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So I asked my wife if I can get a bigger tank and she said ok (hooraay! :surprise:). This time I want a 125 gallon tank (or 180 gallon) and I want to use a sump this time. I want to get an input from you guys on:

1. Size of sump for 125 or 180.
2. Sump setup (filters, plumbing, equipment, etc)
3. How to effectively inject CO2.
4. Type of maintenance involved (cleaning, water levels, etc)
 

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1: For 125: 29 Gallon Sump minimum but if you can fit a 40b down there do it. the mroe room the better imo. For 180 gallon: 40b minimum

2: Pump: Jecod DCT 6000 has 10 speed settings.
Plumbing: use as few 90* angles as possible. I think you would need at least 1in pvc for 125 gallon+. 1in pvc is 600 gph of flow or so (straight drop)
Filter Mats: Personally i just use a blue matala mat stacked on top of a FairField poly-fil sheet (you can find a big bag of this at walmart for under $14)

3: Rex Grigg Reactor or Cerges Reactor

4: I just rinse off the matala mat every week (replace when it looks super worn out). replace with a new poly-fil sheet.

this is my basic sump:
 

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So I asked my wife if I can get a bigger tank and she said ok (hooraay! :surprise:). This time I want a 125 gallon tank (or 180 gallon) and I want to use a sump this time. I want to get an input from you guys on:

1. Size of sump for 125 or 180.
2. Sump setup (filters, plumbing, equipment, etc)
3. How to effectively inject CO2.
4. Type of maintenance involved (cleaning, water levels, etc)
See m tank images and description: http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/8...ussion/1005682-advise-current-tank-setup.html

1. Size of sump for 125 or 180.
My DT is 400L and sump is 100L.
2. Sump setup (filters, plumbing, equipment, etc)
You should get everything you need if you can buy the sump/tank as a package.
3. How to effectively inject CO2.
A CO2 kit for my tank was going to cost £400+. I got a fire extinguisher from work for free and paid £112 for the regulator with solenoid and the other bits from [Ebay Link Removed]
4. Type of maintenance involved (cleaning, water levels, etc)
Keep some kind of lid on your sump. Perspex/glass etc as you will lose a lot of water per week through evaporation.
 

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@SingAlongWithTsing which filters in the sump require constant maintenance?
In my sump i have the blue matala mat and poly-fil sheet in a plastic tote (its my drip tray) which sits on my bio-media (plastic pot scrubbies)

the poly-fil (the white sheet) is the one i replace every week. this is the product i use: Poly-Fil Extra-Loft Batting - Walmart.com

rinsing the blue matala mat and replacing the poly-fil is the only maintenance i have to do on the sump weekly. if there's detritus in the sump i siphon it out.
 

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I'm working on a 130g tank right now with a sump.

I have a ~22g Sump, which is what came with it. If you get to pick i'd go for a 40g, bigger is always better when it comes to sumps just because you get more total water volume. The more volume you have, the more stable the tank and the less you need to worry about evaporation. However there is no size requirement for the sump other than having enough water to pump back without your pump running dry. If you were using a canister filter or a HOB filter the total water volume would only be an extra 1-2g, so any sized sump is vastly superior.

For filtration make sure you filter the water first before anything else, and go from coarse -> fine filtration so that you don't have to clean it as much. That way you can clean the coarse filtration every week but you can probably go longer before cleaning the finer stuff.

CO2 can be done a number of ways. The most popular and efficient methods are with either a Rex Griggs or a Cerges reactor. They can be done inline with your plumbing or on their own line with a small pump. Inline you put the reactor immediately after the return pump to allow time for the CO2 to dissolve before making it back to the pump. If you do it on its own line then it will start and end in the final sump chamber with the output from the CO2 line going as close to as possible the return pump.

The most important things to know about a sump are you need to plan for two different situations:

1. Power outage. if you lose power the return pump will stop, and water will drain into the sump until it is below the overflow of the tank. You need to make sure this doesn't result in water all over your floor. The solution is very simple, just fill the sump to a point where it doesn't overflow if the power is out. Just unplug your pump and see where the water goes to, and only fill it until it is at the top of the sump. The only complication is the return plumbing can create a siphon once the pump is off if the returns are under the water. In order to prevent this you either need to keep the returns above the waterline, or add in anti-siphon holes close to the water line to break the siphon.

2. Overflow blockage. Leaves, dirt, fish, snails. All these things can accidentally block your overflow and prevent water from entering the sump. This is much less common than a power outage, but it is a possibility. In this case the sump pumps all the water into the display tank until there is none left in the final sump chamber. Solutions for this are varied. Some people have an emergency overflow that is higher up and will keep the sump running. Other people keep their tank water level low enough that it can handle the water from the sump. In general an emergency overflow is probably your best bet.

How you do the plumbing itself largely depends on your set up. How big the holes are, how many holes there are, what type of overflow you are using, what kind of flow you want etc. The bean animal overflow system seems pretty popular on this site if you are doing the drilling yourself.
 

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I have a 90 gallon with a 20 long sump. Seems about right for how I have it set up, I can go 2 weeks without having to top off the pump portion where my evaporation shows up. I do have glass tops on everything though.

I would go with a tank that isnt too tall for a sump as well. I had planed on a 29g but the salesman at my fish store swayed me to a 20 long as they arent nearly as high. His reasoning is that if you ever have to do any work in it its much easier with the shorter sides. This turned out to be one of the best pieces of advice I have gotten. Cleaning and any modifications have been made much easier.

I also want to touch on the subject of Co2, I had alot of trouble getting Co2 diffusion at an acceptable rate with no bubbles in the tank. I ended up with a Rex Grigg as my final reactor. If you go a Cerges on that big of tank I think you will need atleast 20 inches tall and probably fairly big in diameter, like 6-7 inches. While a Rex Grigg will probably end up being as tall, it wont be as big in diameter. I also run a separate pump for my reactor with ball valves on the inlet and exit of the reactor. This allows fine tuning of the flow to suite the reactor while your main pump on the tank keeps things circulating at an acceptable rate. I have found that you want to run your reactor pump wide open, and reduce flow on the exit of the reactor to build pressure within the reactor and aid in the dissolution of the Co2. Just place the outlet of the reactor close to the main return pump. For pump flow on the reactor side of things I would recommend something in the 600-700 range, you dont want something small, I made the mistake and went too small to start with.
 
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