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5 assorted fancy guppies in a 10-gallon tank!
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, does anyone have any tips as to how to manage an overstocked guppy aquarium? I have a total of 17 guppies in my main 10-gallon tank, and 18 guppy fry in a 3.5-gallon tank. Help and advice ould be greatly appreciated!
 

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Are you looking to get rid of them, sell them, or continue keeping them?
 

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Separate males from females. Only keep the males in your 10 gallon. Put they female(s) with the fry and try to get rid of them lot of them. Guppies won't really eat their babies so you're going to be over run if you keep females. You can try unloading them on a lfs or maybe even a box store if you can't find somebody that wants them. Just don't flush them.
 

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5 assorted fancy guppies in a 10-gallon tank!
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Discussion Starter #4
I'm looking into selling some of my males, as my male to female ratio in my tank is completely off. The rest of the fish, I'm going to continue to keep. I just didn't know what to do with so many fish (my mind can't turn down a pretty guppy when I see one and almost instantly snatch it up).

And I can't find a single LFS near me that will take them off my hands for anything in return :(
 

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And I can't find a single LFS near me that will take them off my hands for anything in return :(
You might have to just gives them away... I strongly advise not keeping females as there really isn't a make to female ratio for guppies unless you are intentionally trying to breed them and they can continue to drop babies even without males present for a year. If you do plan to keep your female you will absolutely need to find a way to unload them or you will be over run.
 

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What state r u at lots of ppl around here in AL trade and buy fish
 

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And I can't find a single LFS near me that will take them off my hands for anything in return :(
Yeah, you may just need to give them away. A lot of LFS will give you store credit, or just buy something on the same trip that you "donate" them fish, and you'll get a discount. It's better to give them away than it is to overstock your tanks and kill them with poor conditions.
 

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What state r u at lots of ppl around here in AL trade and buy fish
I'm in new england, they do here too, but unless you have some VERY fancy line bred guppies hardly anybody is interested. Livebearers are very hard to unload unless you know people that use them as feeders on a large scale. Please never flush your fish. I know it sounds like I'm pulling this from nowhere, but if you're over run with Livebearers it's easy to contemplate flushing them. Please do not do this!! If you must please kill them. Yes, flushing them will probably kill them- but what if it doesn't? Please don't risk making a hobby fish into an invasive species or we won't have a hobby anymore- look at herp keepers in Florida...
 

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5 assorted fancy guppies in a 10-gallon tank!
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Discussion Starter #9
OH NO! I would never consider flushing them! I'm just over-run by males rn and I need to get rid of some! I might be getting a larger tank and all somewhere in the near future. My fish don't breed much unless they're in warmer water. And for the record, I live in AZ.
 

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If you have a shady spot in your yard, make a cheap pond with a plastic storage tub or one of those huge garden buckets from home depot. Put the unwanted guppies out there with a large goldfish or a cichlid or two...
 

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5 assorted fancy guppies in a 10-gallon tank!
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If you have a shady spot in your yard, make a cheap pond with a plastic storage tub or one of those huge garden buckets from home depot. Put the unwanted guppies out there with a large goldfish or a cichlid or two...
O_O
 

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Or alternatively, do the whole summer tubbing thing with the cheap 17 gallon buckets. Separate the males into their own bin, and let them swim around and get fat and colorful on mosquito larvae and sunlight. Toss the adult females into another bin, and remove fry (i.e. not the original females) every month. Then use the 10 gallon indoors as a rapid growout. Or toss the fry from every month into a different bucket and start sexing them out after the second month.

That does sound like a lot of work. Knight Goby and archerfish combo?

And to answer your original question: do lots of frequent water changes, have a lot of plants, aerate the water heavily. This keeps nitrogen wastes down, helps keep the water quality up, and keeps hte fish from utilizing too much oxygen in the tank.
 

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5 assorted fancy guppies in a 10-gallon tank!
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Discussion Starter #13
Or alternatively, do the whole summer tubbing thing with the cheap 17 gallon buckets. Separate the males into their own bin, and let them swim around and get fat and colorful on mosquito larvae and sunlight. Toss the adult females into another bin, and remove fry (i.e. not the original females) every month. Then use the 10 gallon indoors as a rapid growout. Or toss the fry from every month into a different bucket and start sexing them out after the second month.

That does sound like a lot of work. Knight Goby and archerfish combo?

