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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a bag of red Flourite and found out that is is very dirty, I mean very dirty! And I donot see the justification for the price and doubt it benifits, despite of many people here claim otherwise. Here is why.

1. It is just crushed shale and slate, both are mud stone, with the latter under higher pressure in the sidimentation process so it is harder and more stable, and basically inert and no benificial to plants.
2. The shale may have some benifits to plants, it is basically dried mud. But it will slowly dissolve in water, and that is why it is so dirty. You will be better off by using regular gravel plus some dirt from your back yard. It is a lot cheaper.
3. It is too coarse, up to 1/4 inch in size, and too sharply angled, not good to the root.
4. There is no special treatment to the crushed rock, no additional added benifit, no justification for the high cost.

The Floramax is basically the same materials, but crushed and graded to a much finer size, and is much cheaper. IMHO, it is much better value.

Other than AS that is specially manufactured substrate for planted tank, all the crushed rock should be treated the same, crushed rock. And they are no better than natural gravle and sand. One exception is crushed and properly graded lava rock. Their porosity has been proven to be benifitial.

Anyway, Flourite is crushed slate and shale, poorly graded, dirty, and over priced, ordinary substrate, no better than any properly graded oridinary gravel and sand.
 

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1. It is just crushed shale and slate, both are mud stone, with the latter under higher pressure in the sidimentation process so it is harder and more stable, and basically inert and no benificial to plants.
It is hardened clay and has a high CEC, unlike sand for example.

2. The shale may have some benifits to plants, it is basically dried mud. But it will slowly dissolve in water, and that is why it is so dirty. You will be better off by using regular gravel plus some dirt from your back yard. It is a lot cheaper.
It does not disolve in water. I am using it for more than one year. It is dirty i did rinse it the first time I used it. Regular gravel does not have CEC, but many people claim have success with gravel. Personally I mix sand and flourite.

3. It is too coarse, up to 1/4 inch in size, and too sharply angled, not good to the root.
My red flourite is 2-3mm in size, I find it the right size but not the best for corydoras fishes.

Michel.
 

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It is hardened clay and has a high CEC, unlike sand for example.



It does not disolve in water. I am using it for more than one year. It is dirty i did rinse it the first time I used it. Regular gravel does not have CEC, but many people claim have success with gravel. Personally I mix sand and flourite.



My red flourite is 2-3mm in size, I find it the right size but not the best for corydoras fishes.

Michel.
+one , Flourite is iron enriched clay (flourite red).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is not specially treated or anything, just crushed natural rocks. BAsed on my assessment, BTW, I'm a minrologist by training, it is just slate, hard, dense, and inert, mixed with shale, relative soft, and may break down.

The size I have is just too coarse, and it is too sharp. If you got the right size, good for you. At least they have poor QC from batch to batch.

As far as CEC goes, I just don't see what in there can provide that, not the slate, which is the majority, may be some shale, but limited. Talking about CEC, the flourite stuff is far inferiou that crushed lava, especially red lava, very rich in iron too.

Can it be used in planted tank, sure. Is it justified for the money, NO!

I know people own it and used it will say otehrwise, but this is just my 2 cents.
 

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I have it my 90g and it's about 3-4" thick. My plants love it and I never fertilize except for the occasional root tab for new plants.
It is dirty and took me a long time to rinse it but it is worth it. My Cory's and khuli loaches don't seem to mind it either.
 

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It is not specially treated or anything, just crushed natural rocks. BAsed on my assessment, BTW, I'm a minrologist by training, it is just slate, hard, dense, and inert, mixed with shale, relative soft, and may break down.

The size I have is just too coarse, and it is too sharp. If you got the right size, good for you. At least they have poor QC from batch to batch.

As far as CEC goes, I just don't see what in there can provide that, not the slate, which is the majority, may be some shale, but limited. Talking about CEC, the flourite stuff is far inferiou that crushed lava, especially red lava, very rich in iron too.

Can it be used in planted tank, sure. Is it justified for the money, NO!

I know people own it and used it will say otehrwise, but this is just my 2 cents.
You can't even spell mineralologist,I have doubt's as to your conclusion's.
Product is calcined clay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You can't even spell mineralologist,I have doubt's as to your conclusion's.
Product is calcined clay.
So what, in the rush of things.
Anyway, you like it, fine. I just don't think it is worth the money, period. I didn't say it is not working, just not justified for the price. That's all. It is too dirty to use.
 

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That dust is arguably the best part of the product. I wouldn't rinse it at all if I used it, much like how I use STS. It is a clay product, mostly aluminum.

http://www.seachem.com/Products/product_pages/FlouriteRed.html

In the rush of things? You had all the time in the world to compose your rant.

On top of that, you would have known it was dirty if you did any research on the product. Go buy eco-complete if you want something clean and no fuss.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Don't be fooled by the chemical analysis. It is more important what can dissolve in water, at what rate, not what is in there. Look at a chemical analysis of granite, very balanced, why no one is promote it as plant growth substrate? It is inert.

Agreed on the washing part, the goodies may be in the fine particles. Wash it off, waste money.
 

