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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
wanted to get an opinion: would upgrading individual parts here and there on a regulator be a worthwhile endeavor? I have a Milwaukee, and am curious whether or not replacing say the stock needle valve with a nicer Swagelok be a sound idea? my interest here is rather than shelling out a couple hundred at once on the components of a nice custom reg, could i do it over and indefinite amount of time by just swapping out parts on mine. Just a thought!
 

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wanted to get an opinion: would upgrading individual parts here and there on a regulator be a worthwhile endeavor? I have a Milwaukee, and am curious whether or not replacing say the stock needle valve with a nicer Swagelok be a sound idea? my interest here is rather than shelling out a couple hundred at once on the components of a nice custom reg, could i do it over and indefinite amount of time by just swapping out parts on mine. Just a thought!
What other parts are you talking about? The most important part is the needle valve and the only part I would replace. From what I've read in the past, the Milwaukee reg is descent but it's major flaw is the needle valve.
 

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Deferred spending is often a good idea! Especially true if one has to ever put any of that spending on credit.
So I would say it would be a great idea in many cases but you do have to make some personal decisions on how it may fit for you. Changing out a few of the minor parts can be a real money saver if done carefully. first step might be to decide which parts are a problem to you. Many of the cheaper commercial sets do have some real questions for the minor items like needle valves or solenoids and it can make a great improvement to change one if it is giving you trouble. Spending $20-50 now versus spending $220 on a credit card is pretty much a no-brainer but you can get more value even there with some careful shopping and decisions. I like the idea of looking, researching and buying at the right time when you have the option. With luck you might find a great needle valve, for instance, at half the cost if you do some careful shopping and get a bit of luck.
The downside is that you may also have to spend a bit more time and effort when changing out a bit here and a bit there. Upside is that it does come much easier as you go along and learn details of what works best.
I highly recommend what you propose. And while looking for one item, keep the eyes open for great deals on some of the other parts by looking at the reg setup as a group of parts, rather than a single item as they are often sold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Deferred spending is often a good idea! Especially true if one has to ever put any of that spending on credit.
So I would say it would be a great idea in many cases but you do have to make some personal decisions on how it may fit for you. Changing out a few of the minor parts can be a real money saver if done carefully. first step might be to decide which parts are a problem to you. Many of the cheaper commercial sets do have some real questions for the minor items like needle valves or solenoids and it can make a great improvement to change one if it is giving you trouble. Spending $20-50 now versus spending $220 on a credit card is pretty much a no-brainer but you can get more value even there with some careful shopping and decisions. I like the idea of looking, researching and buying at the right time when you have the option. With luck you might find a great needle valve, for instance, at half the cost if you do some careful shopping and get a bit of luck.
The downside is that you may also have to spend a bit more time and effort when changing out a bit here and a bit there. Upside is that it does come much easier as you go along and learn details of what works best.
I highly recommend what you propose. And while looking for one item, keep the eyes open for great deals on some of the other parts by looking at the reg setup as a group of parts, rather than a single item as they are often sold.
this sums up how i was thinking about the idea. i'll first keep my eyes peeled for a deal on a higher quality needle valve and go on from there. thanks!:grin2:
 

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Sounds like a good plan to me as I read many complaints on that setup and one of the most common is the funky operation of the needle valve. At some point in the future, you may also want to change the solenoid as that type tends to draw more power than some. More power drawn often means more heat and the solenoid movement doesn't play well after it stays pulled for long periods so that it gets hot. Not a total putdown of the equipment as it does the job but it may at some point get so it sticks on or off. Just something to watch for later. Meanwhile you do have pressure CO2 up and there is quite a lot to say for that!
 

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If youre replacing the needle valve, solenoid, and accessory fittings...it would run you less than $100 to just tack on a nice dual stage regulator body and have a full custom job. You can sell that Milwaukee and cover the cost of your needle valve and maybe a check valve. Or keep it as a backup..:.but if your regulator doesn't have a leak, and you get a good one, you won't need a backup. It'll outlive you


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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If youre replacing the needle valve, solenoid, and accessory fittings...it would run you less than $100 to just tack on a nice dual stage regulator body and have a full custom job. You can sell that Milwaukee and cover the cost of your needle valve and maybe a check valve. Or keep it as a backup..:.but if your regulator doesn't have a leak, and you get a good one, you won't need a backup. It'll outlive you


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My whole idea is to do it piece by piece, like solenoid when I have an extra $40 to burn, check valve when I have some solid OT at work etc. Gonna work my way up to a fully sick custom reg
 

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wanted to get an opinion: would upgrading individual parts here and there on a regulator be a worthwhile endeavor? I have a Milwaukee, and am curious whether or not replacing say the stock needle valve with a nicer Swagelok be a sound idea? my interest here is rather than shelling out a couple hundred at once on the components of a nice custom reg, could i do it over and indefinite amount of time by just swapping out parts on mine. Just a thought!
you can upgrade the needle valve cheaply..
since you can put this "in-line" really no need for any parts but hose barbs..
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/9-equipment/1025601-needle-valve-inexpensive-option.html

Then start parts gathering a 2 stage reg, solenoid ect..
clippard mouse solenoid, smc " speed control" valve and a new reg.. done really..
Want to go all fancy ss /chrome/solid parts.. well gather them seperately..
Just change the needle valve till the milwaukee blows a gasket.

Point is assembly-ing the parts to specifically fit the ALL new reg. is a lot more err... continuity.. than tinker toying w/ the Milwaukee..
At least in my mind.
 

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Have you used the milwaukee yet with the existing NV? It might not be as bad as you thing. I've been using several for years with the exisiting valve and it's been fine. When you initially set it up you have to play around with the working pressure and needle valve to find a combination that keeps it steady, but once I've done that it's bee nine.

One of mine I replaced with a 2-way splitter year's ago and all is good.
 

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Inline needle valve is a new idea to me. That much pressure in the tubing doesn't run the risk of a rupture? I think I like the idea of building a second regulator and when it's done selling the Milwaukee. Thanks for the input.

Have you used the milwaukee yet with the existing NV? It might not be as bad as you thing. I've been using several for years with the exisiting valve and it's been fine. When you initially set it up you have to play around with the working pressure and needle valve to find a combination that keeps it steady, but once I've done that it's bee nine.

One of mine I replaced with a 2-way splitter year's ago and all is good.
I've been running it and it's somewhat steady. I followed the instructions that tell you to essentially ignore the working pressure side gauge and only use the bubble counter. So with the needle valve totally open, I adjusted the working pressure knob to about 1bps (I'm staying light until I get my drop checker sorted) and then fine tuned with the needle valve. Everything seems to be working well but I'm so worried about coming home one day to a tank full of gassed fish hahah.
 
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