The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
673 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my Bolivian rams made their second attempt at breeding. It's a well stocked community tank and I had no plans on breeding them, so expectations were pretty low. The fry became free swimming this past Saturday and there were at least 100 of them which was a big improvement from the first time as only around 30 made it to free swimming.

At first both the male and female were protecting them and everything seemed to go well. The made it through Wednesday morning with no noticeable fry loss. I cam home on Thurdsday night and all of the sudden around half the fry were gone and the female was pissed at the male. I have a stone in the middle of the tank that acts sort as an aggression divider and if the male went past the stone on the same side of the tank as the female she would abandon the fry and go after him. I knew at this point the fry were goners as with the rest of the stock it really is too much for one fish to protect. By the morning the fry were gone.

Not really concerned about the fry as I wasn't expecting many if any to make it, but I am more curious about why the female got so aggressive with the male all of the sudden. They were working together for the first few days and then all of the sudden she snapped. Now that the fry are gone they are back to normal and swimming around the tank together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,032 Posts
Some fish take a few spawns before they get it right, but often if they are spooked, things go badly.
Best advice if you want to breed, have the tank in a quiet place that is not easily disturbed. Maybe even go as far as wrapping the side glass with a towel or blanket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,428 Posts
I look to nature to help explain some of the things we see in our tanks. In clear lakes you can often see the bass and perch spawning near the shore and observe what happens. Takes time but fun!
One thing that is clear is that there is often a pre-set order for things like fry leaving the nest. In a lake, the pair will often be busy keeping other fish back but if there are few other fish, the fry will grow to a certain point and then many attempt to leave the nest area without the female catching them to put them back. The "herd" gradually disappear. Some are caught and eaten by other fish but the quicker/smarter make it to cover and hide. But if the pair has chosen a poor site where there is little cover, the fry can't slip away and may stay too long. At some point the adults begin to see them as food and eat them. This happens along my concrete launching ramp at times. A nice clean/clear spot for a nest but not good cover when the fry need to leave. Older and more experienced fish choose better nest sites.
Human parents do much the same only we don't eat the children!

Given a bit of time and practice, the fish will be better each time so you may want to do some minor changes to the tank to help save some of the fry is you want. Notice where they tend to nest and add cover like hornwort, etc. nearby? Stacked rocks that lay pretty flat against each other so the fry can slide in between and be far enough in to not get sucked out?
Part of the fun I find in raising cichlids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
673 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not worried about the fry surviving. It would be cool, but I didn't get the rams to breed them, but rather because I liked them. They just happen to want to breed. I'm more curious as to why the female suddenly got so aggressive with the male. They were working together to protect the fry for days and then all of the sudden she would attack the male on sight. Seems odd. The first time they bred she was like that the entire time, so I figured that dad just wanted a snack, but after seem them working together I don't see why she would get like that.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top