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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got some ludwigia repens last week, Wed. They aren't that healthy looking. I have some stems, all 3 inches of them, having only 2 leaves...:) I am still very upset about this vendor. Now, the area I planted them was near the same spot that I had my 2 Temple plants died on me. I trimmed off the top and the bottom stems have no leaves. I managed to pull them out, with the roots, before they were completely rotted. They did rot a bit because I could smell the fouled egg odor. I dig into the substrate to release any trapped gas. I assume this area should be safe for plants? Also, I repurchased 2 bunches of ludwigia repens from my local fish store 2 days ago. I planted them near that same area as well.

The ludwigia repens I got earlier.....did their stems just rot because of the plant's poor health condition? Or because I planted them near a "dead" area? Right now, I am worrying about current bunches of ludwigia repens.

I have no problems replanting many of my cambombas, wisteria, and creeping jenny just by sticking the trimming right into the substrate.
 

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I usually give any new stems I buy a fresh cut before planting. Not much, maybe .1"-.5".

I've found that if the bottom of the stem is dying already, the stem will slowly die from the bottom upwards. Trimming off the dead part prevents this from happening.
 

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That's a pretty hardy plant. As long as you've got some stem left it will pretty much just grow. Don't know why the original plants didn't do well, but your second batch shouldn't have problems. If it does, I guess I'd look at the substrate where you're trying to plant them, but that just doesn't seem likely to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's a pretty hardy plant. As long as you've got some stem left it will pretty much just grow. Don't know why the original plants didn't do well, but your second batch shouldn't have problems. If it does, I guess I'd look at the substrate where you're trying to plant them, but that just doesn't seem likely to me.

Thanks. I will try to monitor the stems daily to see signs of rotting or turning transparent. If so, I may need to flow them in the water until they have roots. I also put another 4 stems where they will get more direct light to see if my lighting is an issue. It shouldn't be because that same area I used to have some Cabombas growing. It takes about 2 weeks for those cabombas to reach to the water surface from a 4 inches trimming.
 

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Having roots in aquatic plants really isn't that big of a deal, or a necessity, since nearly all plants (terrestrial or aquatic) can absorb all the nutrients they need through their foliage. However, rooting is a good thing, since it acts as a secondary method in which aquatic plants can get nutrients, and it helps to anchor them.

As for inducing rooting for stem plants, take your cutting and trim the bottom end off. All this does is create a wound (if it's a fresh cutting, then it obviously has a wound from the cut), and roots tend to grow much better and faster out of a wound. Second, just strip the bottom 1-2 inches of leaves off and just stick the cutting into the substrate. Then wait! Assuming you have adequate nutrients in the water column, your stems should root with no problem. Do not check for roots by pulling the stem out and inspecting it--just leave it alone and let nature do it's thing. If you did pull the stem out and notice it had a few roots forming, then stuck it back in the substrate, you would most likely kill the roots, since a root that is artificially bent upwards will usually die. So it's best just to leave them alone.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Having roots in aquatic plants really isn't that big of a deal, or a necessity, since nearly all plants (terrestrial or aquatic) can absorb all the nutrients they need through their foliage. However, rooting is a good thing, since it acts as a secondary method in which aquatic plants can get nutrients, and it helps to anchor them.

As for inducing rooting for stem plants, take your cutting and trim the bottom end off. All this does is create a wound (if it's a fresh cutting, then it obviously has a wound from the cut), and roots tend to grow much better and faster out of a wound. Second, just strip the bottom 1-2 inches of leaves off and just stick the cutting into the substrate. Then wait! Assuming you have adequate nutrients in the water column, your stems should root with no problem. Do not check for roots by pulling the stem out and inspecting it--just leave it alone and let nature do it's thing. If you did pull the stem out and notice it had a few roots forming, then stuck it back in the substrate, you would most likely kill the roots, since a root that is artificially bent upwards will usually die. So it's best just to leave them alone.

Good luck!

I meant.....I can tell if the stem is rotting if the lower part near the substrate is getting darker or transparent. I didn't mean I pull the stem out everyday to check...:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, you couldn't believe what is happening.... I believe I have purchased maybe 3 or 4 bunches of them. So far, I am down to 3 stems and maybe 2 to 3 smaller ones...:) They were either all rotting from the base of the stem or having all the old leaves melted away, regardless where I planted them (low or high light). It is unbelievable. I only have 1 growing ridiculously fast but only the young leaves are surviving. I have couple of them floating on the water surface and the stem was still rotting.

EI dosing.

Nitrate at 15ppm to 35ppm
Phosphate at 5 to 8 ppm
CO2 at lime green
Water temp is around 80 to 82 degree.
PH 6.4 during the day when CO2 is on and 7 at night when the CO2 is off.
 
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