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To all those who like green shrimp

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Heptacarpus pictus

Yep, you guessed it. Saltwater. But pretty just the same. :)Thank you google pics. heh
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· Opae Ula Crazed.
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Ah... Ummm. There's nothing wrong with saltwater. :-D

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Saltwater is no harder than freshwater, especially when dealing with shrimp - you're doing the same water care essentially with RO water and such. The 'hard' part people associate to saltwater is the upfront cost to get a setup going. Nothing different from freshwater shrimp care and saltwater care outside of price at that point (imo)


The care people put in to their shrimp tanks n this forum are above and beyond what many saltwater keepers I known do.
 

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I know from personal experience that saltwater isn't any harder. It is definitely more expensive to get all of the equipment. You can get by with a good amount of live rock, some powerheads, and a good protein skimmer though. The water parameters will be different than freshwater, but certainly not more difficult. The best way I know to set up a saltwater tank (especially easy if you are only planning to keep inverts) is to do a deep sand bed. Starting with dry sand and dead rock will help to mitigate the usual startup pests (i.e. bristle worms, fire worms, cyanobacterial blooms, hair algae, etc.) and is cheaper than the live stuff. The only downside is that starting with dry sand and dead rock makes the cycling process take longer, but this can be sped along with something like Dr. Tim's One and Only or a similar product. I wish I had taken this route, it would have saved me quite a few headaches.
Macroalgaes make for a nice "planted saltwater" look. I have feather caulerpa algae in my sw tank.
 

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68 is nothing a few fans can't handle most of the year. I am planning a saltwater tank in a couple years once my kid gets older and im not out of town for work all the time. I think a big cost of sw is lighting but if you just do a shallow tank i cant imagine it would be too terrible. I have seen some pretty awesome 12 long set ups.
 

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I run both FW plants, shrimp and reef. I get into fun discussions with the shop that does my tank sitting regarding FW vs SW. Most reefers think planted tanks are much more difficult. At the end of the day, it is all about water chemistry, especially for shrimp, planted tanks and reefs. A solid understanding of water chemistry goes a long way in the success in aquariums. RO plus chemicals divided by testing = smart successful hobbyist.
 

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Saltwater is no harder than freshwater, especially when dealing with shrimp - you're doing the same water care essentially with RO water and such. The 'hard' part people associate to saltwater is the upfront cost to get a setup going. Nothing different from freshwater shrimp care and saltwater care outside of price at that point (imo)


The care people put in to their shrimp tanks n this forum are above and beyond what many saltwater keepers I known do.
Realistically that's not true. If you properly do both freshwater and saltwater, saltwater is by far the expensive one and requires a little bit of knowledge to get deeper more into the hobby.
 

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The lighting would only be a cost issue if you plan to keep photosynthetic corals. Nothing else really depends on the light.
I would only do a 12 long if you've got a good sized sump for it. Most experienced SW folks usually don't do anything that small because the water parameters can change very quickly and have disastrous results. A larger volume helps to provide a buffer zone.
 
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