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5 assorted fancy guppies in a 10-gallon tank!
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Discussion Starter #21
Man, 2 of my guppies died yesterday :(

My yellow cobra guppy died from a broken back (I don't know what caused it), and one of my smaller assorted male guppies died from old age :(
 

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This is why I asked- I just started on this forum and haven't had the time to read up on everyone's stocklist.

I looked into archers about 20 years ago (jeez time flies) and was specifically discouraged from keeping them because "they will starve if you don't have an enclosed palludarium with live insects" and "you need over 100 gallons so they have enough room to bolt and jump". I was also told that because they live in tributaries and often swim into ocean inlets that I'd have to go brackish. I'd taken spotted and figure 8 puffers from freshwater to saltwater successfully at the time but was not interested in another version of transition.

Again, I know I keep rubbing you the wrong way, and I'm very sorry for that. Thank you so much for answering my question. Archers are truly beautiful fish!!
ah yes, the "golden years" of fishkeeping hahaha. I don't blame you. An old salt when I was a child 10+ years ago at my first fish club meeting was like "you have to feed seahorses with live brine shrimp" [at the time, internet was pointing towards training them onto frozen mysis, and still does today].

But nah, you don't need a palludarium. You can certainly supplement with live insects but they're not required (FD crickets are almost the same as live crickets anyways). As for jumping, archers are like arowanas: they curl up in order to jump so don't need a lot of space. For bolting, as long as the fish has a decent amount of space, it'll be fine (they do have front facing eyes and can see the glass). So a 29 is sufficient for an archer. It's true that some species of archers do need brackish water, but that's literally just adding ~1-2 tablespoons per gallon (approximately, I can't remember the exact concentrations) or so of salt when doing water changes (you don't even have to use RODI water!), but no need to fluctuate the salinity. I believe there's one species that is fully freshwater but can't remember what it's name is.
 

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ah yes, the "golden years" of fishkeeping hahaha. I don't blame you. An old salt when I was a child 10+ years ago at my first fish club meeting was like "you have to feed seahorses with live brine shrimp" [at the time, internet was pointing towards training them onto frozen mysis, and still does today].

But nah, you don't need a palludarium. You can certainly supplement with live insects but they're not required (FD crickets are almost the same as live crickets anyways). As for jumping, archers are like arowanas: they curl up in order to jump so don't need a lot of space. For bolting, as long as the fish has a decent amount of space, it'll be fine (they do have front facing eyes and can see the glass). So a 29 is sufficient for an archer. It's true that some species of archers do need brackish water, but that's literally just adding ~1-2 tablespoons per gallon (approximately, I can't remember the exact concentrations) or so of salt when doing water changes (you don't even have to use RODI water!), but no need to fluctuate the salinity. I believe there's one species that is fully freshwater but can't remember what it's name is.
Gosh darn it all... Now I want any archer!! 😆😆😆👍👍👍 awesome info, thank you so much!!!! And yes, I'm an old timer just getting back into the swing of things lol
 

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5 assorted fancy guppies in a 10-gallon tank!
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Discussion Starter #27
So, to summarize:

I could either:
  1. Get a bigger tank
  2. Get predator fish that will keep the guppy population to a controlled amount
  3. Get another tank for them to be housed in?
 

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Kind of- that's the thing with guppies- they are going to breed and over populated just about any place that you have males and females breeding unchecked. If you want to keep both males and females I would suggest doing it in separate tanks and if you want to try breeding for just a couple broods isolate a couple males and a female and watch them for a few days, make sure they've bred and then release them back into their separated tanks. It's a lot easier to control your population that way and still get the joys of breeding without the fear of complete overpopulation.
 

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Basically yes. However, some predators will also eat the adult guppies so do your research beforehand on what fish you want to buy. I recommend getting fish capable of eating adult guppies since they'll most likely also eat juveniles as well. The archerfish and knight goby I recommended will eat adult guppies no questions asked (much to 12 year old me's chagrin).
 

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5 assorted fancy guppies in a 10-gallon tank!
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Discussion Starter #30
However, I don't want the adults to die ._.
 

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However, I don't want the adults to die ._.
Smaller mouthed predators (betta, dwarf gourami, rams or larger bodied tetra etc) can help with taking out fry but are too small to eat adults. If you separate males from females and keep up with it as fry are born it will be a long process and you will still have to find a way to thin the population throughout the separation process, but if you can find a way to cull a few broods, you should be able to sort your current population out throughout the course of a few months. You'll possibly have a few females spit out a few fry here and there, but it shouldn't be as bad and you won't have to take on anymore stock as it seems as though you are kind of set against it. It's not going to be easy, but it's definitely not impossible. I'm just glad my hubby loves turtles and ours keep the guppy colonies under control.
 

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5 assorted fancy guppies in a 10-gallon tank!
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Discussion Starter #33
The last thing I need is another fish in the tank! One new fish died today for some unknown reason, & another one of the males is being treated for ich. My tank's water is a bit cloudy, and I"m starting to think my tank is going to crash. What should I do?
 

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Any time I've had random fish deaths (more than 1), I go through a checklist of the fastest things I can fix, and go from one to the next until everyone is safe...

1.) Make sure you have good surface agitation and O2 saturation, make sure your CO2 isn't too high. Make sure the water temperature is correct.
2.) Perform a 50% water change, and test the water for Ammonia and Nitrite. If your tests register any readable amount of either, skip to step 4.
3.) Do a good, deep filter cleaning, using aquarium water. Change out any filter pads, but reuse any bio media. Clean your hoses while you're here.
4.) Make sure your water is PERFECT. Zero ammonia, Zero Nitrite, <10 Nitrate. If you have any ammonia or nitrite, that needs to be addressed ASAP. Dose Prime after your water change, and continue to do 30% water changes every day, dasing Prime as you go. Continue this until ammonia and nitrite read zero.
5.) Raise tank temp to highest your fish will tolerate, and dose aquarium salt to half recommended amount.
6.) If fish are still dying, you need to figure out of it's parasitic or bacterial. Most Fungal infections start as either parasitic or bacterial, so treat for the parasite or bacteria.

You should be able to do steps 1-3 in an hour. Step 4 is either skipped, or could take weeks. The good news, is that if you need step 4, it should fix the dying fish problem. If you have an illness in the tank, it could be a simple fix, or it could decimate the tank, depending on what it is. I've had a horrible ich outbreak that looked like it was going to wipe out the tank, but was fixed in 2 days. I've also had a Columnaris outbreak that killed 1 or 2 fish a week, and didn't stop until everything was dead, despite me trying everything.
 
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