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Ok so I made a DIY python for quick and easy water changes etc. so my question is if you run it to fill your aquarium how do you treat it for chlorine?
 

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I add the dechlor in the tank directly as I add in the water. If you use Prime, dose for the amount your adding, not the whole tank. I remember reading somewhere not to overdose.
 

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Actually Crazy you are wrong. On back of the prime bottle in the directions it says "if adding directly to aquarium base dose on aquarium volume".It also says that you can dose up to 5X the amount in case of a nitrite emergency.
 

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Yes, but wouldn't an overdose cause a virtual decrease in bioload resulting in a reduction of nitrifing bacteria (NOR)? ie. mini-cycle?
 

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nope....how would that happen? Prime does not cause ammonia,nitirite,or nitrate to dissapear it just makes them less dangerous to fish. Plus dosing the volume is not overdose it is what is reccomended on bottle!
 

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Yes, Prime is does not kill the bacteria. this is from the Seachem website.

Q:I tested my tap water after using Prime and came up with an ammonia reading. Is this because of chloramine? Could you explain how this works in removing chloramine?
A: Prime works by removing chlorine from the water and then binds with ammonia until it can be consumed by your biological filtration (chloramine minus chlorine = ammonia). The bond is not reversible and ammonia is still available for your bacteria to consume. Prime will not halt your cycling process.
I am going to assume that you were using a liquid based reagent test kit (Nessler based, silica). Any type of reducing agent or ammonia binder (dechlorinators, etc) will give you a false positive. You can avoid this by using our Multitest Ammonia kit (not affected by reducing agents) or you can wait to test, Prime dissipates from your system within 24 hours.

Q: How does Prime make a difference in reducing Nitrates?
A: The detoxification of nitrite and nitrate by Prime (when used at elevated levels) is not well understood from a mechanistic standpoint. The most likely explanation is that the nitrite and nitrate is removed in a manner similar to the way ammonia is removed; i.e. it is bound and held in a inert state until such time that bacteria in the biological filter are able to take a hold of it, break it apart and use it. Two other possible scenarios are reduction to nitrogen (N2) gas or conversion into a benign organic nitrogen compound.
I wish we had some more "concrete" explanation, but the end result is the same, it does actually detoxify nitrite and nitrate. This was unexpected chemically and thus initially we were not even aware of this, however we received numerous reports from customers stating that when they overdosed with Prime they were able to reduce or eliminate the high death rates they experienced when their nitrite and nitrate levels were high. We have received enough reports to date to ensure that this is no fluke and is in fact a verifiable function of the product.


http://www.seachem.com/support/FAQs/Prime_faq.html
 

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Interesting reading. "We didn't know it worked, don't know how it works, but it works" lol

I also have seen that the bottle says that it could be overdosed but chose not to.

Nano, it sounds like these guys know thier stuff but I think it can be seen where I was comming from...
 

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I've always dosed for aquarium volume back when I used stress coat, and now that I use prime. (knocking wood) :)
Assuming that this won't harm the fish, isn't it simply overkill anyway?

If you are doing a 50% WC on a 50 gallon tank, why add enough Prime for 50 gallons of water if 25 of those gallons have already been treated? Seems wasteful to me. I'm sure that Seachem doesn't mind you using all the extra product though $$$:icon_roll
 

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Assuming that this won't harm the fish, isn't it simply overkill anyway?

If you are doing a 50% WC on a 50 gallon tank, why add enough Prime for 50 gallons of water if 25 of those gallons have already been treated? Seems wasteful to me. I'm sure that Seachem doesn't mind you using all the extra product though $$$:icon_roll
From what I have gathered over time from seachem and dosing prime is: Prime reacts with so many different things (ammonia, nitrite, chlorine, chloramine, not sure what else) that I think the purpose of dosing the full-tank volume when adding water directly to the tank is just a safe-guard to make sure that there is enough to react with all of the chlorine/chloramine. Keep in mind that with chloramine the prime reacts with the chlorine and the ammonia.

This isn't written in stone anywhere. Its just kind of my interpretation of things developed over time.

Prime is safe to overdose up to 5x according to seachem, but watch the 02 level.


See Seachem's response--Post #2:

Dosing Prime....?
 

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From what I have gathered over time from seachem and dosing prime is: Prime reacts with so many different things (ammonia, nitrite, chlorine, chloramine, not sure what else) that I think the purpose of dosing the full-tank volume when adding water directly to the tank is just a safe-guard to make sure that there is enough to react with all of the chlorine/chloramine. Keep in mind that with chloramine the prime reacts with the chlorine and the ammonia.
Thanks Naja,
That is why I do it. IMO Better safe than sorry.
I do it for 125 gallons, so it's something like 13 ml instead of 6 ml.

BTW,m this is what works for me. Can I get by with less? Maybe, but it works.
 

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For some reason using Prime worries me...
I use it, but it appears to be so powerful that it uses so little, which makes me wonder whether this little bit would do all that water!
 
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