And to answer your original question: do lots of frequent water changes, have a lot of plants, aerate the water heavily. This keeps nitrogen wastes down, helps keep the water quality up, and keeps hte fish from utilizing too much oxygen in the tank.
Sounds like a good idea, but I'm scared that birds might swoop down and eat the guppies :(
 

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Or alternatively, do the whole summer tubbing thing with the cheap 17 gallon buckets. Separate the males into their own bin, and let them swim around and get fat and colorful on mosquito larvae and sunlight. Toss the adult females into another bin, and remove fry (i.e. not the original females) every month. Then use the 10 gallon indoors as a rapid growout. Or toss the fry from every month into a different bucket and start sexing them out after the second month.

That does sound like a lot of work. Knight Goby and archerfish combo?

And to answer your original question: do lots of frequent water changes, have a lot of plants, aerate the water heavily. This keeps nitrogen wastes down, helps keep the water quality up, and keeps hte fish from utilizing too much oxygen in the tank.
Quick question- why do you keep suggesting archerfish to people with tiny aquariums? You know the minimum requirement for archer fish is 100 gallons and they require very specific care, which I'm 100% certain people that are upset over a couple extra brood of guppies in their 10 gallon/ 20 gallon aren't ready to handle? Honest question- I don't know if you know something I don't about archers.
 

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My dads had no trouble getting rid of guppies he sold 4 adult for like 20 $
 

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My dads had no trouble getting rid of guppies he sold 4 adult for like 20 $
That really depends on where you live. If you have 50 local fish stores within driving distance, you can find one that will buy fish. If you live just south of Nowhere and you have 1 chain store that's 60 miles away, it's more difficult to sell fish, especially fry.
 

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That really depends on where you live. If you have 50 local fish stores within driving distance, you can find one that will buy fish. If you live just south of Nowhere and you have 1 chain store that's 60 miles away, it's more difficult to sell fish, especially fry.
I can 100% vouche for this.
 

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Quick question- why do you keep suggesting archerfish to people with tiny aquariums? You know the minimum requirement for archer fish is 100 gallons and they require very specific care, which I'm 100% certain people that are upset over a couple extra brood of guppies in their 10 gallon/ 20 gallon aren't ready to handle? Honest question- I don't know if you know something I don't about archers.
Yeah uhh, given that I’ve kept archerfish for a few years, I can attest that you can keep a single individual in a 29 gallon tank (something I know I’ve mentioned before but didn’t mention in this specific thread). Aside from adding a bit of marine salt into the water for certain species (not all require brackish) they do well off of freeze dried krill and bloodworms which are easy to find. None of that is specialty care to me anymore.

Of the many fish that could work as guppy eaters, archers are the ones I favor most at the moment. This is because they’re relatively inexpensive, match the parameters you can successfully keep guppies in, and can be kept in a tank with a small footprint.

There are of course other options, but ones I don’t think work as well. Angels will eat fry, but they’re more of a softwater fish, and will only eat fry and not subadults. Pike cichlids will eat both fry and subadults, but require a riverine setup (lots of oxygen, etc), and the smaller ones are incredibly pricey. Pim cats need a 50 gallon footprint given how fast they can swim regardless of how small they are. So on and so forth.
 

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Yeah uhh, given that I’ve kept archerfish for a few years, I can attest that you can keep a single individual in a 29 gallon tank (something I know I’ve mentioned before but didn’t mention in this specific thread). Aside from adding a bit of marine salt into the water for certain species (not all require brackish) they do well off of freeze dried krill and bloodworms which are easy to find. None of that is specialty care to me anymore.

Of the many fish that could work as guppy eaters, archers are the ones I favor most at the moment. This is because they’re relatively inexpensive, match the parameters you can successfully keep guppies in, and can be kept in a tank with a small footprint.

There are of course other options, but ones I don’t think work as well. Angels will eat fry, but they’re more of a softwater fish, and will only eat fry and not subadults. Pike cichlids will eat both fry and subadults, but require a riverine setup (lots of oxygen, etc), and the smaller ones are incredibly pricey. Pim cats need a 50 gallon footprint given how fast they can swim regardless of how small they are. So on and so forth.
This is why I asked- I just started on this forum and haven't had the time to read up on everyone's stocklist.

I looked into archers about 20 years ago (jeez time flies) and was specifically discouraged from keeping them because "they will starve if you don't have an enclosed palludarium with live insects" and "you need over 100 gallons so they have enough room to bolt and jump". I was also told that because they live in tributaries and often swim into ocean inlets that I'd have to go brackish. I'd taken spotted and figure 8 puffers from freshwater to saltwater successfully at the time but was not interested in another version of transition.

Again, I know I keep rubbing you the wrong way, and I'm very sorry for that. Thank you so much for answering my question. Archers are truly beautiful fish!!
 
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