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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone,

I've been working on the sump design layout and wanted to gut check my design to make sure I'm not missing anything and that the sump won't flood. Some background on the system: 20 gallon long drilled for eclipse S overflow and return, aqueon 10-gallon aquarium for the sump, undecided return pump but likely the Jebao DCP-2500. I've included a sketch below (excuse the rough sketch).

View attachment 2223250

As for the design, I'm thinking a 3 baffle design should maximize my media space while still being relatively simple.
Chamber 1: Water in and coarse sponge. 5" wide, baffle overall height (including gap at bottom) is 10" with a 1.75" gap at the bottom for water outflow
Chamber 2: Heater chamber. 5" wide, baffle height is 8.25". I wish this chamber could be smaller but this size already has me placing the heater in at an angle
Chamber 3: Fine foam, ceramic bio media, and purigen. The baffle is the same as chamber 1
Chamber 4: Return pump

Flood protection math:
I measured the display tank's inside height at about 11.75 and the height from the bottom of the weir teeth to the top of the tank at 1.4. So dividing 20 gal by 11.75" gives about 1.7 gal per inch in the display tank. Then multiplying 1.7 gal/in by 1.4" gives a power outage drain volume of 2.38 which I rounded to 2.4 gal.

Moving to the sump, the inside height is 11.375". If we divide 11.375" by 10 gallons we get 1.1375 in/gal. Multiply that by 2.4 gives us a water rise of 2.73 inches. Add the water rise to the operating height of the fixed height chamber of 8.25 for a worst-case water height of 10.98" which is a bit tight on the 11.375 height of the sump since the above math doesn't account for water in the overflow box or lines. However, the height of the overflow from the tank top was measured right to the lip at the top, the actual water level will likely be lower. Also, I used the operating height of the fixed level portion of the sump and from my understanding, the right two chambers will have a lower water level which provides an extra safety net.

Does this reasoning and design sound workable?
 

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The link to your sketch did not work for me. I do not know if it because I am on a mobile device or what not.

I agree with your math and comes out correct. If it were me, I would do a trial run somewhere safe just to be 100%.

Also make sure your return is not lower than the weir, as that could create siphon in a power outage creating more water in your sump than calculated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The link to your sketch did not work for me. I do not know if it because I am on a mobile device or what not.
Sorry about that, I must have messed something up. Let's try again.
1030568


Unfortunately, the tank I am using was already drilled for an older style single drain with no overflow. Wanting more redundancy I drilled the tank again for the eclipse s and plan to use the original drill hole as the return. However, that hole is a bit lower than the top of the weir. I was planning to either use an elbow or lock line to push the return line closer to the surface. I was also planning to drill the return on the underside for a siphon break.

I will for sure do a test run once I have the baffles cut and installed. I just want to make sure I'm not missing anything before I get the baffles.

A few follow-up questions I forgot in my original post. Is the 1.75" gap under baffles 1 and 3 sufficiently large to allow free flow?

How much undersized in width should I have the baffles cut to allow for silicone? I've seen values ranging from 1/16" to 1/4"?

Should I have baffle 2 cut a bit short to allow for silicone underneath?
 

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Im not sure about the flow, but it seems like it could be enough. 175 square inches for 660 gph seems like enough.

As far as the baffles go, I would have them cut 1/4" shy of the sumps inside measurement, this will give you 1/8" on either side to play with, especially if things are perfectly sqaure. Filling that in with silicone should not be an issue.

And I would cut the middle baffle shorter to account for the factory silicone on the sump. I am assuming sump is glass?
 

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you could probably just use two baffles (easier to clean and maintain) and mount the heater diagonally on the floor in the larger area near the pump. That way the larger area can be used for Co2 reactor, float switch for evaporation, doser, etc. With the return pump inside the tank, you may not even need a heater.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes the sump is a standard aqueon glass 10 gallon aquarium so the existing silicone sealing the tank definetly creates a lip at the bottom since it's a cheap tank.

I have thought about the double baffle design and it sure would be nice and simple. However, that would put the heater in the same chamber as the pump which I've read is a big no no. Since that chamber is variable water level it has the possibility of running dry if the returns clog or the water level dropping low. I've read this can lead to heater meltdowns and potentially cracked tanks. Maybe it's not a big deal though.

For the reactor, I was planning to run it in line with the return, either in series or as a break out parallel path to tank advantage of the return pump to drive. Is there any issues in doing this? Seems to me it's a great way to only have one pump

Sent from my SM-G970U1 using Tapatalk
 

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The intake of the return pump usually needs a couple of inches to work, so IMO it shouldn't be a problem if the heater is mounted to the floor. You may need to install a rubber mat under the return pump as the humming noise could be amplified by the sump. Also, if the return pump were to run dry, you would have bigger problems with 5 gallons on the floor.

Not familiar with running a Co2 reactor in series (I ran separately a venturi styled reactor in the sump) but it should work). You just have to calculate how much additional head you will need to add because every elbow and twist reduces the output. The other thing, with a sump you may also not be able to achieve optimum Co2 levels just because of how sumps are designed. It naturally oxygenates the water through the turbulent motion (especially from the overflow and into the sump).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The intake of the return pump usually needs a couple of inches to work, so IMO it shouldn't be a problem if the heater is mounted to the floor. You may need to install a rubber mat under the return pump as the humming noise could be amplified by the sump. Also, if the return pump were to run dry, you would have bigger problems with 5 gallons on the floor.

Not familiar with running a Co2 reactor in series (I ran separately a venturi styled reactor in the sump) but it should work). You just have to calculate how much additional head you will need to add because every elbow and twist reduces the output. The other thing, with a sump you may also not be able to achieve optimum Co2 levels just because of how sumps are designed. It naturally oxygenates the water through the turbulent motion (especially from the overflow and into the sump).
The two baffle design is definitely interesting. I will do some mock ups this weekend once my pump gets here to get a feel for the spacing. What sort of filter media layout would use in this kind of design? Media in the first two chambers and pump and heater in the third?

As for head loss I think I should be okay. I went for the DCP-2500 for the return pump which is rated for 660 gph which is way more flow then I plan to push in this tank. Luckily it is adjustable so I should be able to dial it in.

The C02 loss is a good point, I plan to put sponges right up to the top of the baffles to try and prevent as much splasing as possible. I also figure that since this system is pretty small I shouln't burn through C02 insanely fast. My last tank was a 46 gallon with dual emperor HOB filters which also have a lot of water movement and splashing in the filter and I used to get nearly 6 months on a 10 pounder. Granted I used cut up two litter bottles to keep the tank surface calm but there was quite a bit of splashing in the filters themselves. I also was thinking I should get a C02 monitor since this tank is in a moderately sized apartment, my AC doesn't run much, and I really don't want to accidently gas myself.
 
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