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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! I have a shrimp tank with a set heater bringing the temperature up to 73.4f/23C, and I’ve been told by some to remove the heater (not sure how to do this without shocking the shrimp), which would bring the tank down to my room temp of 66f/19C.

this is a new tank, that I have had a few issues with, with around 12 red cherries, and I’m not sure which option to choose, as both are apparently in the ideal range…
 

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Hi all! I have a shrimp tank with a set heater bringing the temperature up to 73.4f/23C, and I’ve been told by some to remove the heater (not sure how to do this without shocking the shrimp), which would bring the tank down to my room temp of 66f/19C.

this is a new tank, that I have had a few issues with, with around 12 red cherries, and I’m not sure which option to choose, as both are apparently in the ideal range…
You were told by me that you don't need a heater for your shrimp. You won't shock them by removing the heater.

19c is fine.

The dwarf freshwater shrimp you're keeping are cool water species. Feel free to use the search function here on the forum, read through some of thousands of posts in the Shrimp section and check out some Tank Journals. You'll see heaters are unnecessary in most cases.
 

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Hi all! I have a shrimp tank with a set heater bringing the temperature up to 73.4f/23C, and I’ve been told by some to remove the heater (not sure how to do this without shocking the shrimp), which would bring the tank down to my room temp of 66f/19C.

this is a new tank, that I have had a few issues with, with around 12 red cherries, and I’m not sure which option to choose, as both are apparently in the ideal range…
I too was recommended to remove my heater. I have Crystal Red Shrimp and the water is staying around 67 with a glass lid. During summer I use a fan and remove the lid and it stays around 69.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You were told by me that you don't need a heater for your shrimp. You won't shock them by removing the heater.

19c is fine.

The dwarf freshwater shrimp you're keeping are cool water species. Feel free to use the search function here on the forum, read through some of thousands of posts in the Shrimp section and check out some Tank Journals. You'll see heaters are unnecessary in most cases.
thanks for all your help. I’ve been reading up as you suggested, and you’re right- everything I read said they will live at 66, however everything I saw regarding the perfect temperature said something far closer to what my tank is at- low 70s. Looking at the climate of Taiwan I can see that this would simulate months of April through to May, and October to late November, whereas 66 would be more like late November to early May. For my own peace of mind I’ve decided to keep the heater, but I’m sure that all your shrimp are thriving too, and thanks for the help on other areas.
 

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thanks for all your help. I’ve been reading up as you suggested, and you’re right- everything I read said they will live at 66, however everything I saw regarding the perfect temperature said something far closer to what my tank is at- low 70s. Looking at the climate of Taiwan I can see that this would simulate months of April through to May, and October to late November, whereas 66 would be more like late November to early May. For my own peace of mind I’ve decided to keep the heater, but I’m sure that all your shrimp are thriving too, and thanks for the help on other areas.
My shrimp are thriving because I've kept them for more than 30 years and have the benefit of having access to collective knowledge on the internet. And because I've been to China, Taiwan and throughout Asia where Neocaridina and Caridina species are found in the wild.

No one with experience is going to tell you to use a heater unless your temperatures are regularly lower than the high 50s Fahrenheit. They're just not necessary. Because shrimp are from cool water streams and pools, often protected by plant growth overhead and covered in leaf litter. In other words, the water is a lot cooler than the terrestrial environment.

Your shrimp will be fine in water than's 73-74. But they'll do better in cooler temps. Their lifespans will be longer, they'll grow at a more reasonable rate and they'll be exposed to fewer pathogens than they would be in warmer water. That's what we know from collective experience.

If you want to do what's best for your shrimp, keep reading and learning. Try never to make decisions about their care without knowledge. Your critters will thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My shrimp are thriving because I've kept them for more than 30 years and have the benefit of having access to collective knowledge on the internet. And because I've been to China, Taiwan and throughout Asia where Neocaridina and Caridina species are found in the wild.

No one with experience is going to tell you to use a heater unless your temperatures are regularly lower than the high 50s Fahrenheit. They're just not necessary. Because shrimp are from cool water streams and pools, often protected by plant growth overhead and covered in leaf litter. In other words, the water is a lot cooler than the terrestrial environment.

Your shrimp will be fine in water than's 73-74. But they'll do better in cooler temps. Their lifespans will be longer, they'll grow at a more reasonable rate and they'll be exposed to fewer pathogens than they would be in warmer water. That's what we know from collective experience.

If you want to do what's best for your shrimp, keep reading and learning. Try never to make decisions about their care without knowledge. Your critters will thank you.
Ok, I think I’ll keep the heater on while I’m on holiday, and then turn it off- but I ask- will they breed at 66?
 
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