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Wheeling you sound more like someone who is frustrated and that is against a product or wants to vent. You may find it pricey, you may hate it is your opinion. But, you should not send false information about the product.

But you do not really know what flourite is, first you called this chrushed shale and slate, then you say it is dried mud, non sense is this talking.

http://www.seachem.com/Products/product_pages/Flourite.html

Flourite® is a specially fracted, stable porous clay gravel for the natural planted aquarium.


We say that after a rinse dirty particles goes out and that it will not cloud water but you do not seem to be in a mood to understand. Wait a couple of days, let the fire in your head goes down, please.

Michel.
 

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Ok, Wheeling....

I don't claim to have any credentials on anything. That said, I'm open to hear your ideas. Surely you've studied the composition of not only the granules, but of the "powder", yes?

Maybe you can help us save money and shut down this excessive exploitation of aquarium hobbyists! How can we recreate the product for less money?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wheeling you sound more like someone who is frustrated and that is bitching against a product or wants to vent. You may find it pricey, you may hate it is your opinion. But, you should not send false information about the product.

But you do not really know what flourite is, first you called this chrushed shale and slate, then you say it is dried mud, non sense is this talking.

http://www.seachem.com/Products/product_pages/Flourite.html

Flourite® is a specially fracted, stable porous clay gravel for the natural planted aquarium.

We say that after a rinse dirty particles goes out and that it will not cloud water but you do not seem to be in a mood to understand. Wait a couple of days, let the fire in your head goes down, please.

Michel.
Read my original post, you will know what a dried mud is. Are you a representative of the producer? HOw many rinse I have to do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ok, Wheeling....

I don't claim to have any credentials on anything. That said, I'm open to hear your ideas. Surely you've studied the composition of not only the granules, but of the "powder", yes?

Maybe you can help us save money and shut down this excessive exploitation of aquarium hobbyists! How can we recreate the product for less money?
You like the product, you use it, that is fine. I don't like it and I'm stuck with it. As a consumer, I have my right to voice my dispointment, I don't think it is worth the money, period. If you have the time to develope a new product, go ahead. I'll give it a first try.
 

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I bought a metal colander and just ran water through it from my water hose for a few minutes then put it in my tank. It was easy to do. It took awhile since I did a little at a time. I think it is great and worth every penny I paid for it. I have about 8 bags in total in my tank. There are cheaper products but you get what you pay for.
 

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1. It is just crushed shale and slate, both are mud stone, with the latter under higher pressure in the sidimentation process so it is harder and more stable, and basically inert and no benificial to plants.
2. The shale may have some benifits to plants, it is basically dried mud. But it will slowly dissolve in water, and that is why it is so dirty. You will be better off by using regular gravel plus some dirt from your back yard. It is a lot cheaper.
3. It is too coarse, up to 1/4 inch in size, and too sharply angled, not good to the root.
4. There is no special treatment to the crushed rock, no additional added benifit, no justification for the high cost.

.
1. I agree with Flourite being relatively inert (it lacks N and P). It does provide some micro nutrients though so its not completely devoid of nutritional benefits.
2. Sure it might erode over time but in the past 9 months of using the product, i have yet to see an issue with tons of dirt. More or less, its mulm, debris, etc. My tank is very clear, so if you are expecting urself to have a nice cloudy tank flourite is not going to be responsible for that. Maybe initially or when you move plants, but that can happen with any substrate.
3. I have Pogostemon erecuts and Staurogyne repens in my tank with flourite. Both are aggressive rooters and grow fine. In fact, the P. Erectus roots so fast in a week it will have spread a few inches and you can see it through the glass.
4. Its called Marketing
 

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I have used flourite on many tanks, recently set up a 120 in my store with about 12 bags of it. didn't rinse at all just carefully filled the tank and let the Eheim 2080 do its work. it is a great substrate if you accept its dustiness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
1. I agree with Flourite being relatively inert (it lacks N and P). It does provide some micro nutrients though so its not completely devoid of nutritional benefits.
2. Sure it might erode over time but in the past 9 months of using the product, i have yet to see an issue with tons of dirt. More or less, its mulm, debris, etc. My tank is very clear, so if you are expecting urself to have a nice cloudy tank flourite is not going to be responsible for that. Maybe initially or when you move plants, but that can happen with any substrate.
3. I have Pogostemon erecuts and Staurogyne repens in my tank with flourite. Both are aggressive rooters and grow fine. In fact, the P. Erectus roots so fast in a week it will have spread a few inches and you can see it through the glass.
4. Its called Marketing
I'll show you a photo of what I got tomorrow. Without knowing what it is, I'm sure most people here will be against the use it. Maybe I just got a bad batch. But it is really bad.
 

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Go get some fine grain coal slag and you will really know a dirt cloud... After your bacterial colony develops, the particles will become "sticky" with biofilm. It helps hold even the mud on the bottom of a dirted tank together.

If you have dust issues, let your filter do work over night or kill all the current, let the "problem dust" settle out and siphon it away, refill carefully.

I've dumped quarts of dry fired clay products into running tanks and everything settles out in a few hours. You will be ok.

If it's that bad, scoop it up and sell it on craigslist or something, then go get some alley gravel buddy...
 
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