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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

You have all been so great, I figured I'd reach out again for more help!

I am planning on buying my first co2 setup for my 40 gallon breeder, but had a couple questions first.

I have a single eheim 2217 canister filter for the 40 breeder. I had to drill some holes in the spray bar due to too high of a current before it was heavily planted. Spray bar is on the right side of the tank pointed slightly upwards. Left side has the intake mounted on the back/left corner. This helped reduce flow for the celestial danios and honey gouramis in there temporarily. Current gently flows right to left right now and circles back around to the right. Couple questions:

1) Will the eheim 2217 on a 40 breeder be sufficient flow?

2) is an inline diffuser effective with a spray bar? Or should I consider another means of delivering co2?

3)Spray bar placement with co2? Keep is the same?

4) inline diffuser goes on outflow I would imagine, right? I don't want to stress the impeller of the canister filter.

5) Any suggestion on drop checker liquid? Is a drop checker suggested even, or too vague of the reading? If vague, what do you suggest to dial in co2? (other thread links are accepted too!)

Thanks all for your feedback!!!
 

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Based on my experience here are my answers.

1) The specs of the 2217 says it would be sufficient, but depending on how heavily you stocked the tank you may need to consider a larger filter.
2) I've seen tanks with an inline diffuser and spray bar work fine. I've personally used reactors, inline, and in-tank diffusers and in my opinion it just comes down to preference ie. mist, equipment in the tank, etc.
3) I think its fine. You'll want to keep the slight upward angle for surface agitation, but not so much that it breaks the surface (if that makes sense)
4) Yes, the inline diffuser goes on the outflow. Many recommend that it's installed further down closer to the filter.
5) Any drop checker works really, they're all kinda the same. I have one, but I prefer to use a ph / KH test kit and refer to a ph/KH chart (tons on the forum along with how-to) to dial in my co2 levels. I've found this be to a more accurate way to hit a target co2 level for various size tanks.

Everyone's tank is going to vary, so it's common to make adjustments as you go. I would just make sure you getting quality equipment and a regulator with a solenoid to make it easy on yourself and livestock. Also hate to say it, but if your tank is thriving w/o co2 maybe save it for another tank (if it ain't broke....)

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Based on my experience here are my answers.

1) The specs of the 2217 says it would be sufficient, but depending on how heavily you stocked the tank you may need to consider a larger filter.
2) I've seen tanks with an inline diffuser and spray bar work fine. I've personally used reactors, inline, and in-tank diffusers and in my opinion it just comes down to preference ie. mist, equipment in the tank, etc.
3) I think its fine. You'll want to keep the slight upward angle for surface agitation, but not so much that it breaks the surface (if that makes sense)
4) Yes, the inline diffuser goes on the outflow. Many recommend that it's installed further down closer to the filter.
5) Any drop checker works really, they're all kinda the same. I have one, but I prefer to use a ph / KH test kit and refer to a ph/KH chart (tons on the forum along with how-to) to dial in my co2 levels. I've found this be to a more accurate way to hit a target co2 level for various size tanks.

Everyone's tank is going to vary, so it's common to make adjustments as you go. I would just make sure you getting quality equipment and a regulator with a solenoid to make it easy on yourself and livestock. Also hate to say it, but if your tank is thriving w/o co2 maybe save it for another tank (if it ain't broke....)

Good luck.

Thanks! This is super helpful.

Tank is filled with 20 CPDs, 9 honeys, 5 ottos and 4 nerites. Right now the spray bar doesn't break surface tension, so that is helpful to know it will still spread nicely like that.

Right now I'm constantly battling hair algae up top, and a few single puff spots of BBA down low. Tried turning down the light intensity, and my stems started to lose their red down the stems more and drop their bottom leaves. A sword tucked in the corner by the heater also started to die back.

This tank is pretty packed with full length red stems so I'm assuming it is a shade problem causing the poor growth when turned down. Full intensity had no issues with lower stem growth. And the hair algae and BBA seems to be a constant battle no matter the lighting intensity level. So it is a nutrient issue somewhere I'm chasing...

Someone mentioned on here that is a sign of co2 deficiency when I posted pics of the tank and by the algae behavior. Looked it up and it and it seemed to be plausible.

I EI dose with Thrive and have tried both dialing back and doing a normal "non-co2" dosing. No change in algae which leads me to believe NPK and micros are not the issue. But I'm still learning :)

I have a couple other planted tanks, but both much smaller. They primarily grow slow root feeders, so CO2 was never an issue. Not sure what I'm looking for to confirm CO2 lacking in a tank, but I feel like I've exhausted everything else.
 

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Red stem plants if you're trying to grow them really red need lower levels ( and testing..) of Nitrates, CO2 injection and consistent water changes with enough Iron and Micro fertilizers. The 2hr Aquarist is a good place to start for information about making the move to CO2 injection and high tech plant growing. The 2Hr Aquarist

Especially read their information about growing Red Rotalas, as they talk extensively about the right CO2 levels, lights, light quality and water fertilizers.

They do a bit of online selling through their information, though their information is free.
 

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I'd like to add: It's not always apparent, but there's a flow scheme when using an in-tank diffuser, that you should place the diffuser near the bottom of the tank very near opposite of where your canister filter return flow comes in.

So that the diffuser is in an area with strong downward water flow that spreads the released CO bubbles or mist out across the bottom of the tank before they have a chance to rise to the surface. This should, ( in theory at least..) spread the CO2 bubbles, as they diffuse and dissolve extensively, around the tank more evenly.
 

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Reactors should solve your CO2 dissolving issues. They are in-line on the output. I would check PH with a pen or other way to more accurately test, drop checkers are more for emergencies in my opinion but your fish should tell you too as long as you look.

With the water going up for agitation from the spray bar is the only issue I may see in CO2 evaporation but it shouldn't matter near as much with the reactor.

I think no adjustments should be needed, just put in the reactor to the output line.
 
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