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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
AS some of you know im begining to accumulate everything for a 150 set up
72x18x28 I want this to be very clean looking so everything will be plumbed and as much hidden as possible-- should I bulk head the tank I want 2 inlets and 2 outlets for two canisters or will be spilting a big one. I dont think I want overflows like in a reef tank--But Ill take any suggestions you may have Bruce:biggrin:
 

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I would recommend two intakes and two return via 4 holes. That is how mine is setup and works well. I would recommend either putting your returns up higher in the tank or using some power heads to break teh surface water. I use 4 Hydor Koralias hooked to a wave maker for my surface movement.

Craig
 

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If you do an internet search for something like "aquarium canister drilled" you will get quite a few opinions that canisters should not be run on drilled tanks since the pressure exerted on the seals can cause them to fail.

However, some people are of the opinion that this is not the case. Craigthor and Wasserpest come to mind. I certainly respect their opinion, and they obviously have experience with larger tanks. I am giving some thought to having my next tank, a six footer, predrilled.

If you look at this thread, there is some discussion and some links that you might find useful.
 

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My 40G has bulkhead fittings but that was because it was originally placed in an area where nothing could passover the back rim of the tank (was custom built to fit in an alcove between two shelves).
TBH i will have my next tank fitted with bulkheads as well as they add a clean look to the back area of the tank rim (I hate stuff climbing over the rims of tanks) also if you colour match the bulkheads to the background they disappear. also most custom tank builders can drill any holes you need during the build stage (helps if you give them the actual bulkheads you will be useing)
In your case i would go for two in and two out as craigthor suggested (primeing a split in/out can be a pig to do) that way one filter can be purly for filtration (FX5 or such the like) and the other can be a heated filter (Eheim Pro3 or similar) thus eliminating the need for inline heaters
 

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Hi Bruce. For my 75, I will be running two canisters. There will be an internal overflow running the length of the tank rear with two holes drilled appx 4" down for the canisters. Returns will go to two spray bars located across the rear bottom. These will feed in from over the top, I'm worried about drilling them in because I may want to relocate them if water movement is not right. This setup will give good movement ( I hope ). The skimming action on top should be gentle enough as to not cause a loss of co2.
 

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wont i lose a lot of co2 with a lot of surface disturbance?
This is not really an applicable statement for this setup. This "argument" is typically associated with sump setups (which are typically setup with drill tanks and bulkheads). The argument stands on the premise that the surface agitation that is typical of the sump style trickle filters and such, if left uncovered, will off gas the CO2. This does not apply to all sump setups and really is one of those myths that has been driven by misinterpretation and regurgitated over and over again without any basis.

You'll be fine with canister filters off of bulkheads.

If you do an internet search for something like "aquarium canister drilled" you will get quite a few opinions that canisters should not be run on drilled tanks since the pressure exerted on the seals can cause them to fail.

However, some people are of the opinion that this is not the case. Craigthor and Wasserpest come to mind. I certainly respect their opinion, and they obviously have experience with larger tanks. I am giving some thought to having my next tank, a six footer, predrilled.

If you look at this thread, there is some discussion and some links that you might find useful.
Add me to that list as well.
 

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While it's easy enough to drill the tank and install bulkhead fittings, and run a canister filter from them, you have the downside of not being able to easily change anything one you setup the tank.

What I would do would be to plumb the tank with either gray or black, rigid PVC pipe, and use ball valves and hose barbs, so you can connect this to you canister filter using normal tubing.

This way the dark pipe isn't an eyesore, but you can change it rather easily, although you will need to cut the pipe, and re glue it the way you want. By using the valves, you can easily remove the canister for service.
 

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While it's easy enough to drill the tank and install bulkhead fittings, and run a canister filter from them, you have the downside of not being able to easily change anything one you setup the tank.

What I would do would be to plumb the tank with either gray or black, rigid PVC pipe, and use ball valves and hose barbs, so you can connect this to you canister filter using normal tubing.

This way the dark pipe isn't an eyesore, but you can change it rather easily, although you will need to cut the pipe, and re glue it the way you want. By using the valves, you can easily remove the canister for service.
Excellent advice. I second all of the above. Looking into the future and considering maintenance is very important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wow I guess I feel asleep at this thread all good ideas---I didnt know you could get a heated filter--thanks robowall
Dave K --You mean use some type of fitting to go through the bottom of the tank I thought thats what a bulkhead was I guess I still need some Bulkhead 101
 

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This is not really an applicable statement for this setup. This "argument" is typically associated with sump setups (which are typically setup with drill tanks and bulkheads). The argument stands on the premise that the surface agitation that is typical of the sump style trickle filters and such, if left uncovered, will off gas the CO2. This does not apply to all sump setups and really is one of those myths that has been driven by misinterpretation and regurgitated over and over again without any basis.
He was replying to this though:

"I would recommend two intakes and two return via 4 holes. That is how mine is setup and works well. I would recommend either putting your returns up higher in the tank or using some power heads to break teh surface water. I use 4 Hydor Koralias hooked to a wave maker for my surface movement.

Craig"
 

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Is there any danger in getting a heater in the filter what if it goes bad?
I have used Ehiem heated filters for a few years now (first was a pro 2224 and now a Pro3 2173) and have never had any problems.
but if you dont want to go that route you can always use the hydor inline heaters if you like (i assume you would need to remember to switch them off for filter cleaning with he eheim you HAVE to unplug it to remove the canister).
to see if its worthwhile for you check out the price of a heated filter and then compare it to the cost of a filter and an inline heater, which ever is cheapest go for it, they will both work well
 
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