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I have two African Dwarf Frogs in a 10 gallon tank and they leave a lot of blood worms and flakes left over (mainly because they can't find them) on the bottom. I wanted to get a plecostomus eventually, but I find they ignore a lot of the "leftovers" when I've had them before, so I was thinking a small catfish. Then maybe a couple of non-bottom-feeding fish later on. Anway, I have had a 10 gallon tank before with a couple of gouramis, a catfish, and a plecostomus, but I'm worried with the ADFs, that 4 bottom feeders in a 10 gallon tank is too much. Any suggestions?
 

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Honeycomb Master
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Small catfish? Have you seen honeycomb catfish (tatia perugiae) before?
I love these little guys. Definitely my favorite fish of all time. I have 7 of them in my 90g!
AND, they LOVE bloodworms... i have never seen mine ignore one if it floats past them.

Anyway, back to your question... i wouldn't add any more bottom feeders to your tank except for 1-2 honeycombs.
Most plecos aren't suitable for a 10g tank... you might be able to get away with 1 bristlenose, but that's kind of pushing it.
 

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I recommend an Exo Terra feeding dish or water dish. I'd put one in the corner of the tank burried in the gravel. As the frogs hunt around they will fall into the bowl where the food is, much cleaner than letting them hunt around in the gravel. Use a small tube, setting in the bowl and leaning against the glass, to guide the pellets or frozen bloodworms to the bowl. Keeping the food in one place keeps the tank cleaner like I mentioned and it saves money since you're using less food ;)
 

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I like using live blackworms. The leftovers just bury into the substrate and feed off the crud that floats to the bottom. They breed and provide an indefinite amount of food for my froggies.
 

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Small catfish? Have you seen honeycomb catfish (tatia perugiae) before?
I love these little guys. Definitely my favorite fish of all time. I have 7 of them in my 90g!
AND, they LOVE bloodworms... i have never seen mine ignore one if it floats past them.

Anyway, back to your question... i wouldn't add any more bottom feeders to your tank except for 1-2 honeycombs.
Most plecos aren't suitable for a 10g tank... you might be able to get away with 1 bristlenose, but that's kind of pushing it.

I don't remember what type of plecostomus I had, but I know Petsmart sells a "dwarf" species that they list as suitable for 10g+. I know they don't touch worms, so I imagine they would strictly eat algae and the occasional flake when needed. I wouldn't get one for a while until algae begins to grow in the tank. I'm just worried if they may become territorial with five other fish...three of those crowding the bottom.
 

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I recommend an Exo Terra feeding dish or water dish. I'd put one in the corner of the tank burried in the gravel. As the frogs hunt around they will fall into the bowl where the food is, much cleaner than letting them hunt around in the gravel. Use a small tube, setting in the bowl and leaning against the glass, to guide the pellets or frozen bloodworms to the bowl. Keeping the food in one place keeps the tank cleaner like I mentioned and it saves money since you're using less food ;)

Problem is the frozen bloodworms float and the filter blows the clump around the tank. I use a spoon to hold it in one place until it waterlogs and falls. Then the frogs fight over it (as ADF are famous for) and knock some of the worms around the tank and the "current" from the filter spreads it around. My ADFs aren't too bright so they tend to miss a lot of the leftover worms that drifted away. So not sure I could get the bloodworms onto the dish unless I hold them over it with the spoon until they waterlog. Hopefully they will land in the dish.
 

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If you do decide on catfish, IMO some dwarf cories would be the best size for a 10gal tank, if you can't find Tatias.

I'd recommend some Amano shrimp, but I've read some reports of ADFs eating them.

Yeah, my frogs ate two snails in their old tank, so I figured shrimp were out of the question. :p I can try ghost shrimp (since that is all I can seem to find in pet stores around here), since they are cheap, but I was under the impression you have to add a little bit of salt to the water...which makes me nervous.
 

