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I have 10 blue dream neos in a 10 gallon tank. I have been changing 1 gallon of water a week with RO\DI remineralized to 175TDS

I have had this tank setup since July, and I'm a little worried that I haven't had any babies yet.

Should I continue to change 1 gallon weekly, or should I test TDS to decide? right now it's been about a week since I changed water and it's at 213 TDS.
 

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I do 50% water change every 2 weeks. This coincides roughly with their moulting cycle. I see a lot of molts after the water change.

In a shrimp only tank the TDS does not change much. Mine is always at 200 around for the tank that houses the neos.


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It’s only the shrimp in the tank, I’m feeding Bacter ae after water changes and mineral junkie once a week. I just started feeding blanched cucumbers once a week as well and ordered son kens fish veggie sticks.

I’m trying to keep the temp at 72.

I’ll do my parameter tests tomorrow and post here.

Thinking about it now, when I first set this tank up I was losing some water to evaporation and adding it back during my weekly water change instead of topping up with RO water, so I probably slowly raised the TDS over time. Should I keep changing with new water at a TDS of 175 or go to 200 to try to match the tank at 213?
 

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Set it for 215 for this water change. And then gradually pull back to 200. Imo this is the ideal TDS for neos. Kh of 4 and Gh of 6-8.

Also during water changes I always use a slow drip for incoming water. Temperature is more important to be matched than the TDS.


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Does topping off with RO water create the possibility that the ratio of solids in the TDS may change over time (i.e. different ratios for gH, kH, and other particulates) and drift from the nominal mineralized profile? Even though it stays the same TDS.

I've thought about topping off like that but worried about this issue.
 

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There's certainly a change in ratios over time, but this would occur even if we could eliminate evaporation altogether. I only top off with (non-mineralized) RO/DI because in my view that's all that is leaving the aquarium water.
 

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Okay, so I would say it's fine keep using the lower TDS water for water changes, you could potentially even use lower TDS water if the GH is climbing like the TDS.


I would also recommend adding in a protein food once a week. A fish or bug based meal. This could be either shrimp food or fish food. It can be frozen food or flake or pellet food. You can see if you can add to your Ken's Fish order if it hasn't shipped out yet or pick up something from a local pet store.


That would be the main change I can recommend at this time... and to give it at least a few weeks of the new diet.
 

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trying to keep the temp at 72.
I've read that if you raise the temps up to 80 or so that it will simulate summer breeding time and that will inspire some breeding.

I keep my tank steady at 78, put 6 blue dreams in my 10g four weeks ago, had a berried female within days and the shrimplets all hatched a couple of days ago.
I don't monitor much of anything else. I just do a 20% or so water change every week with RO water adjusted to Gh of around 7-9 and over the course of the week ad fertilizer to the water column (flourish, flourish trace, potassium and phosphorus as directed by SeaChem.) although I've cut my water column fert regimen in half doses since the little critters were hatched for no real scientific reason other to keep things more stable as the little ones grow.

I have at least 20 little ones in my tank right now.
 

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I have 10 blue dream neos in a 10 gallon tank. I have been changing 1 gallon of water a week with RO\DI remineralized to 175TDS

I have had this tank setup since July, and I'm a little worried that I haven't had any babies yet.

Should I continue to change 1 gallon weekly, or should I test TDS to decide? right now it's been about a week since I changed water and it's at 213 TDS.
Sounds like you are doing everything you need to do. My CRS seem to only breed in the Spring. I also have a 10 G (heavily planted + rocks and wood). Do you “drip” in the change water? Are you having deaths? Your TDS is fine. I think you just need to be patient. I’m wondering if this is the norm for a Nano (10 G) tank. A much larger tank and set up would probably yield a larger result. Keep us posted and be patient. I started with a dozen and now have 60.....in about 3 years. Good luck. Think you are fine.

Bump: I forgot to suggest doing the water change every other week instead of weekly.
 

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These animals come from temperate China, and do better at 60 than 80. I cannot stress enough to keep them cool as long as we aren't talking Sulawesi shrimp. And 10% weekly is what I do on my own tanks. If I knew a better percentage, I'd being doing that.
Your information seems to go against what most literature says. I've been using this guide for the care and breeding of my blue dreams and have had pretty good success.
https://aquariumbreeder.com/blue-velvet-shrimp-detailed-guide-care-diet-and-breeding/
 

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Blue dream are just another colour of neo, right? Not saying that water parameters aren't important, but neo's seem to be adaptable to most conditions and someone somewhere will be successfully keeping / breeding them in water that isn't within the normal recommendations. Most online literature can arguably be quite dated in terms of water parameters; breeding has come a long way in the past few years and my understanding is that today's shrimp are much less fussy than even a few generations back.

