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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read Tom Barr's dry-start article in the current issue of FAMA. I understand the advantages for carpet plants like HC. For swords and crypts, the advantages are a little less clear to me. I assume that leaf dieback still occurs once water is added, but that regrowth is faster and in general more vigorous because a good root system has been established. Am I right, or am I missing something?
 

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I just read Tom Barr's dry-start article in the current issue of FAMA. I understand the advantages for carpet plants like HC. For swords and crypts, the advantages are a little less clear to me. I assume that leaf dieback still occurs once water is added, but that regrowth is faster and in general more vigorous because a good root system has been established. Am I right, or am I missing something?
Thats works for swords (Echinodorus) plants very well. I dont know crypts.
 

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I just read Tom Barr's dry-start article in the current issue of FAMA. I understand the advantages for carpet plants like HC. For swords and crypts, the advantages are a little less clear to me. I assume that leaf dieback still occurs once water is added, but that regrowth is faster and in general more vigorous because a good root system has been established. Am I right, or am I missing something?
Die back? I guess if you are using the submersed leaves, but most vendors sell you emergent grown plants for 95% of the aquatic plants grown commercially.

So it's not just for the carpeting plants, it can be used for most all species, Vals, Egeria, Hornwort etc, perhaps not, but few folks have issues with those anyway.

Once roots are established, the leaves will change depending on the species, but that will occur with a plant no matter what, this way the roots/bacteria/sediments are already established and adapted.

All the plant needs to do is rework the leaves some.

Many like the look of the Dry tank and just leave it, going to terrariums, adding frogs and what not. It's very easy and has a nice look by itself after all. Mosses, carnivorous plants are fun to work with there.

Lots of mosses are very easy to grow this way. Experimentally, it also gives you a non limiting CO2 reference for nutrients/sediments/lights etc.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mr. Barr, I am very glad to get a reply from the author! I suppose I was not clear enough in my original post. In the last few years I have learned that essentially all the rooted rosette plants like Swords and Crypts are grown emerse, and when placed underwater in a regular tank they lose their leaves only to grow back - hopefully - with submerse leaves. If I start these plants (grown as emerse plants) by the dry start method, then submerge them, I expect them to lose their leaves, just as if I'd bought them in a pet store and immediately submerged them in a tank. So, if I start my plants your way and allow them to develop a strong root system before being submerged, will the new, submerged growth develop quicker and more robustly? Is there a definite advantage to growing Swords, Sag, and Crypts this way? Thanks in advance.
 

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So, if I start my plants your way and allow them to develop a strong root system before being submerged, will the new, submerged growth develop quicker and more robustly? Is there a definite advantage to growing Swords, Sag, and Crypts this way? Thanks in advance.
Yes, that was the point in the debate:thumbsup:
They do not need to allocate resources to also growing all new root systems.

It also gets things growing well prior to algae colonization.
Moss and other plants without sediment attached roots can be used and grown terrarium style for a long time , then flood the tank.

This will still help allow the plants to adapt to the conditions in your tank, temp, moving,/transport, different lighting etc.

Also reduces any O2 stress on the plants, a huge issue and allows them to build up 1/2 of their organs in the sediment 1st, before dealing with the leaves.

Some species grow roots really fast and some are slower growing, but invest more resources into the roots/tubers/rhizomes etc for long term survival, storage. Either way, the plant will be better off.

I typically just pack the tank full of plants unless I want a large carpet through. Or if I lack enough plants to do the job and can wait for the filling of the tank.

I think it's got some serious trade offs, but it's a useful tool for many styles and carpeting plants to get them going well prior.

Can be applied to wider range, but most are too impatient, can do fine with dither plants till they have the others grow in. I do both methods myself.

Did not help once I put my plecos in though, they torn up the HC right away even when it was well rooted and growing well:frown:
So I had to chose another species and the tank was full of fish by then.

Hard to go back or if you only have one tank, no other extra tanks for fish, tank breakdown etc available.

Big trade off there.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, Mr. Barr. I have no fish right now, and am setting up 3 tanks from scratch - plants are the main thing. So I have no problem with time. One more question: about how long should it take for plants to become established this way, assuming Echinodorus - Sagittaria - Cryptocoryne are the three main genera (not necesssarily the same tank)?
 
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