulate at all. It's hard to recommend a fish though, as there are so many options...
A couple dwarf puffers, Badis badis, Dario dario, or peacock gudgeons are a few with personalities that come to mind. Or maybe a small school of regular, blue, green, yellow, or black neon tetras, or some other small schooling fish if that's what you might prefer.
 

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Any small size schooling fish will reduce the bioload. Neons etc. really don't get that big.

With the many small schooling fish you can add in shrimp and some nerite snails. This will keep things interesting but not add in a significant bioload.

With enough plants and a low enogh bioload few water changes are needed.
 

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Any small size schooling fish will reduce the bioload. Neons etc. really don't get that big.

With the many small schooling fish you can add in shrimp and some nerite snails. This will keep things interesting but not add in a significant bioload.

With enough plants and a low enogh bioload few water changes are needed.
This.

Also- are you doing EI dosing on this tank? EI dosing requires the weekly water changes to keep the fert levels in check. You might try lowering your nitrogen dosing, see where that gets you.
 
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