My current feeling and experience is that absolute water parameters aren't that important for neo's so long as they are within the right sort of range. I think (again from experience) that we can get far too caught up in chasing some arbitrary "optimum" parameters, and can actually be doing more harm than good by keep fiddling. I think other factors such as tank stability (fewer, smaller water changes), tank maturity (lots of biofilm), the right plants (I'm a big fan of moss for shrimp tanks) and diet have a much bigger impact upon shrimp health and willingness to breed than having a certain water parameter.

My red cherries just wouldn't breed - most people would say that's almost impossible given that my tank parameters were "perfect". I neglected the tank for a few weeks whilst setting up other tanks, TDS went up, KH went through the roof as soil's buffering suddenly ran out, glass got a bit green, moss became overgrown, salvinia covered surface, tank no longer looked pristine, and guess water happened!
 

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Your information seems to go against what most literature says. I've been using this guide for the care and breeding of my blue dreams and have had pretty good success.
https://aquariumbreeder.com/blue-velvet-shrimp-detailed-guide-care-diet-and-breeding/
I don't really consider care sheets literature, as anyone can write and post one online. I feel like someone wrote a care sheet on Neocaridina shrimp many years ago and everyone going forward just used the information off of that. Dennerle Breeders n' Keepers Wild Shrimp China edition was a turning point for me unplugging heaters. They collected them in the wild in many locations on trips at different times of year and recorded the water parameters. They were found in a variety of hardness and TDS/conductivity levels, but the one thing that stood out to me was that every collection point maxed out around 70 degrees. This is not say that populations aren't out there at warmer locations, but none were recorded. Neos overwinter in my outdoor pond that reaches near-freezing. They begin to perish at around 90 degrees. There are a lot of things I change my opinion on in this hobby, but too cool being better than too warm for Neo shrimp is not going to be one of them.



Cherry shrimp are crazy adaptable creatures. If things are stable they will thrive and breed way outside of care sheet recommendations. I keep them in Caridina tanks at 0 dKH and have kept them on crushed coral. What they do not suffer well is abrupt changes. This is why husbandry methods such as aging tanks and not overfeeding are so crucial. Your shrimp will do fine at 78. Being ectotherms it would be surmised that they will grow faster, breed more often and have a reduced lifespan than if kept at 70, which is a trade-off lots of people would make (and it isn't as if these differences are stark at change of 8 degrees).
 

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I don't really consider care sheets literature, as anyone can write and post one online. I feel like someone wrote a care sheet on Neocaridina shrimp many years ago and everyone going forward just used the information off of that. Dennerle Breeders n' Keepers Wild Shrimp China edition was a turning point for me unplugging heaters. They collected them in the wild in many locations on trips at different times of year and recorded the water parameters. They were found in a variety of hardness and TDS/conductivity levels, but the one thing that stood out to me was that every collection point maxed out around 70 degrees. This is not say that populations aren't out there at warmer locations, but none were recorded. Neos overwinter in my outdoor pond that reaches near-freezing. They begin to perish at around 90 degrees. There are a lot of things I change my opinion on in this hobby, but too cool being better than too warm for Neo shrimp is not going to be one of them.



Cherry shrimp are crazy adaptable creatures. If things are stable they will thrive and breed way outside of care sheet recommendations. I keep them in Caridina tanks at 0 dKH and have kept them on crushed coral. What they do not suffer well is abrupt changes. This is why husbandry methods such as aging tanks and not overfeeding are so crucial. Your shrimp will do fine at 78. Being ectotherms it would be surmised that they will grow faster, breed more often and have a reduced lifespan than if kept at 70, which is a trade-off lots of people would make (and it isn't as if these differences are stark at change of 8 degrees).
I agree with that about the literature not being so complete. I keep RCS in high 300+ PPM TDS water @~13dGH and ~5hKH which is too hard according to most of the literature. While I find dead ones occasionally they seem to do fine and get a very rich red coloration. My only failure is they do not seem to breed well in my environment. I had baby shrimp before but I don't get exploding colonies like others and rarely see berried females. I keep my tank around 75F so that might be it as I understand they like to breed at 80F.