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Fresh Fish Freak
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I don't remember what type of plecostomus I had, but I know Petsmart sells a "dwarf" species that they list as suitable for 10g+. I know they don't touch worms, so I imagine they would strictly eat algae and the occasional flake when needed. I wouldn't get one for a while until algae begins to grow in the tank. I'm just worried if they may become territorial with five other fish...three of those crowding the bottom.
There's no such thing as a Pleco species that is suitable for a 10gal tank- at least, none of the species commonly available. The smallest plecos currently in the hobby (bulldog, clown, bristle nosed, etc) still grow 4-6" and so really need at least 20gal, minimum, and that's if there are few other fish sharing the tank with them (ie- a breeding pair alone in a 20gal).

Take absolutely everything advertized and told to you by big box store employees with at least a grain of salt- there are a few who actually may know what they're talking about, but IME those are few and far between.

Ghost shrimp actually would be fine to try. There are many species sold as "ghost shrimp" and probably a few are brackish, but most are in fact freshwater shrimp and would do fine without any salt. I had a reproducing colony in my 46gal for several years at one point.
 

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I defrost a small chunk of bloodworms in the microwave for a few seconds and feed them to my frogs by hand via a pair of 12" tweezers. Works like a charm.
 

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There's no such thing as a Pleco species that is suitable for a 10gal tank- at least, none of the species commonly available. The smallest plecos currently in the hobby (bulldog, clown, bristle nosed, etc) still grow 4-6" and so really need at least 20gal, minimum, and that's if there are few other fish sharing the tank with them (ie- a breeding pair alone in a 20gal).

Take absolutely everything advertized and told to you by big box store employees with at least a grain of salt- there are a few who actually may know what they're talking about, but IME those are few and far between.

Ghost shrimp actually would be fine to try. There are many species sold as "ghost shrimp" and probably a few are brackish, but most are in fact freshwater shrimp and would do fine without any salt. I had a reproducing colony in my 46gal for several years at one point.

I dont normally argue with what Laura posts--but Ive personally got a 10g tank with a Pleco in it and have ZERO problems. It is a male BN Pleco and he is in the tank with 5 Leopard Corydoras and a male Betta. I havent had any issues at all. THAT SAID, my pleco is only about 3 inches long at this point and I plan to put him in one of my larger tanks when he grows a little.

Ive never had any frogs because I read about feeding issues and dont want that headache--so I cant give suggestions as it relates to the froggies.
 

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Anything that fits in a frogs mouth can be considered food. i think pygmy cories might fit. i know which pleco you are talking about not the common pleco but the rubber lip type at petsmart. they say the grow 8in. mine stayed under 4in but only seemed to like algae tablets. i think a couple full size cories or maybe 4 kulis loaches might work. i dont know if the frogs would bother them. they are fast, bury in the gravel and love blood worms.
 

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Problem is the frozen bloodworms float and the filter blows the clump around the tank. I use a spoon to hold it in one place until it waterlogs and falls. Then the frogs fight over it (as ADF are famous for) and knock some of the worms around the tank and the "current" from the filter spreads it around. My ADFs aren't too bright so they tend to miss a lot of the leftover worms that drifted away. So not sure I could get the bloodworms onto the dish unless I hold them over it with the spoon until they waterlog. Hopefully they will land in the dish.
Hmm, I guess my writing didn't explain the process well? :( Drop the frozen bloodworms into the tube that is placed at an angle in the bowl. As they thaw they will sink into the bowl. I use replacement undergravel filter uplift tubes, they're clear and you can easily see if all of the food has thawed and sunk.
 

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Hmm, I guess my writing didn't explain the process well? :( Drop the frozen bloodworms into the tube that is placed at an angle in the bowl. As they thaw they will sink into the bowl. I use replacement undergravel filter uplift tubes, they're clear and you can easily see if all of the food has thawed and sunk.

good idea! I will try that.
 
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