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I doubt it, since temperature is out of their control. I think it's reptiles that do this, but remember that they're on land and nest their eggs, while shrimp just carry them. Not to mention water is much more dense, so it's more powerful in keeping temp.
 

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I've found where certain fish can have distorted sex ratios attributable to temperature manipulation during embryonic development.

I have yet to find ANY studies on inverts and TSD though. We know that it certainly plays a significant role in gestation times of eggs.
 

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i know for branchiopods, sex is determined while the egg is still being developed in the ovary. apparently, the hormone that determines sex is produced by the parent in response to various environmental cues. anyone who has tried to culture daphnids and had a population crash has seen the affect. the adult females produce hormones that result in the development of males, which they then breed with. sexual reproduction produces ephippia, which last until favorable conditions return.
if you have ever had a daphnid culture crash, dry the substrate out and rehydrate it. you will likely get those ephippia to hatch.

as for decapods, they are determined primarily by genetics, as far as anyone has been able to demonstrate. the interesting thing though, is that there are many species that are capable of producing intersex individuals, being genetically female but phenotypically male, or vise versa. they can reproduce as their functioning phenotype and only be capable of producing their genetic sex. marmokrebs are an oddity in that they are all female but also display male characteristics in the first pleopods, but produce all females without sexual reproduction.

basically i dont think anyone has been able to demonstrate what determines sex in most decopods. they know that if they remove androgenic glands from males early in developement, they will produce a female phenotype, but only certain species will retain the ability to reproduce.(again, they fill the function of their phenotype but produce their genotype)

as far as i know however, nobody has ever demonstrated temperature as being a factor in sex determination among decopods.
 
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