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Transporting fish

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Okay so soon it's time for me to move to college. Awesomely, I'm allowed to have fish so I can bring my 10 gallon with me! Thankfully my college is in-state and only about an hour and 15 minutes away (67.5 miles to be exact). I'm wondering how I should transport my fish safely. I have 6 harlequin rasboras that are not too old and I think will travel fine. I also have 2 neon tetras who are oooolldddd boys (the last two remaining members of the Broadway Gang) who are at least 4 years old and I love them to death, and a at least 3 year old dwarf gourami who I'm really worried about traveling. So any ideas of how to get my babies to college with me?
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Reduce stress by having the bag in a dark area (cooler) or covering with a paper bag.

I also have had good luck with transporting in a gallon jug with a cap - any fish that fits nicely through the opening will travel nicely as well.
 

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3G or 5g buckets with lid from homedepot or lows, don't fill to top leave some air, movement of the vechicsl will help aerate the water.
 

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This is a place where you can take the easy way and it may work or you can do it the way pros who ship fish do it. Your choice of course but if you want to do it right, there are some basics to follow. Get regular bags from the fish store. Most will be glad to help and show you how to bag and tie. Separate the fish so that any large don't pick on the smaller. Double bag so that there is no corner for a fish to get his head stuck down in where he may be stuck. Bag and tie first bag and then stick it head first down into the second bag. This rounds the corners as well as provides protection from leakers. For just an hour or two, just plain water is fine. Don't feed them the day before. They will not starve and it cuts waste which causes ammonia. Just enough water so that all fish can swim easily. Catch the top so that as much air is trapped in the bag before you tie it with rubber bands. They need air, more water doesn't help as much as more air. Put the bags in a box and close the lid. As long as you keep them in a place where you would be comfortable, they are good for at least six hours easy. It doesn't hurt to tape the box shut just in case there is a sudden stop that you didn't plan.
When you have an unexpected stop or big jolt like hitting a curb too hard is when the five gallon bucket goes bad. Not much worse than picking fish up off the floor of the car and not having any water left to put them in!
Hope for the best and it works out better when you do the planning right.
 
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