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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a sump in my 75 gal and I am putting one together for my new 40 gal . I would like to know if , you use a heater controller , do you put the probe in the tank or the sump . Can it go in the sump ? I use them and I have the probes in the tank . I would like to put them in the sumps , less equipment in tank . Also , can you have the input from a canister filter in the sump and the return in the tank ? Not to drive the sump , I have pumps for that ,but just to get the canister intake out of the tank . TIA for any advice .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do have the heaters in the sump , I want to know if I can put the temperature probe from the controller in the sump or will it be better off in the tank . I use redundant filtration so I have many options for what media I use . I can use the canister for polishing or extra bio media .
 

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oh, i see - i misread. yes, i use a temperature controller and i put the probe in the sump. i put it near the drains from the display and before where the heaters themselves are in terms of flow through the sump.

it's never occurred to me to use a canister for additional filtration. i don't see any reason you couldn't do it if you're out of room in the sump for all the media you need/want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok on probe . I will try it on my big tank first . I don't think the canister will work as I wanted . The can will be at the same level as the sump so it can't get a syphon . Thanks for the replies .
 

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I go a step further... I have a centralized system of 6 display tanks and a sump that consist of 2 tanks.
I use an undersubstrate heating cable (25W) in each of the 6 display tanks (20 gallon longs).... and a larger 100W submersible heater in the 2nd sump section (also a 20 gallon long). I locate my probes right at the point where the water flows from the 1st sump section (also a 20 gallong long) into the 2nd sump section. So the controller (a Raspberry Pi with relay expansion modules) is turning on 7 heating devices that total about 250W to heat the 140gallons of water that exist in the entire system. I feel like I get really even heating this way and the RTD is not so influenced by the sump heater that is 18" away. The undersubstrate heating cable is not invasive and the single white cord that leaves the tank is very easy to manage.

During the summer months, when the interior of my home is 78 to 80degF (live in the desert), I will probably disconnect the 100W heater altogether and the 6 substrate cables will be swithced on/off to maintain exact temp.

During the coldest winter months the heating cables are plugged into an always on socket... and the 100W heater becomes the variable heater that is plugged into the relay controlled outlet...therefore switched on/off to maintain exact temp.

Sping/Autumn... like now... all 7 devices are plugged into the relay controlled outlet..

fun stuff. with your setup... I'd just run a heater in the sump like you intend to do... and I wouldn't sweat having the probe in the sump as well... eliminate wires.
 

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I have a sump in my 75 gal and I am putting one together for my new 40 gal . I would like to know if , you use a heater controller , do you put the probe in the tank or the sump . Can it go in the sump ? I use them and I have the probes in the tank . I would like to put them in the sumps , less equipment in tank . Also , can you have the input from a canister filter in the sump and the return in the tank ? Not to drive the sump , I have pumps for that ,but just to get the canister intake out of the tank . TIA for any advice .
I have 4 heaters in the 55g sump for my 180g tank. The three 300w heaters are set to 78 degrees and plugged into the inkbird heater controller which is set at 80 degrees. The 100w heater is set to 78 degrees and not plugged into the inkbird controller. The inkbird is set to alarm at 74 degrees low and 82 degrees high. The inkbird probe is in the sump. Occasionally the Inkbird alarm has gone off when I knock the sensor out of the water while working on the sump.

There is no exact temperature setting on any of the four Eheim Jager heaters so only one of them actually comes on when the temp goes down to 77 degrees. The others come on when the temperature is even lower so the water heats up faster. 1 of the heaters does 90% of the actual heating. The Inkbird controller doesn't actually control the tank temperature it is just there to keep a heater from malfunctioning and boiling the tank... or alarm if all the the heaters fail. The three 300w Jager heaters were considerably less expensive ($28.85 each) than two 500w Jager heaters. The 100w Jeager is just an extra I had lying around.

I spent and extra $10 for the WiFi enabled Inkbird controller. It was a complete waste of $10 because I could never get any of my devices to connect to it to set it up. Research on the internet show this is a very common problem with the Inkbird WiFi. It works fine as just a temperature controller without the WiFi though. It is also an acurate thermometer for the tank that can be calibrated with ice water and boiling water. Some people complain about the inkbird sensors failing (usually in salt water tanks) and suggest putting a thin film of silicone sealer over the metal probe and the junction where the wire enters the probe. I did this on mine.

Most canister filters have relativiely small pumps that are not made to lift water. They are designed to return the water to the same level they take it out of the tank at so they take a lot less power to just push water through the closed system of the canister. So the flow will be GREATLY reduced if you configure a canister to pull from the sump and return to the tank.

Why do you need a sump and a canister?
 

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Which inkbird model did you purchase that support multiple heaters ?

On the canister filter - i think the problem is not the pump pushing water into the tank - this is actually a common configuration. The problem is that the inflow into the canister filter is not pump driven it is gravity driven.

I have 4 heaters in the 55g sump for my 180g tank. The three 300w heaters are set to 78 degrees and plugged into the inkbird heater controller which is set at 80 degrees. The 100w heater is set to 78 degrees and not plugged into the inkbird controller. The inkbird is set to alarm at 74 degrees low and 82 degrees high. The inkbird probe is in the sump. Occasionally the Inkbird alarm has gone off when I knock the sensor out of the water while working on the sump.



Most canister filters have relativiely small pumps that are not made to lift water. They are designed to return the water to the same level they take it out of the tank at so they take a lot less power to just push water through the closed system of the canister. So the flow will be GREATLY reduced if you configure a canister to pull from the sump and return to the tank.

Why do you need a sump and a canister?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I don't need to run a sump and a canister , but I will have to run both to seed the sump . After I get them both setup , might as well leave them . I am in the "can't have too much filtration" camp...lol
 

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Which inkbird model did you purchase that supports multiple heaters ?
Nothing special. I just used a splitter. As long as the max wattage of the Inkbird (1100w) isn't exceeded by the total wattage of the heaters (In my case 3 x 300w):
1028336


P.S. I pushed the third heater plug in the rest of the way after I took this picture. I was just too lazy to take another picture, transfer it to my computer, resize it then post it. :)

I don't need to run a sump and a canister , but I will have to run both to seed the sump . After I get them both setup , might as well leave them . I am in the "can't have too much filtration" camp...lol
I understand. :) In that case you might consider putting the intake tube of the canister in the first chamber of your sump and the return tube into the last chamber of your sump. That would get them out of your main tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I understand. :) In that case you might consider putting the intake tube of the canister in the first chamber of your sump and the return tube into the last chamber of your sump. That would get them out of your main tank.
I hadn't thought of that . I will definitely put some thought in that idea . That's why I ask here cause someone is gonna come up with the answer . Thanks .
 
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