I think that is how information in the hobby unfortunately propagates, there is a lot of copy and paste and not enough people question. For example one common myth is that "plants outcompete algae" if given ample CO2, light, and nutrients, i.e. healthy plants will take all the light and ferts and leave nothing for algae. But that cannot possibly be true as even in dense tanks there is plenty of room for algae to grow (glass, substrate, threads between plants ... ) and, especially in a rich dosing scheme there is plenty of nutrients in the water column at any given time for algae to grow. Clearly there is some OTHER principle(s) at work in a healthy aquarium that prevents algae growth. It might be cleanliness, or lack of damaged plants that become algae vectors, and/or that healthy plants can release their own chems to down regulate other plants and algae as speculated but nobody really knows for certain.
 

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. I keep my tank around 75F so that might be it as I understand they like to breed at 80F.
I keep my 4 home tanks unheated and the stay in the mid 60's most of the time and max out at about 70 and shrimp populations have grown steadily. 80F being needed to breed is simply not true. What the limiting factor might be however, would take a deeper dive than the information we have on hand.



This tank is in my unheated shop room and the heater is set to 70. I've sold over 100 Neos and even more CRS out of it in 2020.

 

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@ahem people are breeding Neos in 600+ TDS, I've even heard 800-1,000+ TDS, water measuring 16-20+ GH. Most people are breeding Neos in 74° F or lower temps...

When I was in a similar situation as yourself, where my shrimp population seemed "stagnant"... they were breeding, but not at a high enough rate for a population boom and *EVERYTHING* seemed "fine" in regards to parameters, tank, substrate, etc, etc etc.... and *NO ONE* could figure out why my shrimp weren't thriving... the best suggestion I received was to change the diet. A protein source once a week and a vegetable/algae source twice a week. That's it. Of course, this could be changed over time... but start there. Do that for several weeks and see if there are any changes.

I've had one or two people say later on they tried it and it worked. Others, I can only hope.


As for the parroting of information that's not true? Yes, that's annoying.... I can't really comment much about CO2, lighting and ferts... other than I've read and heard that fast growing plants may out-compete algae for food, add in split lighting (3-4 hours on, 2-4 hours off, 3-4 hours on, off for the rest of the time) and it makes it harder for algae to grow.... as it supposedly allows for the plants to uptake nutrients where-as algae is slower to uptake nutrients with the light on and off. --- Even with lights on 24/7, I struggle to grow algae. I don't have fast growing plants either.

But there's plenty of other stuff out there.... such as over-feeding results in various bugs. I've never had planaria or scuds in my aquariums and I've over-fed the tanks heavily! (I've had others of course!) Or how shrimp "do fine in tap water"... hate that one... it's the reason I got into shrimp keeping in the first place.... someone else's shrimp weren't doing well. In tap water. Or high pH equals hard water, low pH equals soft water.... also an annoyance. And the list goes on.
 

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I don't really consider care sheets literature, as anyone can write and post one online. I feel like someone wrote a care sheet on Neocaridina shrimp many years ago and everyone going forward just used the information off of that. Dennerle Breeders n' Keepers Wild Shrimp China edition was a turning point for me unplugging heaters. They collected them in the wild in many locations on trips at different times of year and recorded the water parameters. They were found in a variety of hardness and TDS/conductivity levels, but the one thing that stood out to me was that every collection point maxed out around 70 degrees. This is not say that populations aren't out there at warmer locations, but none were recorded. Neos overwinter in my outdoor pond that reaches near-freezing. They begin to perish at around 90 degrees. There are a lot of things I change my opinion on in this hobby, but too cool being better than too warm for Neo shrimp is not going to be one of them.



Cherry shrimp are crazy adaptable creatures. If things are stable they will thrive and breed way outside of care sheet recommendations. I keep them in Caridina tanks at 0 dKH and have kept them on crushed coral. What they do not suffer well is abrupt changes. This is why husbandry methods such as aging tanks and not overfeeding are so crucial. Your shrimp will do fine at 78. Being ectotherms it would be surmised that they will grow faster, breed more often and have a reduced lifespan than if kept at 70, which is a trade-off lots of people would make (and it isn't as if these differences are stark at change of 8 degrees).
Thanks for the thoughtful and thorough response. I appreciate your knowledge and perspective and will shift mine a bit as I learned more from you.
Thanks!
 
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