The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently use the Seachem line of products (Trace, Nitrogen, Potassium, Phosphate) and Aquarium Co-op Easy Iron. I would like to switch to the Planted Aquarium Fertilizer line because I'm about to run out of Seachem ferts and I would like a more cost effective way, but I'm not exactly sure what to buy.

Also do I need to add calcium (calcium nitrate, calcium chloride, or calcium sulfate).

I use RO/DI remineralized with Seachem Equilibrium and Alkalinity Buffer. When I run out of those I will also switch to a more cost effective product.

Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
  • You're going to need 3 different salts for your Macros; KNO3 (Nitrates), KH2PO4 (Phosphates), and K2SO4 (Potassium)
  • For Micros, there are two different approaches. 1.) An all in one micro mix like CSM+B or Miller's Microplex or 2.) "Roll your own" aka mix your own micros in the concentrations you want
  • If you're using a premix micro, a lot of people will add a little extra Iron, and with RO water, I would use EDTA Chelated Fe.
  • If you're using RO water, then you will need CaSO4 (Calcium) and MgSO4 (Magnesium)

As far as supplies, you're going to want:
  • A quality scale that can measure from 0 - 300g at a resolution of .01g. If you are going to "roll your own" micros, then you're also going to want a smaller scale that can measure down to a resolution of .001g.
  • Dosing bottles

You'll mix all of the things above using rotalabutterfly.com 's nutrient calculator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
If you are going to "roll your own" micros, then you're also going to want a smaller scale that can measure down to a resolution of .001g.
For custom traces I'd go for reference solution for each chemicals. It is not easy to measure to such a small weights. And hyper-accurate scales cost more.

I'd make a liter of 0.1%(1,000 parts per million) solution for each chemical and then dilute them accordingly.
Then everything gets so easy: just putting in 1mL of ref solution to 999mL water dilutes it by 1/1000. If that is not enough then you can just repeat more.
1mL of X% solution per 10L(10,000mL) will give X ppm. In other words 1% = 10,000 ppm.
It takes more brain then just using rotalabutterfly but its easy enough.

Store ref solution in cool dark place. Ideally no transparent bottles.
It will last for long time. Especially with something like ascorbic acid and potassium sorbate.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If you're using RO water, then you will need CaSO4 (Calcium) and MgSO4 (Magnesium)
Do I need to add CaSO4 and MgSO4 in addition to Equilibrium and alkalinity buffer?
And for now I still have a gallon of Seachem Trace so I Don't have to worry about micros but thanks for the info.

Also do you have any recommendations for dosing bottles? Some of the products from PlantedAquariumFertilizer come with them.

If you're using a premix micro, a lot of people will add a little extra Iron, and with RO water, I would use EDTA Chelated Fe
Is that the same as Iron chelate with DTPA?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
To answer questions in order:

No, you wouldn't need Ca & Mg in addition to Equilibrium. They would be in place of...

For dosing bottles, I use something like these from GLA.


EDTA and DTPA are just the Chelators. EDTA is better at lower pH, DTPA is better at higher pH.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
To answer questions in order:

No, you wouldn't need Ca & Mg in addition to Equilibrium. They would be in place of...

For dosing bottles, I use something like these from GLA.


EDTA and DTPA are just the Chelators. EDTA is better at lower pH, DTPA is better at higher pH.
One last question (for now): Where do you buy your dry ferts from? Thank you so much for your help. I still have a lot to learn but you have sent me in the right direction.
 

·
Premium Member
75g, 40g, 20g
Joined
·
3,848 Posts
To answer questions in order:

No, you wouldn't need Ca & Mg in addition to Equilibrium. They would be in place of...

For dosing bottles, I use something like these from GLA.


EDTA and DTPA are just the Chelators. EDTA is better at lower pH, DTPA is better at higher pH.
Thought I would add just a bit more info to the RED text above.
DTPA is an excellent iron source up to media pH 7.0; however, 60 percent of the iron is precipitated and unavailable by pH 8.0.
EDTA strongly holds iron in solution up to media pH 6.0, however, by pH 6.5, almost one-half the iron is precipitated.
Selecting which iron chelate to use
more fun reading, aquarium related...
Chelated Iron In Aquariums - DTPA, EDTA or EDDHA
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top