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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Sadly my low pressure gauge seems to be reading way too low..

As a safety measure I added a 60psi relief valve onto my low pressure side.. Anytime I pushed the Victor past 20psi-ish the relief valve opened up.
Today I swapped out the pres. r valve for a second smaller scale guage.. (there is a tee in my circuit past the solenoid) That gauge was past 50psi while the lp on the regulator was showing like 20..

Unless I'm missing something I'm pretty sure the gauge is bad or out of adjustment (are they adj?? I'm not seeing it, though there are 2 Phillips screws on back)....

Soo that poses a minor dilemma.. The E series has a lp range of 10-200 psi BUT "we" really don't use that kind of range.. so I'm thinking of replacing it w/ a lower range gauge for better accuracy.. like 0-100 or 0-200 ect..(orig is 0-400psi)
Technically this is not "standard" but..what do you think????
smaller scale or stick w/ "standard"..??

http://www.ashcroft.com/products/pressure_gauges/test/upload/BigGauge-I-M.pdf
 

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Sounds like the low pressure gauge might be bad. The gauge itself is not adjustable.

You can try swapping it out for a lower range gauge, and it will help you "dial in" the delivery pressure. However, understand that doing so will not change the minimum delivery pressure that the regulator is capable of.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks .. made a judgement call and bought this one:
261214418416

based on this:
1.1 Range – The range of the instrument should be approximately
twice the maximum operating pressure. Too low a
range may result in (a) low fatigue life of the elastic element
due to high operating stress and (b) susceptibility to overpressure
set due to pressure transients that exceed the normal
operating pressure. Too high a range may yield insufficient
resolution for the application.
There are cheaper and the range could be smaller but I thought it was a fair compromise.. and made in the USA.. ;)

Another related question.. anyone have a 450e that can tell me appprox. how much they turn the lp adj. to reach say 35psi? For reference..
 

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Another related question.. anyone have a 450e that can tell me appprox. how much they turn the lp adj. to reach say 35psi? For reference..
I don't have a VTS450E anymore (sold it), but I recall it wasn't a lot. Maybe 1/2 a turn?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't have a VTS450E anymore (sold it), but I recall it wasn't a lot. Maybe 1/2 a turn?
Sounds right .. at least it is in the ballpark of less than one full turn..
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Got the new gauge.. now lp and pr valve are in "synch"... and I'm not blowing 80psi though the in line atomizer
 

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Just reading through and wondered if you got the real importance of the quote you had:

1.1 Range – The range of the instrument should be approximately
twice the maximum operating pressure. Too low a
range may result in (a) low fatigue life of the elastic element
due to high operating stress and (b) susceptibility to overpressure
set due to pressure transients that exceed the normal
operating pressure. Too high a range may yield insufficient
resolution for the application.

Some who are not up on using pressure may miss what this says. Boiled down, it says something like this? Inside the meter there is often a really thin metal tube (elastic element?) that has to flex each time the gas is turned on or changed. This small tube moving is what makes the meter handle move by being connected through some mechanical gizmos.
(a) low fatigue life of the elastic element
due to high operating stress and (b) susceptibility to overpressure
set due to pressure transients that exceed the normal
operating pressure. This says that when you open the tank valve, really high pressure may go through and hit the meter with way more than the little tube can handle.

Avoid blowing your low pressure meter by backing the working pressure all the way off to zero BEFORE opening the tank valve. People often miss this and they have bad meters then. Back it off open the tank valve slowly and then turn the adjustment back up to the pressure you need. This lets the main reg parts get their act together so they are regulating the pressure fed to the meter rather than just blowing the guts out of the meter.
It'll make your meter last longer!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Some who are not up on using pressure may miss what this says. Boiled down, it says something like this? Inside the meter there is often a really thin metal tube (elastic element?)
Gauge is 2 1/2" across. Copper Bourdon tube is 3/8 wide..
My failure looks to be more related to the air sampling part in the bottom of part. There is a brass "cup" inside which I suspect failed..
 

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Good picture to show what we might find inside the meter.
I did not mean that your meter had this failure, just more of an info bit for anybody first using regs. Isn't it amazing how complicated instructions can sometimes be written? While I'm sure it is the correct technical name for that part, it can sure be confusing to the guy that most needs the instructions. When I read "elastic element", it took a couple minutes to think what they meant.

I'm always glad to see somebody bold enough to tear down a few things to find what the real problem might be. It doesn't always follow that we can fix it but it does help us avoid repeating the same mistake sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Good picture to show what we might find inside the meter.
I did not mean that your meter had this failure, just more of an info bit for anybody first using regs. Isn't it amazing how complicated instructions can sometimes be written? While I'm sure it is the correct technical name for that part, it can sure be confusing to the guy that most needs the instructions. When I read "elastic element", it took a couple minutes to think what they meant.

I'm always glad to see somebody bold enough to tear down a few things to find what the real problem might be. It doesn't always follow that we can fix it but it does help us avoid repeating the same mistake sometimes.
Helps when you have broken one.. and the Ashcroft pdf.. ;)
But no matter what I read.. there is no mention of this, its function or part
I was expecting a "plain hole" but it was not meant to be:


My new one had this "cup" near the bottom. The boken one is way up there.. Does that mean anything.. ? I'm tempted to drill it out and see.. ;)
 

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I can't say that I've ever spent much time looking at a meter from that end. No broken ones on hand either.

But drill it out to see? That might be a little too bold for me if the meter works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I can't say that I've ever spent much time looking at a meter from that end. No broken ones on hand either.

But drill it out to see? That might be a little too bold for me if the meter works.
That is the bad one.. 60psi looks like 20........
 
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