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Hello all,

I am in the planning stages of a 90g aquarium and for filtration I am considering using an overflow and sump. I know many people use sumps successfully in high tech setups without letting all the co2 out but I am a bit confused as to the design to not let this happen. I know about the herbie/beananimal system for the overflow plumping so thats not an issue.

This is the design I am currently considering, the overflow pipe into the sump will be below the water level to prevent splashing there but my concern is when the water passes over the second baffle into the compartment with the return pump. Will that drop cause problems for co2?
 

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My sump flows in exactly the same pattern and it works very well. I have a few suggestions:

- Figure out how much media you actually want in your second chamber and lower the second baffle so that for much of the time, the water level of the second and third chambers is above the baffle level - this also adds to your evaporation volume.
- Make sure that the top of the second baffle is nicely finished. I had all of my glass cut and finished by a local glass company, and even when the pump chamber is below the level of the biomedia chamber (after about 4-5 days of evaporation), the sheet flow over the baffle is so smooth that there is very little turbulence.
-Think about ways to increase the surface area of the mechanical media (perpendicular to flow). This will be the first thing to get clogged and will slow flow down faster if it has a small surface area, increasing the flow velocity. I have a vertical sheet of poret foam in the first chamber between the overflow pipe and the glass, with a little clear space between the foam and the glass, so that water can flow through the foam over it's entire height - if it gets clogged, the water will flow over the top of the foam and down that clear space into the bio media. I also have my filter floss last (on top of the bio media) held down by a tight section of poret foam (which is held down with a bead of silicone around the edge of the chamber).

You've made a good start and have already thought about many of the issues.

-Justin
 

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One small drop isn't going to cause a big issue. If you are really worried you can seal the sump with saran wrap and duct tape, but in the end CO2 is cheap so it may not be worth your effort.
Your loss is minimal. Seriously, people over estimate the loss from surface agitation in larger setups. Secondly, CO2 is cheap. Your setup looks top notch. I have several posts on many other sump threads if you want to dig them up and check out some diagrams. There aren't many of us sump guys around (compared to the total number of TPT users). If you need anything, PM me.

Setup does look fine though. I would also look to raise the baffles upward to within an inch of the top of the sump to maximize water volume.
 

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In my home made sump, the water flow is so laminar over the edges you can hardly tell water is flowing over them unless you really look.
So the point being, if you get your baffles nice and vertical the water will flow over them with no splashing or turbulence and you will lose virtually no CO2.

Take Free's advice...maximize the water in your sump!
 

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I just realized that the original photo is mine. LOL! I thought it looked familiar, so I was going through my images to see if I could find some of my old ones. Here's the link to it on my photobucket haha.



Anyway, here's another similar sump setup I drew, it has an additional baffle because I had 2" slabs of foam that I wanted to utilize vs something like a filter sock or block of foam:



And here's a 3D model I made in google sketchup for a sump. I believe this was for my 400G+ build though, based on the 2000gph pump label. This is a 75g sump iirc.



Hopefully this continues to help searchers in the future.
 

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You won't be splash proof with your input pipe below the water line as the water runs down from the over flow you will bring air with it will make some splashing. It shouldn't make a difference but you will want a cover above it because there will be a lot of gurgling of water and air. What it does do is get rid of all those air bubbles before it gets in the rest of your filter. Your sump design looks good.
 

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I think co2 loss occurs because most people have a trickle filter in the first chamber, which i think provides better filtration than a submersed filter
 

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I just realized that the original photo is mine. LOL! I thought it looked familiar, so I was going through my images to see if I could find some of my old ones. Here's the link to it on my photobucket haha.



Anyway, here's another similar sump setup I drew, it has an additional baffle because I had 2" slabs of foam that I wanted to utilize vs something like a filter sock or block of foam:



And here's a 3D model I made in google sketchup for a sump. I believe this was for my 400G+ build though, based on the 2000gph pump label. This is a 75g sump iirc.



Hopefully this continues to help searchers in the future.
That is almost exactly how I did my sump dividers. Works well.
You really can't go wrong on a sump as long as you get the water moving up and down through media and have a large chamber for the return pump.

Is your tank already drilled/plumbed?
If not consider a bean animal or herbie overflow. They are air free and quite, no splashing with built in safety features for overflowing.
 

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I'm running a 450 gallon system with a 100 gallon sump. I have found CO2 loss minimal. I use center section of sump for pump uptake into CO2 reactor and place outflow hose in front of display pump uptake in 3rd chamber. This assures CO2 rich water is returned directly into tank.

One word about raising baffles to maximize water volume. Keep in mind that when pumps are off back flow to sump will have to have capacity to handle or your living room floor will! This is why most run sump baffles to water levels of 1/2 or so of total height.
 

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I'm running a 450 gallon system with a 100 gallon sump. I have found CO2 loss minimal. I use center section of sump for pump uptake into CO2 reactor and place outflow hose in front of display pump uptake in 3rd chamber. This assures CO2 rich water is returned directly into tank.

One word about raising baffles to maximize water volume. Keep in mind that when pumps are off back flow to sump will have to have capacity to handle or your living room floor will! This is why most run sump baffles to water levels of 1/2 or so of total height.
Correct you want maximum water volume with room for emergency backflow. When I built mine, I put the sump in place filled it to about 1/2 full then turned off the power and let it back syphon until the syphon was broke with the return line. This gave me a good idea how high I could put the baffles in.

You really want to always consider emergency situations. If you have that little devil in the back of your mind say, "ah it's good, it will never happen.>:)" You are screwed!
 
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