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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
Just looking for some advice for water changes on a 200 gallon. Currently, I am doing water changes once a week with something like a drip system and auto top off mechanism but the water is being sucked out a bit faster. I leave it over night so it goes for about 12 hours. I can see that the water is very clear after the water change. However, the following day or two, the water becomes pretty cloudy again, almost like a yellowish/light brown colour. I have a feeling it might be due to the amount of flow in my tank that is constantly blowing debris everywhere. However, decreasing the flow in the past has lead to my plants not doing so well. I have aquasoil in my tank so I dont think vacuuming the substrate is an option. In addition to this, I feel that my drip system doesnt really siphon out much of the debris since the diameter of the tube siphoning out the water is no more than 0.5 cm.

So my question is, would it be more beneficial to do manual water changes where I actually siphon out 50% of the water and possibly some debris wherever possible and replace this water along with water conditioner? It would take a lot more time and manual labour but if it will eventually help with the cloudiness, I would be willing to try this method out.

Anyone have experience with cloudiness/water changes on larger planted tanks?
 

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I do not know what kind of water you are adding to the tank. My guess is that you are adding chlorinated water, and not using a dechlorinator such as Seachem Prime. If this is the case the chlorine would be killing off your bacteria. The cloudiness would be caused by your tank re-cycling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do not know what kind of water you are adding to the tank. My guess is that you are adding chlorinated water, and not using a dechlorinator such as Seachem Prime. If this is the case the chlorine would be killing off your bacteria. The cloudiness would be caused by your tank re-cycling.
hm. Yea, when I use the drip method, I don't really add a dechlorinator. So maybe whenever I start my drip water change, I should add enough dechlorinator for about 50% of the tank volume? Would this have any negative affect to the fish and plants?
 

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Killing off bacteria and cycling a tank will have negative affects to the fish since they will be subjected to higher ammonia levels. I would add dechlorinator for sure. The only thing is, you don't really know how much to add since you are adding new, and subtracting new and old water at the same time. Prime is safe to overdose. I always play it safe, but if it was me, I would probably dose 75% of the tank volume before the water change, and 25% of the volume after the water change.
 

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Brown or yellow tinted water, not clouded, is highly likely tannins from the soil, driftwood, or other source. Vacuuming the debris could help a lot.
A water change where the refill water has chlorine or chloramines and no dechlor could kill microorganisms, fish, and shrimp. A 10% top off has been OK IME.
A water change that is done your was (refill as it empties) is really only doing about half as much as the gallons would suggest; that is, if you take out 100 gallons you are really only doing a 25% water change.
Suggestion: Start of he water change by vacuuming the tank and refill with prepared water. This might take 20-30 gallons. Then set up your constant water change system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Killing off bacteria and cycling a tank will have negative affects to the fish since they will be subjected to higher ammonia levels. I would add dechlorinator for sure. The only thing is, you don't really know how much to add since you are adding new, and subtracting new and old water at the same time. Prime is safe to overdose. I always play it safe, but if it was me, I would probably dose 75% of the tank volume before the water change, and 25% of the volume after the water change.
Will give this a try. Thank you.

Brown or yellow tinted water, not clouded, is highly likely tannins from the soil, driftwood, or other source. Vacuuming the debris could help a lot.
A water change where the refill water has chlorine or chloramines and no dechlor could kill microorganisms, fish, and shrimp. A 10% top off has been OK IME.
A water change that is done your was (refill as it empties) is really only doing about half as much as the gallons would suggest; that is, if you take out 100 gallons you are really only doing a 25% water change.
Suggestion: Start of he water change by vacuuming the tank and refill with prepared water. This might take 20-30 gallons. Then set up your constant water change system.
I had a feeling it could be tannins but my soil has been in this tank for at least a year. My other guess is that it is coming from my ohko stone. When i purchased it, there was so much clay attached to it. I have a feeling that when I tried washing everything out, I didn;t quite get it all off and it is now slowing coming off. I will try vacuuming first and then use the constant water change with added prime. Thanks for you advice
 

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I doing the same as you but on a fish only tank. I change water at about 8 gallon an hour. My water stays clear. I haven't hosed anything from the bottom in 6 months. But in a plant tank I would at least once month. There just to much crap that build up in a plant tank. I also would keep the drip method the tank will befit from the change.
 
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