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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two months ago I tore down my 29G and started over. It so happens I stopped by my favorite fish store the day before Thanksgiving and they have a whole ton of Sawbwa Resplendens! I've spent 3 years looking for these guys and they show up in Utah! So I went back on Black Friday to get me a discount.

The resplendens have been in a quarantine tank up until yesterday. Now in their new home, there are also 3 Metae Cory's (bandit) and 2 long finned black tetras.

My question is mostly for those that have kept these beautiful fish or have knowledge of them. What tankmates would you recommend to put with the resplenden's? Currently I have 7 of them. I have no problem finding the tetra's a new home also, making more room for something else.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
 

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Gonna need more cories, so that's the first thing.
My suggestion would be a peaceful centerpiece fish... perhaps a pair of pearl gouramis? A large, calm betta, especially a short-finned one like a plakat, is another option. Plataks tend to be fairly calm, IME, so if the rummies aren't hyper that would work.
 

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Most recommendations for this fish is ALWAYS something smaller then them.They seem to max out at 1".
They are not really tetras,but more closely related to barbs.
They like 50/50 tanks with plants but enough open space to swim.
Being "less common" and an un often find,I would get up over 10 with them,increase the cories to around 6 at least and move out the long finned tetras(guessing black skirts?).
POSSIBLY some other small PEACEFUL fish,but you are pushing the space of your 29 IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Why not just 7 or so cories and fill the rest of the tank with the rummies?
I've considered it, I just really like variety. The resplendens are hiding a ton though. I wonder if more will get them out more.

Bump:
Gonna need more cories, so that's the first thing.
My suggestion would be a peaceful centerpiece fish... perhaps a pair of pearl gouramis? A large, calm betta, especially a short-finned one like a plakat, is another option. Plataks tend to be fairly calm, IME, so if the rummies aren't hyper that would work.

May I ask more cories. I actually want more, but what am I missing here?

On a sad note, woke up to 1 dead Cory this morning and 1 more is struggling to stay alive right now.

I tested the water the day before I put them in and was fine (ammonia, nitrate & nitrite). The other fish show no signs of struggle either. Would more help prevent this, or do you think I'm missing something with water quality?

A betta or gourami's would be pretty too, but I like the suggestion of going with something even smaller than them. Green neon tetra's come to mind.
 

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Your cories may have intestinal parasites. They often come in with them.
Cories are a schooling fish. They feel much safer in a school, which causes them to be more active. Also, you see more natural interactions if you have a school. In the wild, they live in groups of hundreds, if not thousands. We can't replicate that, but we do need to give them groups. Also, be sure you either get the same species or something near-identical.

What about some kind of small wild betta?
Dither fish (active, not-shy fish) would help coax your rummies out by showing them that it's safe.
 

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I have had mine for over 1 1/2 years. I have feather thin rainbows, glow light danios, cory's, sparkle gourami's, cockatoo cichlids & other rasbora all in the tank with them. They are very hardy and when the males are in breeding colors there more beautiful than rummy nose tetras. The males will fight off and on but other than that are very peaceful. The bad boys in the tank are the glow light danios when they get to breeding they will chase any other fish off. Best of luck and hopefully you got more males than females.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Your cories may have intestinal parasites. They often come in with them.
Cories are a schooling fish. They feel much safer in a school, which causes them to be more active. Also, you see more natural interactions if you have a school. In the wild, they live in groups of hundreds, if not thousands. We can't replicate that, but we do need to give them groups. Also, be sure you either get the same species or something near-identical.

What about some kind of small wild betta?
Dither fish (active, not-shy fish) would help coax your rummies out by showing them that it's safe.
Yeah, it's possible. However, it's confusing b/c they were QT'd for almost 2 months and within a week of being in the new tank, I've already lost 2. I'm going to keep an eye on things for another week or so then go back and get more so the one guy isn't so lonely.

I've never researched a dither fish. I'd have to see if I can one locally too. A betta would be nice also b/c of their colors. Great ideas.
 

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"Dither fish" isn't a species. The term refers to a smallish, not-scary fish that's active and unafraid of being out in the open, usually something like a bold tetra or rasbora. They swim around out in the open, and basically demonstrate that nothing is going to eat the shy fish.
Dither fish can also refer to a fast species of fish (danios, usually) that is put in a tank with breeding chiclids or other aggressive fish to give the meanies a target for their aggression that they can't actually get at and kill. That keeps them from killing each other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
"Dither fish" isn't a species. The term refers to a smallish, not-scary fish that's active and unafraid of being out in the open, usually something like a bold tetra or rasbora. They swim around out in the open, and basically demonstrate that nothing is going to eat the shy fish.
Dither fish can also refer to a fast species of fish (danios, usually) that is put in a tank with breeding chiclids or other aggressive fish to give the meanies a target for their aggression that they can't actually get at and kill. That keeps them from killing each other.
Good to know. I had a bunch of green tetras before this tank crashed, now only 2 are alive in another tank. I'm hoping to find more of them and put them in with the resplendens. They were very active.

If not, there are plenty of options out there.

Bump:
I have had mine for over 1 1/2 years. I have feather thin rainbows, glow light danios, cory's, sparkle gourami's, cockatoo cichlids & other rasbora all in the tank with them. They are very hardy and when the males are in breeding colors there more beautiful than rummy nose tetras. The males will fight off and on but other than that are very peaceful. The bad boys in the tank are the glow light danios when they get to breeding they will chase any other fish off. Best of luck and hopefully you got more males than females.
Very jealous of your setup. I wish I had a bigger tank. All good options though.
I actually have 5 males & 2 females. There were about 4 females available at the time I got them.
 
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