The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How does one treat for ich in a planted tank? The most common method for treating ich is to raise temperature and add salt but the salt isn't good for plants. Is there any way besides having to remove all the plants? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
I tend to move all of the affected fish to a quarantine tank. if you don't have any inverts you could just use meds in the tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Ive just successfully treated ich in my 17g planted tank with just heat. No salt. I raised the temp to 86/87F and left it there for 2 weeks. No sign of it now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Kordon makes an organic/natural "Ich Attack" that is totally plant safe. You can get it at PetSmart and you use it daily for 1 week. The bottle treats up to 920 gallons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,350 Posts
I used to have some malachite green drops. Very concentrated (1 drop per gallon) and didn't contain the formalin that most ick meds also contain.

Used it in my planted tanks many times without problems, and it always took care of the ick. No good for shrimp though, since malachite green is copper-based.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies. I have a bottle of quick cure. Does anyone have experience with that in planted tanks? If not I'll try one of the methods above.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
532 Posts
How does one treat for ich in a planted tank? The most common method for treating ich is to raise temperature and add salt but the salt isn't good for plants. Is there any way besides having to remove all the plants? Thanks.
UV sterilizer is effective and safe for all the things in a tank.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
532 Posts
I used to have some malachite green drops. Very concentrated (1 drop per gallon) and didn't contain the formalin that most ick meds also contain.
Malachite green is NOT a recommended treatment for Ich. From "Ichthyophthirius Multifiliis (White Spot) Infections in Fish":

"The chemicals listed above (copper sulfate, potassium permanganate, formalin, and salt) are all excellent treatments for 'Ich'. Malachite green is mentioned for the sake of completion, but is not recommended by the authors. The chemical is hazardous to handle- it is known to cause cancer, mutations, and is harmful to fetuses.
. . .
This chemical is extremely harsh on fish, particularly on gill tissue, so be careful not to overdose the fish.
. . .
Malachite green can be very toxic to scaleless fish and should be avoided on these species."



Used it in my planted tanks many times without problems, and it always took care of the ick. No good for shrimp though, since malachite green is copper-based.
Repeating Ich outbreaks may indicate problem with the environment or maintenance. From "Ich (White Spot Disease)":

"maintaining well-nourished fish helps significantly in preventing Ich. It is not unusual for emaciated, starved fish to become infected with Ich."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
I had a case of Ich a while back and i upped my temperature to almost 90, for like 2 weeks, not ideal for the plants, but it didn't cause too much damage, but I had pretty hardy plants at the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the info. I've bumped up the temperature for 2 days now and the few spots seem to be decreasing in numbers so I might just stick with that for now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,350 Posts
Repeating Ich outbreaks may indicate problem with the environment or maintenance.
Every ich outbreak I've had was after the purchase of a new fish.

And while you can find quotes to support any strange opinion you might have, the fact remains that malachite green is the most common chemical used in ich medications.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
733 Posts
Thanks for the replies. I have a bottle of quick cure. Does anyone have experience with that in planted tanks? If not I'll try one of the methods above.
I had an outbreak awhile back. I used the heat method, raised to about 86-88 for 2 weeks. I also used quick cure at the same time for maybe a week. All fish and plants survived. I used the quick cure at half does though because I had tetras and catfish.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
532 Posts
Every ich outbreak I've had was after the purchase of a new fish.
Ich outbreak is often triggered by fish stress due to improper handling or environment.


And while you can find quotes to support any strange opinion you might have, the fact remains that malachite green is the most common chemical used in ich medications.
Being the most common chemical in use does not mean it is the best one to use.

What the informed people do may seem strange to the uninformed. I guess the idea that animal protein promotes cancer growth is another "strange" thing to you ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,186 Posts
this was about helping the OP deal with a problem in his tank right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,350 Posts
I've used salt and heat successfully as well. And would prefer that to chemicals, at least in principle.

But heat can be stressful to fish also. And salt is supposed to be harmful to scaleless fish as well, though I've never actually had any problems with either salt or malachite green. I did see some minor plant wilting from salt, and the affected plants experienced slower growth for a few weeks after the treatment.

So in the end, any method has potential risks. Be well informed, and choose whichever set of risks appeals more to you. :)

However, I do take issue when someone spreads disinformation by quoting references, while conveniently and selectively replacing things that put it in proper context with "..." as Zdnet has done.

To clear things up, here is the full paragraph, with the omitted portions in bold:

" Malachite green is another chemical which can be used to treat ornamental fish that are housed indoors. This chemical should NEVER be used to treat food fish. Not only is this illegal and unethical, but it is totally unnecessary. The chemicals listed above (copper sulfate, potassium permanganate, formalin, and salt) are all excellent treatments for "Ich". Malachite green is mentioned for the sake of completion, but is not recommended by the authors. The chemical is hazardous to handle- it is known to cause cancer, mutations, and is harmful to fetuses. Gloves and a protective mask should always be worn when handling the concentrated powder. Pregnant personnel should NEVER handle this chemical. Despite its toxicity, it is commonly used to control parasitic protozoans on ornamental fish and is quite effective when used at concentrations of 0.05 to 0.10 mg/L as an indefinite bath. This chemical is extremely harsh on fish, particularly on gill tissue, so be careful not to overdose the fish. Malachite green can also be combined with formalin (0.2 mg/L malachite green mixed with 25 mg/L formalin) to treat external protozoan diseases. The two chemicals work well together and are quite effective. Malachite green can be very toxic to scaleless fish and should be avoided on these species."

Note how he's effectively distorted the quote, by omitting the majority of it that shows:

1) This paragraph's recommendations are specific to best practices for large-scale ornamental fish farming businesses. The article has a separate section which addresses hobbyists and pet fish, which says "Pet fish can be treated with any of the chemicals discussed above to correct 'Ich' infections. A number of commercial preparations are available from pet stores which contain one or several of these agents." And as I previously stated, most of the preparations found in pet stores contain malachite green; so the article does in fact consider malachite green an acceptable treatment.

2) The danger from handling malachite green is specifically for concentrated powders, again as might be used in large-scale operations; which can be accidentally inhaled, or significantly absorbed through the skin due to their strength. There is no danger handling heavily prediluted liquid solutions, like the average hobbyist uses.

3) Malachite green is in fact effective, and can be used safely even as an indefinite bath, as long as it is dosed properly.

That, along with other references posted in this thread (cell phone use and eating animals causes cancer!) should be enough to demonstrate a particular agenda and pattern of bias on his part. Which I'd consider extreme enough that the OP and others should be aware of it, so that his statements can be properly taken with... well, an extra grain of salt. :hihi:
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top